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Avalanche Closes Richardson Highway Near Valdez

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first_imgOver the past 24 hours, a mix of heavy snow and rain has fallen in Valdez and the Copper River Basin resulting in very difficult and hazardous driving conditions on the Richardson, Edgerton, Glenn and Tok Cutoff highways. Temperatures have ranged in the high 20s to mid-30s. Crews will start clearing avalanche debris when the weather improves, avalanche risk decreases and it is safe to work in the area. Currently, heavy snow fall and unseasonably warm temperatures are creating prime conditions for additional avalanches. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities says the Richardson Highway is closed near Valdez, from mile 12-55, due to an avalanche at mile 39. The avalanche occurred this morning at approximately 3:30 a.m., and is an estimated 20 feet deep and 200 feet long. All available plows and sand trucks are out working to keep roads passable.center_img For updated road conditions visit 511.Alaska.Gov or call 511. The National Weather Service forecasts that heavy snow will taper off this afternoon, however light snow will continue overnight. The heaviest accumulation will be in Thompson Pass, with up to 45 inches. Valdez has received 12 inches of snow as of 6:30 a.m. and snow continues to fall steady across the region. Another weather front is expected to move in from the gulf Thursday, possibly bringing heavy snow for Thompson Pass with snow and rain in Valdez.last_img read more

Someday a drone will guard your home

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first_imgA drone might be your next guard dog.Sunflower Labs, a San Francisco-based startup, is combining motion detectors, a quadcopter and a phone app into a home security system. The Sunflower system could go on sale in 2020, according to CEO Alex Pachikov, who expects to charge wealthy customers several hundred dollars a month for the peace of mind — and replacement hardware if anything breaks. For comparison, premium security systems can cost more than $100 a month, and Sunflower says that six-camera systems can cost up to $300 per month.Drones for home protection might seem like overkill, especially if you first heard of unmanned aerial vehicles as something the military uses. But Pachikov said Sunflower’s technology is actually meant to head off the bunker mentality. In some areas, 99 percent of all home security calls are false alarms, so you probably don’t need to freak out when you hear the backyard bushes rustling. ShadeCraft Sunflower 8 Photos 2:45 Share your voice “Our brand is built around dispelling the notion that you need a panic room,” Pachikov said during a meeting at his Sunflower-protected home in a suburb south of San Francisco. Sunflower’s drone system, he said, will set your mind at ease by confirming it’s a possum, not a prowler, in your backyard.Drones have captured popular attention as they’ve become commercialized. Farmers monitor crops with drones, real estate agents photograph homes with them and movie makers use them to shoot overhead scenes. Some pests using drones have shut down traffic at major airports, including London’s busy Heathrow and Gatwick.Sunflower, which has 20 employees located in both California and Switzerland and demonstrated its tech at CES this year, isn’t the only company to use drones for security. Alarm.com touted some in 2017, and Drone Guarder is taking preorders for its products.”Two-thirds of families in America live in homes suitable for this,” Pachikov said, so when costs come down, he expects drone security to be commonplace. “They’ll be as common as Ubers in San Francisco. An average home will be able to afford this.”How it worksSunflower drones are the most obvious part of the company’s system, but it actually begins with what look like sidewalk lights — “sunflowers” — that will dot your property. The lights illuminate the ground and are equipped with motion and vibration detectors. Drones Smart Security Systems Security Preview • This solar patio umbrella follows the sun Commentscenter_img Now playing: Watch this: See Sunflower Labs’ home security drones 25 Tags How Sunflower’s home security drone spotted my bungled… The sunflowers send alerts to a computer in the drone’s base station, which Sunflower calls “the Hive.” The computer processes the signals to distinguish footfalls from car traffic and other benign sources of noise. The motion sensors can also tell if something is tall and narrow like a human, or short and wide like a dog.If the base station computer is worried, it sends an alert to an app on your phone. That will let you deploy a drone, which Sunflower calls “the Bee.” The base station cover opens and the drone heads out, piloting itself automatically around obstacles and staying about 20 feet in the air as it heads to the trouble spot. You can watch the video live on your phone.There’s no direct connection to the police, but Sunflower Labs’ setup can pull together a data package if you need to file a report. Pachikov says the startup could use others’ computing interfaces to automate reports in the future.Plenty of challengesGetting Sunflower’s quadcopters in the air won’t be without its challenges. Air space is heavily regulated, and a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration is necessary to fly a drone at night or beyond your own line of sight. If you’re near an airport, you’ll need to jump through more hoops. The Sunflower Labs drone emerges from its “Hive” base station. It’s part of a home security system set to go on sale in 2020. Stephen Shankland/CNET But Sunflower Labs expects those regulations to ease. Indeed, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao unveiled plans last month to liberalize some federal drone rules, in part to boost the economy and create jobs. Sunflower and its competitors will also face concerns from society at large. Is a mail carrier going to be happy when a quadcopter swoops by? And how about neighbors who don’t want the noise or privacy intrusion?I found the drones weren’t bothersome when I attended a company demonstration. I could hear the UAV through an open back door, but it was far quieter than gas-powered leaf blowers or lawnmowers.As for privacy, the drone flies only on the perimeter of your property and the cameras point toward your house. That means they won’t peer into other homes. Of course, you’ll have to explain that to an edgy neighbor. First published Feb. 7 at 5 a.m. PT.Update, 8:54 a.m. PT: Corrects the spelling of Alex Pachikov’s name and adds more information about the cost of security systems.Best drones for 2019: Our editors hand-picked these products based on our tests and reviews.High-flying pests: Super Bowl 2019 stadium pestered by drones, despite ban. Droneslast_img read more

