Month: November 2020

Why Arizona’s Storied Conservative Stronghold Could Flip for Biden

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first_img“Just being Latino in the state gave us a lot of anxiety,” said Ms. Maldonado, 29. “You’d say goodbye to your parents in the morning and not know if they would be caught up in a raid.” As Arizona now stands to become a coveted prize for Democrats, Maricopa County is undergoing what may amount to one of the biggest political shifts of any major county in the United States in recent years. The last time Maricopa County came this close to siding with a Democratic presidential candidate was in 1948.“We think of John Wayne and the Sonoran Desert when we have visions of Arizona, but the truth is we’re an urban state where the Phoenix metro area is the heart and soul of Arizona at this point,” said Joseph Garcia, executive director of Chicanos Por La Causa Action Fund, a Phoenix group that helped register and turn out thousands of Latino voters for Joseph R. Biden Jr. Accounting for about 60 percent of Arizona’s population with nearly 4.5 million people, Maricopa County ranks among the fastest-growing counties in the United States. The influx of more voters from other states, many of them relatively moderate or liberal, has produced some of this growth.But the county has also provided one of the most important venues for the ascendancy of Latino voters and elected officials in recent years, following the rapid growth of its Latino population since the start of the century, from about 365,000 in 2000 to more than 1.3 million in 2020.While Latinos in Florida got much of the nation’s attention this week for helping Mr. Trump win that state, efforts to boost voting for Democrats by Arizona’s Latinos got relatively little notice — and negligible help from the national Democratic Party, Mr. Garcia said.“All the attention for whatever reason goes to Miami-Dade County as if that is the center of the universe for Latinos,” he said. Referring to the national party, he added, “We didn’t get any help from them, but for us the Latino vote was too important and we weren’t going to wait around.” There is now a considerable list of elected positions in the county that are held by Democrats, including county recorder, sheriff, assessor and school superintendent — all in the place where the five-term Republican senator Barry Goldwater led the resurgence of the American conservative movement in the 1960s and ’70s.- Advertisement – PHOENIX — Ten years ago, Maricopa County was the place that spawned the political careers of Republican hard-liners like Joe Arpaio, the sheriff who demonized immigrants and placed inmates in a tent camp. Politicians from Phoenix and its suburbs thrived with appeals to voters on guns, religion and taxes.But these days, the county’s scorching growth has produced a battleground in which Republicans suddenly find themselves on the defensive. The children of the immigrants targeted by Mr. Arpaio, as well as an influx of outsiders from places like California, are reshaping the political landscape of this part of the West.- Advertisement – Many Democrats trace the changes that made them competitive in Maricopa County to the spate of anti-immigrant laws a decade ago that helped galvanize Latino youth in Arizona. A decade later, they have given rise to a generation of activists and elected officials.Raquel Terán, a Democratic state legislator who represents a district that encompasses parts of Phoenix and Glendale, began her political career as a field organizer fighting against anti-immigrant legislation and for workers’ rights.In 2012, she ran for office and lost by just 113 votes before resuming work as an organizer. Eventually, she became the state director for Mi Familia Vota, a national group that helps Latinos become citizens and register to vote. She decided to enter the race again in 2018, and won. This year she ran unopposed for a second term. Updated Nov. 6, 2020, 9:01 p.m. ET “We were helping people focus on our struggles, access to education, health care and jobs,” said Eduardo Sainz, state director of Mi Familia Vota.In addition to swinging the state in the presidential race, the effort led to the passage of a proposition on this year’s ballot to bolster funding for public schools by hundreds of millions of dollars each year by imposing a tax on the top 4 percent of wage earners in Arizona.Simon Romero reported from Phoenix, Miriam Jordan from Los Angeles and Michael Wines from Washington. Frances Robles contributed reporting from Miami. The shift from the old days seems jarring even to some of the Democrats involved in making it happen.Adrian Fontes, a former trial lawyer and Marine, became the first Latino elected to countywide office in Maricopa County in 2016.