Cardinals Travel to Marshall for Final Nonconference Game of the Season

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first_imgChung’s cannonFreshman Rebecca Chung has had a stellar rookie season offensively, but she has also made her presence known behind the plate. The catcher recently set a school record when she threw out a career-high four would-be base stealers in Louisville’s 10-9 win against No. 3/3 Florida State on April 8.• She also drove in the game-winning run against the Wildcats with a walk-off three-run doubles with two outs in the bottom of the seventh.  C-USA TV Melton’s scoring runMelton recently improved her career run tally to 145 and stands fifth on Louisville’s all-time list. She needs 13 more to tie Audrey Rendon (2004-07) for fourth.• Last year, the speedy infielder led the team with 45 runs and moved into a five-way tie for ninth place among the all-time single season leaders. Cardiac CardsIn the past two weeks, the Cardinals have had a few dramatic home games.•On April 17, Taylor Roby’s walk-off single in the seventh lifted the Cards to a 8-7 win after No. 24/23 Kentucky plated two runs in the top of the seventh to tie the game. The win snapped a three-game skid against the Wildcats.•On April 8, the Cards used a walk-off double by freshman Rebecca Chung to upend No. 3/3 Florida State, handing the Seminoles their first ACC series loss since 2012.• On April 21, Louisville overcame deficits of 5-0 and 10-6 to complete a series sweep of Georgia Tech while under time constraints due to the Yellow Jackets’ travel.• In a game which featured three lead changes and a tie and 21 combined runs, Louisville used a late-inning rally to take the lead for good, entering the bottom of the fifth trailing 10-8 with 15 minutes remaining before the game was called, Hensley delivered a two-out single and scored on Roby’s double to cut the lead to one. A wild pitch second Roby to third and Ferguson walked to put runners on the corners for Chung’s two-run double which made the score 11-10. The game was called due to a drop-dead time in the top of the sixth inning. Story Links Melton and Funke in a foot race• Sidney Melton leads the team with a career-high 24 and stands on Louisville’s single-season list, needing three more to tie Audrey Rendon (2008) for second.• She now has 57 stolen bases in her career, placing her third on Louisville’s all-time list and needs four more to move into a tie for second with Jennifer Esteban (2010-12).• Celene Funke is on Melton’s heels with 23 stolen bases and fourth among the Cardinals’ single-season leaders.• Funke recently pushed her career stolen base total to 43, good for seven on Louisville’s all-time list. She needs three more to move into a three-way tie for fifth with Candi Hicks (2004-07), and Kristin Austin (2009-12). Live scoring Up lastLouisville sweeps Georgia Tech series The University of Louisville softball team completed an ACC series sweep of Georgia Tech with a 7-2 win in game one of a doubleheader and took the second game 11-10 in six innings in game shortened due to the Yellow Jackets travel schedule. Prior to the doubleheader, the Cardinals picked up an 11-7 win in the completion of the series opener which was suspended in the fifth inning on Friday.• Redshirt senior Sidney Melton led the Cards at the plate, going 3-for-3 with two runs while junior Caitlin Ferguson drove in three. Sophomore Danielle Watson (9-11) picked up the win, allowing three earned runs on three hits and striking out seven.Louisville 11 – Georgia Tech 7UofL beat Georgia Tech 11-7 to complete the series opener Sunday on Don Dobina Field at Ulmer Stadium.  The contest was suspended due to rain Friday afternoon with the Cardinals leading 10-5 in the fifth. The win also marked head coach Holly Aprile’s 300th career victory.Louisville 7- Georgia Tech 2Redshirt senior Sidney Melton went 2-for-4 with an RBI, a run and a stolen base and freshman Charley Butler drove in a pair of runs to back sophomore RHP Danielle Watson who tied a career high with 11 strikeouts as the Cardinals clinched the series.Louisville 11 – Georgia Tech 10In the second half of Sunday’s doubleheader, the Cardinals overcame deficits of 5-0 and 10-6 to prevail 11-10 in a game that was called at 4:25 p.m. due to travel constraints.• In a game which featured three lead changes and a tie and 21 combined runs, the Cards collected 15 hits with nine of them falling in for extra bases including three home runs and six doubles.• Louisville used a late-inning rally to take the lead for good, entering the bottom of the fifth trailing 10-8 with 15 minutes remaining before the game was called, Hensley delivered a two-out single and scored on Roby’s double to pull the Cards within a run. A wild pitch second Roby to third and Ferguson walked to put runners on the corners for Chung’s two-run double which made the score 11-10.• In the game, Roby went 3-for-4 with two doubles and a home run, four RBIs, freshman Rebecca Chung went 3-for-4 with two doubles, a home run, three RBIs and two runs. Senior Megan Hensley went 2-for-3 with a home run and scored three runs.• Roby picked up the win, allowing six earned runs on five hits and striking out two in 3.1 innings. Hensley gave up four earned runs on one hit and struck out four in 1.2 innings. Game DAy INFORMATIONOpponent: MarshallSeries History: Louisville leads 5-2Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2019Location: Huntington, W. Va. | Dot Hicks FieldTelevision: CUSA TVLive scoring: GoCards.comTwitter Updates: @UofLSoftball  Print Friendly Version Louisville celebrates 20th SeasonThe 2019 campaign marks the University of Louisville softball program’s 20th season. Leading up to this season, UofL has compiled a 718-371 (.659) record with six conference championships, 13 NCAA regional appearances and four regional finals. Player quick hits• Redshirt senior Sidney Melton is climbing Louisville’s single season and career lists in runs and stolen bases. She has career highs in stolen bases (25), doubles (8), triples (4) and RBIs (30).      • Melton set a school record with four stolen bases against Morehead State (March 12).• Senior Megan Hensley stands among team leaders in home runs (9) and RBIs (36) as well as shutouts, while standing second in ERA (2.93) and strikeouts (80). She ranked in the top 10 on UofL career record lists several pitching and hitting categories.• Junior Celene Funke is having a career-best season with 43 runs, six doubles, 10 triples, three home runs, 23 stolen bases and 22 RBIs. She leads the team with 16 multi-hit games and seven multi-steal games.• Junior Caitlin Ferguson has a career-high 32 runs and tied a career high in home runs (4).• Sophomore Kyra Snyder put together a team best 13-game on-base streak (March 16-April 6)  – and is currently riding a seven-game streak of reaching safely.• Sophomore Maddy Newman has established career highs in runs (25), and RBIs (12).• Sophomore Jordyn Wolfe has career highs in runs (19) and stolen bases (7).• Sophomore Danielle Watson connected on her first career double, home run this season. She has also dealt a career-high 138 strikeouts.• Freshman Charley Butler put together a team-best 11-game hitting streak (March 30 – April 21). The left fielder has made some outstanding defensive plays and was recently among ESPN SportCenter’s Top 10 Plays (No. 8) after a diving catch in foul territory for an out in the 10-9 win over No. 3/3 Florida State (April 8).      • Her first career hit was a home run (vs. Bradley, Feb. 24).•Freshman Rebecca Chung has been one of Louisville’s top hitters throughout the season. She leads the team with 11 multi-RBI games. Her three-run double in the seventh lifted the Cards to a 10-9 win over No. 3/3 Florida State (April 8). She also threw out a school-record four base stealers in that game.      • She earned ACC Co-Player of the Week honors on April 9.      • Chung put together 10-game hitting streak (March 8-23).      • Chung’s two-run double in the fifth put the Cards ahead for good in the 11-10 win over Georgia Tech to ensure the series sweep (April 21).• Redshirt freshman Taylor Roby leads the team in wins and stands third in batting average. She got the win in the circle and registered the game-winning hit against No. 24/23 Kentucky (April 17). Live scoring: https://herdzone.com/sidearmstats/softball/summaryC-USA TV: http://conferenceusa.com/watch/default.aspx?Live=7687&path=marshallFacebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/herdsoftball/Radio: https://www.marshall.edu/wmul/ Up NextThe Cardinals return home to play host to North Carolina in the final home series of the season. Prior to Saturday’s 1 p.m. contest, Louisville will honor seniors Blaire Bass, Madison Cousineau, Darrianne Hale, Megan Hensley and Sidney Melton in their final home weekend. Cards against the fieldMarshallSeries Record: Louisville leads 5-2Last Meeting: May 2, 2018 – UL won 13-10 at Ulmer Stadium.RECAP: Megan Hensley’s two-out grand slam in the bottom of the fifth erased a three-run deficit and helped her cause in the circle as the Cardinals defeated Marshall 13-10 in their home finale at Ulmer Stadium.Scouting the Thundering Herd: Marshall brings a 28-16 overall record into Tuesday’s contest after taking two of three games against Conference USA foe Louisiana Tech over the weekend.• Aly Harrell leads the team with a .319 batting average, 11 home runs and 33 RBIs.• Abigail Tolbert (17-12) carries a 3.12 ERA with 121 strikeouts in 166.0 innings.  Radio Cards reach 30-win mark for 16th straight seasonOn April 21, the Cardinals defeated Georgia Tech 7-2 to clinch the ACC series and reach their 30th win of the season.• Louisville has now posted 30 or more victories in 16 straight seasons (dating back to 2004). The Cards have posted at least 30 wins 18 times in the 19-year history of the program with a record-setting 55 victories in 2012. UofL dedicates Don Dobina FieldThe University of Louisville softball team named its field Don Dobina Field at Ulmer Stadium to honor the legacy of local softball coach, donor and UofL alum Don Dobina. The ceremony took place just prior to the game against Kentucky on April 17.