“I never thought I would get elected, period,” said Mr. Fontes, who now oversees elections as the county recorder after defeating a Republican incumbent who had held the seat since 1988. “I did not anticipate because of my lack of political savvy that Maricopa County would be the most important county in the most important presidential race in recent history,” he said in a recent interview.As votes in the county are counted this week, pro-Trump protesters, some of them armed with military-style rifles, have unsuccessfully demanded to be allowed in the building where the tabulation is taking place. The crowds have at times been chanting for Mr. Fontes to be recalled.Since he is also running for re-election, Mr. Fontes is staying away from both the tabulation center and his own recorder’s complex to avoid the appearance of any impropriety during the vote count. He is leading his Republican opponent in the race. Instead of leaving the state, she said, many young Latinos were energized. “It turned into a moment for folks to stand up, fight back and move past the fear to do something about it,” she said.A decade later, Ms. Maldonado, the daughter of a janitor and a teacher’s aide who immigrated to Phoenix from Mexico, is among the many children of immigrants who have built a grass-roots movement that has educated and mobilized hundreds of thousands of Latino voters.Ms. Maldonado began working with activists who mobilized in response to the anti-immigrant law.Hundreds of volunteers worked during the recent election campaign, braving 110-degree heat in face shields to engage Latinos in a “Basta Trump” (“Enough of Trump”) campaign. Others made phone calls and sent texts. “It’s the deliciousness of irony that not one of these people voted for me and we all want the exact same thing from this election: We want every valid vote counted,” he said of the protests. Various factors have contributed to the political reconfiguration, originating with the backlash — including from powerful Republicans in the Phoenix business establishment — against Arizona’s immigration crackdown in 2010. The changes began to take shape clearly by 2016, when Mr. Arpaio was defeated and Hillary Clinton lost the county by just three percentage points. “Through the years, we have been building political power,” Ms. Terán said. “And 2020 shows our work is paying off.”Another activist, Anabel Maldonado, was in high school when Arizona enacted legislation in 2010 that empowered the police to stop and question anyone they suspected of being in the country illegally, targeting undocumented immigrants in a state that had become a laboratory for such measures.Mr. Arpaio, the former sheriff, enforced the law, known as SB1070, by deploying his deputies across Maricopa County to conduct arrests and workplace raids. – Advertisement – “Right now, Maricopa is tangibly, unabashedly, demonstrably a Democratic county, something I never thought I would see in my lifetime,” said Stan Barnes, 59, a longtime Republican strategist in Phoenix. “It just blows my mind.”Even as Maricopa County’s individualistic gunslinging reputation is giving way to calls for change from its increasingly diverse electorate, it remains — like much of the country — sharply divided along political fault lines. The county’s Republicans maintain immense sway in Arizona’s state politics. Some of Mr. Trump’s most fervent supporters live in Maricopa County, reflected in the armed protesters who have been positioning themselves this week in front of the County Recorder’s voting tabulation site. – Advertisement – They accelerated in 2018 with Kyrsten Sinema’s flip of a Senate seat into Democratic hands. And they turned into a potential game-changer this week, as the county appeared to be providing a crucial boost to Mr. Biden’s bid for the presidency and Mark Kelly’s flip of yet another Senate seat held by Republicans.Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. led President Trump by about three percentage points in Maricopa County as of Friday afternoon — in a county that in 2012 saw Mitt Romney, then the Republican nominee for president, carry Maricopa County by 12 percentage points.last_img read more

What States Did Joe Biden Win and Lose

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first_imgIn Michigan, a spike in turnout in Detroit and its wealthy suburbs, along with shrinking support for Mr. Trump among middle-class voters, helped secure the state for Mr. Biden. About two-thirds of the predominately white counties that backed Mr. Trump in 2016 moved somewhat left four years later, and a greater share of voters in those counties backed Mr. Biden than they supported Mrs. Clinton in 2016.Battleground States Biden Kept After days of vote counting, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has amassed the 270 Electoral College votes he needed to secure the presidency.All along, it was clear that Mr. Biden’s path to victory involved flipping a handful of states that then-candidate Donald J. Trump won in 2016 while also retaining the states that Hillary Clinton, the Democratic nominee in 2016, won in that cycle.- Advertisement – An initial look at county-level data suggests that Mr. Biden ran ahead of Mrs. Clinton’s performance in 2016 in most parts of the state. He showed particular strength in the suburbs around Philadelphia, an area that had been trending blue in 2016 and has only grown bluer since. He flipped the state back into the Democratic column with 37,000 more votes than Mr. Trump.Michigan (16 votes) and Wisconsin (10 votes)Four years ago, Mr. Trump became the first Republican presidential candidate to win either Michigan or Wisconsin in decades when he defeated Mrs. Clinton by roughly 33,000 votes in both states combined.From the start of Mr. Biden’s presidential campaign all the way to Election Day, he and his team believed that rebuilding the Democratic “blue wall” in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania would perhaps be the clearest and cleanest path to winning the White House. Mr. Biden also believed that the Democratic Party had to garner support from working-class and middle-class voters in Northern industrial states — those from families like the one he grew up in.- Advertisement – New Hampshire (14 votes)The Cook Political Report considered New Hampshire competitive with a Democratic lean, and it was tightly contested in 2016. But Mr. Biden won handily, by seven percentage points, and the race was called relatively quickly. That strategy paid off, as Mr. Biden rode the support in Wisconsin’s cities and suburbs to victory. He was aided particularly by massive turnout in Dane County (home to Madison) and he ate into Mr. Trump’s margins in the Milwaukee suburbs. And although it took days to learn who had won and the race was quite close, Pennsylvania indeed proved critical to the outcome. As expected, Mr. Trump jumped out to an early lead, thanks to ballots cast on Election Day, but Mr. Biden clawed back slowly and eventually overtook Mr. Trump as more and more absentee ballots were counted.- Advertisement – Minnesota (10 Electoral College votes)Mr. Trump came surprisingly close to a victory in Minnesota four years ago, and his campaign poured significant resources into the state this cycle in hopes of flipping it. Nonetheless, Mr. Biden maintained a comfortable if not insurmountable lead in Minnesota throughout much of the race, and polling there ended up being pretty spot on.Mr. Biden won comfortably, by about seven percentage points. He ran up the margins in densely populated urban counties and made significant inroads in the suburban counties that Mr. Trump won in 2016.Nevada (Six votes)Mr. Biden managed to hang onto Nevada, a state Mrs. Clinton won in 2016, but it was a nail-biter that took days to decide. Like Mrs. Clinton, he did it by winning Clark and Washoe Counties, home to Las Vegas and Reno, which account for over 85 percent of the state’s total votes. His margin of victory in Clark County was down slightly from the margin in 2016, but it was up in Washoe.center_img Noteworthy States Biden Lost Though there were many twists and turns, Mr. Biden appears to have done exactly that. Here is a quick look at the key states he won, and what we know about why he won them.States Biden FlippedPennsylvania (20 Electoral College votes)Pennsylvania has been in the spotlight for months, and it was long considered a potential “tipping-point state” — the state where victory could determine the outcome of the entire presidential contest. Elections officials had signaled all along that it would take time to count the votes there, and that a final tally would not be available on election night. Mr. Trump won the state by less than one percentage point in 2016, but polls had Mr. Biden ahead in the run-up to Election Day. Updated Nov. 7, 2020, 5:08 p.m. ET Florida (29 Electoral College votes)Perhaps no state was more closely watched this cycle than Florida, and the results there almost immediately dashed Democrats’ hopes of a blue landslide. Mr. Trump won the state by a significantly wider margin than he did in 2016, despite polling averages that showed him trailing before Election Day.More than half of the counties in Florida swung further right than they did four years ago. And although Mr. Biden did make gains in some areas of the state, he vastly underperformed in Florida’s most populous county, Miami-Dade, especially in precincts with a majority Hispanic population.Iowa (six votes), Ohio (18 votes) and Texas (38 votes)Optimistic Democrats hopeful for a blue wave saw Iowa, Ohio and Texas as potentially in play this cycle, but that proved to be wishful thinking. Mr. Trump thumped Mr. Biden by significant margins in all three conservative-leaning states, winning them for a second time.Of the three, Texas, where the president won by roughly six percentage points, ended up being the closest. Even as some white voters in urban and suburban areas moved in large numbers toward Democrats, many Hispanic voters in the Rio Grande Valley shifted decisively toward Mr. Trump.Nick Corasaniti and Reid J. Epstein contributed reporting. – Advertisement –last_img read more

The Masters: Phil Mickelson excels tee to green, but rues ‘horrific putting’ | Golf News

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first_img– Advertisement – Mickelson is hitting the ball well, but not putting well Bernhard Langer is the oldest player to make the cut Bernhard Langer is the oldest player to make the cut

Ray Clemence obituary: Former England, Liverpool and Tottenham ‘keeper dies aged 72 | Football News