• Dobina, who passed away in 2016, was an avid supporter of the University of Louisville softball program and an advocate of the sport throughout the commonwealth of Kentucky for nearly 30 years.center_img Home Sweet HomeLouisville has compiled a 15-3 record at Ulmer Stadium this season with three wins over ranked opponents (No. 3/3 Florida State twice and No. 24/23 Kentucky).• The Cards went 4-0 in their home-opening Cardinal Classic and followed with a doubleheader sweep of Morehead State. UofL continued it perfect home record by taking the first two games of the ACC series against Syracuse but fell 4-2 in eight innings to the Orange. The Cards resumed their winning ways with a 5-2 victory over Indiana. Louisville suffered another extra-inning setback when Lipscomb prevailed 5-4 in eight. Louisville’s fourth loss came at the hands of No. 3/3 Florida State on April 6. Funke, triple forceJunior Celene Funke is leads the NCAA with 10 triples on the season. She stands tied for first with Audrey Rendon (2005) on Louisville’s single season list.• The centerfielder has 12 triples in her career and is fourth on Louisville’s all-time list. She needs one more to move into a tie for third with Courtney Moore (2004-07).• She also has three home runs on the season.  Fresh off of an ACC series sweep against Georgia Tech, the University of Louisville softball team will take its final break from conference play when the Cards travel to Marshall for a midweek matchup Tuesday at 3 p.m. at Dot Hicks Field. Louisville vs Marshall Hitting for averageLouisville’s starting lineup features five players who are batting over .300 on the season. Redshirt senior Sidney Melton leads the charge at .349 while junior Celene Funke is right behind her at a .337 clip. Redshirt freshman Taylor Roby (.330), freshman Rebecca Chung (.324) and senior Megan Hensley (.321) round out the top hitters. Young CardsWhile the Cardinals have solid veteran leadership in the lineup some underclassmen are having an immediate impact early in their careers with as many as five in the starting lineup at times.• Redshirt freshman Taylor Roby leads the team with a 2.31 ERA and stands third on the squad with a .330 batting average.• Freshman catcher Rebecca Chung is second on the team with 31 RBIs and fourth with a .324 battiing average. She recently set a school record for runners caught stealing in a game with four in the 10-9 win against then-No. 3/3 Florida State (April 8) and was named ACC Softball Co-Player of the Week on March 17.• Freshman Charley Butler has started 42 games in left field and has two home runs. She has made some outstanding defensively plays and was recently among ESPN SportCenter’s Top 10 Plays (No. 8) after a diving catch in foul territory for an out in the 10-9 win over No. 3/3 Florida State (4/8).• Freshman Cassady Greenwood has played in 27 games with four starts and has collected eight RBIs.• Sophomores Maddy Newman and Kyra Snyder have started every game at second base and first base respectively.• Fellow sophomore Riley Schindler has started 28 games in the outfield.• Sophomore Danielle Watson leads the team in the circle with 138 strikeouts in 125.0 innings and a .214 opposing batting average. She was named ACC Co-Pitcher of the Week on April 9 after tossing a complete-game shutout in Louisville’s 2-0 win over No. 3/3 Florida State (4/6). Melton earns ACC postgraduate scholarshipSidney Melton was among 52 recipients of the 2019 Weaver-James-Corrigan Postgraduate Scholarship Award announced on Thursday by the Atlantic Coast Conference.• The Weaver-James-Corrigan and Jim and Pat Thacker postgraduate scholarships are awarded to selected student-athletes who intend to pursue a graduate degree following completion of their undergraduate requirements. Each recipient will receive $6,000 toward his or her graduate education. Those honored have performed with distinction in both the classroom and their respective sport, while demonstrating exemplary conduct in the community. Hensley, dual threatFor the fourth straight season, Megan Hensley stands among the Cardinals’ leaders both in the circle and at the plate. The senior leads the pitching staff with four shutouts and stands second in ERA (2.93), strikeouts (80) and innings pitched (86.0).• She also leads the Cards with nine home runs and 36 RBIs.• Hensley is ranked among UofL’s top 10 in several pitching and hitting categories. Balanced pitchingAll three of Louisville’s starting pitchers have evenly contributed to the team’s success in the circle.• Redshirt freshman Taylor Roby (12-1) leads the team in wins and ERA (2.31).• Senior Megan Hensley has collected a team-high four shutouts and stands second with a 2.93 ERA.• Sophomore Danielle Watson (10-11) is holding opponents to a .214 average. She leads the Cardinals with 138 strikeouts in 125.0 innings. Hensley record watchMegan Hensley has entered Louisville’s top career list in several categories.• Tied for first for grand slams with four, along with Lacy Wood (2003-06).• Fifth with nine career saves and needs one more to tie for fourth with Tori Collins (2009-12).• Tied for fourth in career RBI (165) with Alicja Wolny (2010-13). She needs one more to ti Katie Keller (2011-14) for third.• Fourth in career home runs (34) and needs two more to tie Melissa Roth (2007-10) for third.• Seventh in career appearances (117). Tori Collins (2009-12) stands sixth at 142.• Seventh in career games started in the circle (83). Carlisa Connell (2011-14) is sixth with 98.• Seventh in career innings pitched (522.0). Caralisa Connell is sixth with 608.0.• Seventh in career wins (50). Jessica Rak (2000-03) stands in sixth place with 65 victories.• Eighth in career strikeouts (361), Aja Sherman (2002-05) is seventh with 463.• Tied for eighth in career complete games (32). Needs nine more to move into a tie for seventh with Aja Sherman (2002-05).• Tied for tenth in career complete shutouts (10). Needs three more to move into a tie for seventh with Caralisa Connell (2011-14). Melton sets single game stolen base record Sidney Melton set a school record with four stolen bases in the 8-0 win over Morehead State on March 12. Georgia Tech Series Notes:• The Cardinals have now won five straight and seven of their last eight.• Louisville has produced at least seven runs in the last five games and seven of its last eight.• UofL won its third straight ACC series• With the win in the opening game, head coach Holly Aprile collected her 300th career victory.• The Cardinals’ 7-2 win in game two marked their 30th victory of the season, extending the program’s streak to 16 straight seasons with 30 or more wins.• Louisville has a 15-3 record at Ulmer Stadium in 2019.• As a team, Louisville has registered a program-record 87 stolen bases with 101 attempts on the season. The previous record was 68 (95 attempts), set in the 2010 seasonPlayer Notes• Freshman Charley Butler has reached safely in the last 12 games.• Redshirt senior Sidney Melton has reached safely in the last 10 games.• Junior Celene Funke is on a six-game hitting streak.• Funke leads the team with 43 runs and stands second with 23 stolen bases.• Redshirt freshman Taylor Roby tallied career highs in hits and RBIs in the 11-10 series finale. Facebook Live CARDINAL QUICK HITS• Louisville enters the game with a 31-15 overall record and on a five-game win streak.• UofL is receiving votes in the ESPN.com/USA Softball and the USA Today/NFCA coaches poll released on April 16.• Louisville recently jumped four spots to No. 29 in the NCAA RPI standings released on April 22.  • This past weekend, the Cardinals notched their first ACC sweep of the season with three wins against Georgia Tech. UofL improves to 11-7 in league play.The Cards are third in the Atlantic Division behind Florida State (13-5) and Notre Dame (10-6).• The Cardinals have now won five straight and seven of their last eight.• Louisville has produced at least seven runs in the last five games and seven of its last eight.• With the win in the opening game of the Georgia Tech series, head coach Holly Aprile collected her 300th career victory.• The Cardinals’ 7-2 win in game two marked their 30th victory of the season, extending the program’s streak to 16 straight seasons with 30 or more wins.• Louisville has a 15-3 record at Ulmer Stadium in 2019.• As a team, Louisville has registered a program-record 87 stolen bases with 101 attempts on the season. The previous record was 68 (95 attempts), set in the 2010 season• Louisville led at the plate redshirt senior Sidney Melton who is batting .349 with a team – and career – best 24 stolen bases.• Junior Celene Funke leads the team with 43 runs. The centerfielder recently tied a school record with four runs in the 8-7 win against No. 24/23 Kentucky, she also belted out her 10th triple of the season. She leads the nation in that category and tied Louisville’s single season record.• As a team, Louisville has registered a program-record 87 stolen bases on the season. The previous record was 68, set in the 2010 season.• In the circle, redshirt freshman Taylor Roby leads team with a 12-1 record and a 2.31 ERA. Hensley (9-3) stands second with a 2.93 ERA while sophomore Danielle Watson (10-11) holds a 3.58 ERA with a team-high 138 strikeouts in 125.0 innings. • Hensley and senior Sidney Melton were selected to the 2019 Preseason All-ACC Team.• The 2019 campaign marks Louisville’s 20th season as a program and first under new head coach Holly Aprile’s tutelage.• The Cardinals were picked to finish third in the Atlantic Division and fifth overall as voted on by the league’s 12 head coaches. The Aprile Era2019 marks the first season under new head coach Holly Aprile following the retirement of Sandy Pearsall, who began the program in 2000. Aprile is the second head coach in Louisville softball history.• Prior to her arrival at Louisville, Aprile, 2018 ACC Coach of the Year spent 10 seasons (2009-18) as Pittsburgh’s head coach and five years (2004-08) as an assistant. In 2018, she earned ACC Coach of the Year honors after leading the Panthers to the 2018 ACC Coastal Division title and a runner-up finish in the conference tournament. Cards swiping records• As a team, Louisville has registered a program-record 87 stolen bases  with 101 attempts on the season. The previous record was 68, set in the 2010 season.last_img read more