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first_imgOn the international front, Clemence’s battle with Shilton for the England No 1 shirt was a cause of some frustration, with the pair rotated for more than a decade. Clemence made his debut in 1972 and won his final cap in 1983. We are deeply saddened to report the passing of legendary former goalkeeper Ray Clemence.We extend our deepest sympathies to Ray’s family and many friends throughout the game at this sad time.— Tottenham Hotspur (@SpursOfficial) November 15, 2020 We’re deeply saddened by the passing of one of the greatest-ever goalkeepers, Ray Clemence. The thoughts of everyone at Liverpool Football Club are with Ray’s family and many friends.Rest in peace, Ray Clemence 1948-2020.— Liverpool FC (@LFC) November 15, 2020 I’m absolutely devastated to be told of the sad news that @RayClem1 has just passed away we were rivals but good friends Ray was a brilliant goalkeeper with a terrific sense of humour I will miss him a great deal as we’ve kept friends long after retiring RIP my friend pic.twitter.com/KwpCbtrErC— Peter Shilton (@Peter_Shilton) November 15, 2020 His biggest disappointment was missing out on a place in the starting line-up in the 1982 World Cup, effectively as a result of Tottenham’s FA Cup final replay with QPR which prevented him featuring in two pre-tournament friendlies.He rated his save from Borussia Monchengladbach’s Uli Stielike in the 1977 European Cup final with the score at 1-1 as his most important.However, the goal he is most associated with was Scotland’s second in their 2-1 victory at Hampden Park in 1976 when Liverpool team-mate Kenny Dalglish steered it between his legs.“Gordon Banks is remembered for his save against Pele and I’m remembered for that,” he said ruefully. – Advertisement – “I remember telling my parents my big chance had just gone straight out the window,” Clemence recalled. “That summer, because I was still on only £11 a week, I took a job on the deckchairs at Skegness beach.”A few weeks later, while at his summer job, he spotted a man running towards him.“My mum had phoned the council to send someone to find me. She’d had a call from the club to say Scunthorpe had agreed a fee with Liverpool and it was up to me if I wanted to go.“My life changed at that moment, as I’m standing there stacking deckchairs.” After being rejected as a schoolboy by Notts County, he arrived at Scunthorpe as a 17-year-old in 1965 but in his fourth game as a professional let in seven against local rivals Grimsby.Nevertheless, within two years he had attracted the interest of Liverpool, a club about to embark on one of the greatest spells of success in the history of the game.His last appearance for Scunthorpe in 1967, though, saw them lose 3-0 to Doncaster, with Shankly present to see Clemence be at fault for two of the goals. The only thing he would stack up after that were trophies and accolades.After serving his apprenticeship in the Central League, he took over from Tommy Lawrence on a permanent basis during the 1969-70 season, despite being assured by Shankly when he signed that Lawrence was “over the hill and past his best”.But it was worth the wait as Clemence won every major honour in the game bar the European Cup Winners’ Cup in 665 appearances before, surprisingly, announcing at the age of 32 that he needed a new challenge to prolong his career.He moved to Tottenham in 1981 and did just that, playing for a further seven years and making 330 appearances for the north London club. Ray Clemence went from stacking deckchairs on Skegness beach to being the last line of defence in the all-conquering Liverpool team of the 1970s and early 1980s.An £18,000 signing from Scunthorpe, Clemence helped Liverpool win five First Division titles and three European Cups during 11 years as first choice at Anfield in which he remarkably missed only six league matches.- Advertisement – “I couldn’t play anywhere else. I never wanted to be a goalkeeper. The sports master nominated me to go into goal. When I went into goal, it was just natural for me to do,” said Clemence, who is survived by wife Veronica, son Stephen – a former player and now a coach – and daughters Sarah and Julie. We are extremely saddened to learn that former #ThreeLions goalkeeper and coach Ray Clemence has passed away at the age of 72.All of our thoughts are with Ray’s family, friends and former clubs at this time. pic.twitter.com/VfMLuhH8zw— England (@England) November 15, 2020 Clemence played 240 times for Tottenham. Credit: David Cannon/Allsport
Image:Clemence moved to Tottenham in 1981 after deciding he wanted to leave Liverpool for a new challenge As well as the league titles and European Cup successes, Clemence also won an FA Cup, a League Cup, two UEFA Cups and the European Super Cup, but his contribution was much greater than the sum of his honours.And all that after having been reluctant to play in goal in the first place.Born in Skegness on August 5, 1948, a nine-year-old Clemence started as a centre-forward, but was a defender in his early teens before, one day, Lumley Secondary Modern’s school team found themselves short of a ‘keeper.- Advertisement – Clemence played in three European Cup finals for LiverpoolImage:Clemence won European Cups with Liverpool The former England international, who conceded just 16 goals in the 42-match 1978-79 season, played more than 1,100 games for Scunthorpe, Liverpool, Tottenham and the national team over a 23-year career.Clemence, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2005 and also had treatment for a brain tumour, died on Sunday at the age of 72.Signed by Bill Shankly in 1967, Clemence was the greatest goalkeeper to play for Liverpool and arguably the best of his generation, despite his international competition with Peter Shilton which saw his rival win 125 caps to his 61. Ray Clemence
Image:Ray Clemence spent 17 years as part of the backroom staff with the England team – Advertisement – He helped them win the FA Cup in 1982 and the UEFA Cup two years later, although he was a spectator for their final victory over Anderlecht as stand-in Tony Parks proved Spurs’ penalty shoot-out hero.Clemence hung up his gloves for good in 1988 and joined the Tottenham coaching staff.He also had a spell in charge of Barnet before, in 1996, joining the England coaching team under Glenn Hoddle. He remained part of the backroom staff until his retirement in 2013.last_img read more