Researchers explore Liair battery reversibility on the nanoscale

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first_img Explore further The researchers, Thomas Arruda, Amit Kumar, Sergei Kalinin, and Stephen Jesse at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, have published a paper in a recent issue of Nanotechnology in which they explore factors controlling the reversibility of the particle growth on an electrolyte underlying Li-air batteries and nanobatteries.“We believe this work paves the way for studying irreversible or quasi-reversible nanoscale electrochemistry – in materials systems ranging from Li-air batteries to more established fields such as corrosion, electroplating, and many others,” Kalinin told Phys.org.“Primary Li batteries, which are non-rechargeable and disposable, have high energy densities and have been commercially available since the 1960s; however, they can only be used once,” said Arruda. “In order for these cells to be competitive, for example, with fossil fuels (i.e., automotive applications), they need to be recharged hundreds, if not thousands, of times. Consider the average commuter refueling once per week. This equates to more than 500 fills over the course of a decade. An automotive Li-air battery would need to match this criterion, even without considering cost or other important metrics. In fact, reversibility remains the single most important and difficult task to achieve for Li-air batteries, as evidenced by the intense scrutiny of the leading battery experts.” When a charged Li-air battery is in use, the Li ions in the anode travel to the cathode, where they react with oxygen via an oxygen reduction reaction. The electrons resulting from this reaction are then harvested and used to provide electricity for electronic devices. To recharge the battery, the Li ions must travel from the cathode back to the anode. As the researchers explain, the reason it is so difficult to make Li-air batteries rechargeable is because the batteries combine the most difficult processes used in both batteries and fuel cells. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers explore Li-air battery reversibility on the nanoscale (2012, August 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-explore-li-air-battery-reversibility-nanoscale.html Li-Air: Argonne opens new chapter in battery research (w/ Video) “Underpinning these processes is an abundance of unfavorable chemistries such as the poor solubility of reaction products (LiOx species), slow reaction kinetics, and the propensity of Li metal to react unfavorably with nearly everything,” Jesse said. “For the case of the anode, the electrodeposition of Li ions to metallic Li often proceeds with the formation of needle-like Li particles called dendrites. These particles negatively affect the battery by (1) becoming disconnected from the anode and thus unavailable to participate in the reaction and (2) increasing the risk of an internal short circuit which could cause thermal runaway and fire. At the cathode, the oxygen reduction reaction remains as big a challenge for Li-air batteries as it is for fuel cells. When the two reactions are combined, they form a mixture of insoluble products which are difficult to react in reverse and eventually choke the cathode.”In their study, the researchers used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to investigate battery reversibility by analyzing the growth of Li particles. While sweeping the bias of a 20-nm AFM tip across the surface of a Li-ion conductive glass ceramic electrolyte, they measured the change in tip height during the cycling process. They found that increases and decreases in the tip height correspond to changes in current, allowing them to demonstrate the existence of reversibility as well as map the degree of reversibility at different locations.In the future, the researchers hope to further improve the reversibility, and note that Li-air batteries still face many other challenges before they can become commercialized.“Technological developments and systems engineering on all major components of Li-air batteries are required to bring this technology to market,” Kalinin said. “Better catalysts are needed on the cathode, Li anode protection without functional hindrance remains paramount, and superior multifunctional electrolytes need development. The ubiquitous necessity to understand fundamental processes at the most basic level of the key battery components remains a top priority. Only after a comprehensive understanding of the elementary processes is achieved can the chemistries be fine-tuned and the systems be properly engineered to meet the metrics demanded by the application.”If researchers can overcome these challenges, Li-air batteries could potentially store energy for a wide variety of applications.“If Li-air batteries could be realized, the primary application would be for transportation and other situations where mobility is necessary (like laptops, etc.) since they will be very lightweight for the amount of energy they store,” Arruda said. “Optimization of Li-air batteries to include a large number of charge/discharge cycles will drive down the cost and make fully electric vehicles a reality without the need for heavy batteries as is the current situation. Beyond this, it is easy to envision this technology (Li-air nanobatteries) being applied to microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). These may be the ideal systems to employ such energy sources as they would have much lower energy demands and could operate for extended periods of time.”center_img Copyright 2012 Phys.Org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. More information: Thomas M. Arruda, et al. “The partially reversible formation of Li-metal particles on a solid Li electrolyte: applications toward nanobatteries.” Nanotechnology 23 (2012) 325402 (9pp). DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/23/32/325402 Journal information: Nanotechnology (Phys.org) — As their name suggests, Li-air batteries use air to operate, pulling out oxygen molecules to use in a porous, carbon-based cathode, while using lithium in the anode. Because using air means the battery doesn’t have to store a heavy charge source at the cathode, the batteries can provide an extremely high energy density, holding nearly as much energy in a given volume as gasoline, and 5-10 times more than Li-ion batteries. Despite this major appeal, Li-air batteries still face many limitations that hold them back from commercialization. In a new study, a team of researchers has tackled one of these challenges: reversibility, which is necessary for being able to recharge the battery multiple times.last_img read more

Leaves of ancient carnivorous plants found in Baltic amber

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first_img(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany has discovered samples of two types of carnivorous plants that apparently date from the Eocene, embedded in Baltic amber. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes the plant leaves and offers opinions on their possible ties to modern carnivorous plants. The amber was part of a trove that has been found in a mine near Kaliningrad, Russia, where tons of samples have been taken over the past couple hundred years. The researchers obtained their samples from a pair of German amber collectors. Embedded inside two pieces of amber the researchers found leaves from what they believe to be the oldest known examples of a carnivorous plant.The researchers believe the leaves date back approximately 35 to 47 million years ago, a time when Europe was warmer than today and still isolated from Asia. The find is rare, the team notes, as plants doesn’t fossilize well. They think the original plants might be part of the Roridulacea family of carnivorous plants, which of course includes Roridula, which lives in modern times in South Africa. While technically a carnivore, the Roridual (and likely the newly found fossils) don’t actually eat other creatures, instead they capture insects with sticky leaves and then wait for other insects to come by and eat them. The plant gets its nourishment from the excrement left by the bigger insects.The team reports that the leaves were very well preserved and very different from other flowering plants—they have tentacley hairs which are believed to have exuded sticky fluid. They’re also very small, just five millimeters long. They suggest the original plant likely had larger leaves as well, but can’t say for certain. The leaves also offer no clues as to how big the plant might have been. Larger leaves (and bugs, animals, etc.) don’t tend to become trapped in tree resin, they note, which means modern scientists have very little to work with when attempting to reconstruct conditions from so long ago.The research was part of a larger ongoing effort to better understand the early history of the area which led to so much amber being produced. They want to know, for example, if it was dense forest or woodlands with the occasional meadow. © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Citation: Leaves of ancient carnivorous plants found in Baltic amber (2014, December 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-ancient-carnivorous-baltic-amber.html More information: Carnivorous leaves from Baltic amber, Eva-Maria Sadowski, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1414777111 AbstractThe fossil record of carnivorous plants is very scarce and macrofossil evidence has been restricted to seeds of the extant aquatic genus Aldrovanda of the Droseraceae family. No case of carnivorous plant traps has so far been reported from the fossil record. Here, we present two angiosperm leaves enclosed in a piece of Eocene Baltic amber that share relevant morphological features with extant Roridulaceae, a carnivorous plant family that is today endemic to the Cape flora of South Africa. Modern Roridula species are unique among carnivorous plants as they digest prey in a complex mutualistic association in which the prey-derived nutrient uptake depends on heteropteran insects. As in extant Roridula, the fossil leaves possess two types of plant trichomes, including unicellular hairs and five size classes of multicellular stalked glands (or tentacles) with an apical pore. The apices of the narrow and perfectly tapered fossil leaves end in a single tentacle, as in both modern Roridula species. The glandular hairs of the fossils are restricted to the leaf margins and to the abaxial lamina, as in extant Roridula gorgonias. Our discovery supports current molecular age estimates for Roridulaceae and suggests a wide Eocene distribution of roridulid plants.center_img Fossil leaf of a flypaper trap plant in Baltic amber. Credit: Alexander R. Schmidt, University of Göttingen Explore further Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Beyond the naked eye