What’s Your FACE customizable LED mask lets you become any character of your choice » Gadget Flow

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first_imgDesigned for self-expression, the What’s Your FACE customizable LED mask lets you become any character you choose. Offering 2,000 full-color built-in LEDs, it can present the image of any character you download from the internet. You could choose the face of a superhero that you find online. And then all you have to do is send it to this customizable LED mask! Simply download the app on your smartphone, sync it to your LED mask, and get creative! This USB-chargeable mask is easy to use all day long thanks to its 12-hour battery life. Not interested in being a character? You can write text on your mask instead, and you can coordinate any look with the music equalizer effect using music on your phone. Decide who you want to be in the moment with the What’s Your FACE mask. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Avian flu reported in Siberian poultry deaths

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first_imgJul 22, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A news report from Russia today said that an H5 strain of avian influenza has killed hundreds of poultry in Siberia, though a Russian report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) said the disease was still unidentified.The outbreak was reported in the Novosibirsk region of southwestern Siberia. If it turns out to be H5N1 avian flu, it will mark the virus’s first known extension into Russia and Central Asia. The virus has plagued much of Southeast and East Asia since late 2003 and infected more than 100 people, killing at least 55.The outbreak was described as an H5 avian flu in a report from the Russian news service Newsru.com, which quoted Alexander Shestopalov, head of the zoonoses laboratory at the State Scientific Center for Virology and Biotchechnology (“Vector”). (The report was translated and published by ProMED Mail, a service of the International Society for Infectious Diseases.)”Further serotyping of the virus is expected today Fri, 22 Jul 2005,” Shestopalov was quoted as saying.Meanwhile, the OIE published an alert today from another Russian official saying that more than 350 poultry in Siberia have died of a disease that could be avian influenza.Dr. Evgueny A. Nepoklonov, head of the Russian Ministry of Agriculture and Food’s main veterinary department, reported that the outbreak has killed geese, ducks, turkeys, and chickens in five villages in the Novosibirsk region.”Some clinical signs allow suspecting that the outbreak is caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI),” the report says. “However, some details of the outbreak are not typical for HPAI (no evident species specificity, and the pattern of spreading within a settlement).” He said laboratory test results were expected tomorrow.According to the Newsru.com report, the Russian Emergency Situations Ministry said today that more than 500 birds died in the outbreak, including 300 in one district and 240 in another. Officials said no human cases have been found.Because of the outbreak, the chief sanitary inspector for Moscow said today that authorities would stop food shipments from the Novosibirsk region to other parts of Russia, according to a MosNews.com report today.Nepoklonov’s report to the OIE said the poultry began showing signs of illness Jul 15 and began dying Jul 18. The birds were in “non-commercial premises of open type,” he said.Yesterday, other Russian officials asserted and denied that an H5 virus had been identified in the outbreak, according to reports from MosNews.com and Reuters.MosNews.com quoted Viktor Beltsov, a spokesman for Russia’s Emergencies Ministry, as saying that an investigation “showed the presence of the AH5-type bird flu virus.”But Reuters reported that Sergei Dankvert, the country’s chief animal and plant safety officer, would not confirm that. “The reason behind the accident could be bad water, feed poisoning, Newcastle disease or bird flu,” he said.The chief veterinary officer for the Novosibirsk region, Muhamed Amirokov, said today that samples from dead birds were being tested by several laboratories and that results were expected in 3 to 4 days, according to a Reuters report. “As of today, we have no proof that we have bird flu,” he said.See also:ProMED mail posting with translation of Newsru.com reportlast_img read more