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first_imgNature has no boundaries. The more you try to explore it, the more it makes you realise your rawness. And then the search for the unknown takes the form of an art. Works by artist DP Sibal, who is primarily inspired by nature, is being exhibited at the Hungarian Culture Centre. The exhibition that kicked off on 21 March showcases twenty of his paintings.Great art picks up where nature ends. Justifying this famous qoute of Marc Chagall, Sibal’s works are embeded in nature. We got to talk to the artist. Read on to know more… Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’What are your major influences?I think my childhood is the biggest influence for me, being a child I was always surrounded with lush green spaces, peacocks used to come on our roof tops. Clear skies with endless shining stars as if we were living admits nature unlike today where greenery is shrinking and pollution had taken over the night skies, these all have inspired influenced me time to time to relive the beauty of childhood gone by.What is the theme of your painting? Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixI have always painted on nature as a theme and this time I’m exploring natures unknown dimensions, going a step ahead into the vastness of the cosmos, the unknown spaces which are ‘beyond the naked eye’.Do you follow a particular style of painting?I think freedom is the style of my work, to have no boundaries when painting, being able to express limitlessly and  have a vibrancy in the colours is my style.What is the uniqueness of your work?Well uniqueness is in the eye of the beholder. Everyone interprets art in their own way which is unique by itself. What  message do you want to convey through your pieces?The message we focus on the beauty nature holds, which we miss in the rush of today’s times and think how to preserve nature for generations to come so they can inherit the beauty it has to offer.What lies next in the pipeline?Difficult to answer right away, my love for natures remains strong, I’m thinking of the moon and planning to showcase different dimensions of the moon. I guess that might be what is in pipeline.last_img read more

Styling with Khadi

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first_imgDuring the fashion show eight sequences like Make in India , Swachh Bharat Abhiyaan, Videsh se swadesh, Woollen wear, bridal wear were presented by leading fashion models. Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) of MSME Government of India participated in the 35th edition of India International Trade Fair (IITF) organised from November 14th to 27th at  Pragati Maidan. This year, the theme of IITF-2015 was “MAKE IN INDIA”. KVIC has set up biggest ever exclusive pavilion. The sales in khadi pavilion recorded approximately 20 lakh per day.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Giriraj Singh Minister of State for MSME, inaugurated Khadi fashion show as chief guest in presence of Vinai Kumar Saxena, Chairman, KVIC  along with Anup K. Pujari, Secretary, B.H. Anil Kumar Jt. Secretary MSME and, Arun Kumar Jha, Chief Executive Officer, KVIC graced the occasion.First time in Khadi Pavilion a large statue of Mahatma Gandhi was put up at the main entrance of the Hall for  taking “selfie with Gandhiji”. This had become hotspot of the pavilion, as people from all age groups visited and took selfie with Gandhi ji in different poses. First time two hundred participants’, i.e artisans, craftsmen and khadi institutions from across the country had put up their most exclusive products in the pavilion. Ten nationalized banks have also associated with KVIC as sponsors and had put-up their stalls inside the pavilion. First time, the technical demonstration of spinning and weaving of khadi has been displayed in the Pavilion.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIn India, Khadi is not just a cloth, it is a whole movement started by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. The Khadi movement promoted an ideology, an idea that Indians could be self-reliant on cotton and be free from the high priced goods and clothes which the British were selling to them. The British would buy cotton from India at cheap prices and export them to Britain where they were woven to make clothes. These clothes were then brought back to India to be sold at hefty prices. The khadi movement aimed at boycotting foreign goods including cotton and promoting Indian goods, thereby improving India’s economy. Mahatma Gandhi began promoting the spinning of khadi for rural self-employment and self-reliance (instead of using cloth manufactured industrially in Britain) in 1920s India thus making khadi an integral part and icon of the Swadeshi movement. The freedom struggle revolved around the use of khadi fabrics and the dumping of foreign-made clothes. When some people complained about the costliness of khadi to Mahatma Gandhi, he started wearing only dhoti.last_img read more

More than half of consumers in pay TV homes have u

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first_imgMore than half of consumers in pay TV homes have used TV Everywhere services to watch content, according to a North American study by GfK.The report says that though ‘TV Everywhere’ as a brand name is still struggling to build awareness among consumers, 53% of pay TV viewers have used these services – up 10 percentage points compared to 2012.GfK said that mobile devices were the “main driver” of TV everywhere growth, with monthly use of mobile apps and websites from TV providers doubling since 2012.The study also said among the 13-35 and 36-49 age groups use of mobile TV everywhere sites and apps – as well as smart TV apps – was two to four times higher than for those aged 50-64.“Consumer education continues to be a critical missing piece of the puzzle for TV Everywhere (TVE),” said David Tice, senior vice-president in media and entertainment at GfK.“With a notable proportion of people in pay TV homes already using TVE, greater awareness and understanding of the services could drive even higher adoption. Greater success of TV Everywhere could help pay TV services stave off becoming ‘dumb’ broadband pipes, and also assist TV networks in maintaining their status as the original aggregators of high quality video content.”last_img read more

Voot the videoondemand service launched last we

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first_imgVoot, the video-on-demand service launched last week by Viacom18, the Indian JV between Viacom and local player Network18, is being powered by Kaltura’s OTT TV platform, the technology company has announced.The ad-supported video streaming service launched last week, with close to 17,000 hours of domestic and international content from channels associated with Viacom18, including the flagship Hindi GEC- Colors, Nickelodeon and MTV India among others.last_img