Provider issue vexes drive to boost flu-shot coverage

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first_imgMay 14, 2008 – ATLANTA (CIDRAP News) – The drive to increase the number of Americans who get vaccinated against influenza may stumble on disagreements within medicine and public health over where vaccination should take place.Over several hours Tuesday, participants at the annual National Influenza Vaccine Summit struggled with the competing goals of getting shots and nasal sprays into as many patients as possible, while protecting the investments of the patients’ regular doctors and the entrepreneurship of alternative vaccination sites.Doctors’ representatives complained that vaccine orders appear to go first to large-scale vaccination programs that draw away patients. But community and alternative vaccinators replied that some physician practices are referring patients to public health clinics in order to avoid the uncompensated discussion time needed to deal with patients’ fears of vaccines.Meanwhile, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a new program that it hopes will stimulate public confidence in flu vaccine, by encouraging healthcare workers within HHS to take the nasal spray or shot.’Medical home’ versus maximum coverageThe debate over where vaccination takes place centers on the concept of a “medical home,” an idea that was advanced by the Institute of Medicine in 2001 and described in a 2007 white paper signed by four medical associations. That paper recommends that a single physician take responsibility for delivering a patient’s care, monitoring the network of other providers the patient deals with, and collecting all reports about the patient into a single record.The goal is to avoid fragmentation. But flu vaccination challenges that concept because it is deliberately delivered in a fragmented manner, via doctors’ offices, public clinics, pharmacies, workplace campaigns, grocery stores and other sites. That ad hoc system developed, with health authorities’ approval, to ease the pressure of administering large amounts of vaccine in a short period of time. But summit participants said the unintended consequence has been to steer at least information and in some cases patients away from primary care physicians.”We all value the medical home, we want patients cared for in a medical home, but statistics . . . show that 48% of family practice [physicians] will refer outside of the medical home to public health” for vaccination, said Patricia Stinchfield of the Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, who spoke on behalf of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Describing a late-season rush to vaccination following several deaths from flu in Minnesota, she said, “People went to their medical home and their medical home said, ‘We did that in October, so find someplace else.'”A deep-rooted misconceptionVaccinations are not taking place because patients and medical staff alike think of flu vaccine as something given only in the fall, according to several participants at the meeting, which drew 230 people.”I have to fight my staff every month,” said Dr. Kim Dixon, an internist at St. Peter’s University Hospital in New Jersey. “In January, the nurses sent all the vaccine vials back to the central pharmacy from our clinic site and I told them to get them back. In February, it was the same thing.”The summit was founded in 2001 following a vaccine shortage to give flu vaccination’s many participants—public health, clinical medicine, manufacturers, and distributors, among others—a chance to express frustration and work out strategies. The shortage problem has since vanished: Last year manufacturers delivered a record number of doses, and 19% of them went unused. But the frustration over uneven distribution remains.”If I don’t have the vaccine Oct. 1 but a retail organization down the street has it, and I have a patient who wants flu vaccination, they will go down the street,” Dixon said. “And that is fine, because they should be vaccinated. But now I have a vaccine for a patient who is not going to get it in my practice. It is a really hard thing each year, especially when we can’t count on a firm delivery date, to figure out how much vaccine will be utilized.”About half of the vaccine sold in the United States each year is sold directly by the manufacturers, with the other half passing through 15 to 20 middlemen, according to Andrew van Ostrand of the Health Industry Distributors Association. But the new vaccine does not flow evenly into the marketplace: Once distribution begins, manufacturers may release anywhere from 1 to 39 lots of 400,000 to 500,000 doses each week.Who should get first shipments?There have been persistent complaints through the years over who appears to receive vaccine first, with doctors saying they should get first choice because they see the patients at highest risk of flu complications. But that may not be true: 10% of vaccine given in workplace programs goes to high-risk patients, said Roslyn Stone, chief operating officer of Corporate Wellness, Inc.”The best data that we have shows that high-risk patients are getting served in a wide variety of places,” said Dr. Jeanne Santoli of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “We have gone on record with the manufacturers and distributors, asking that they treat all the types of providers as equitably as possible . . . so that vaccination can start everywhere” as close to the same time as possible.Some summit participants urged new outreach efforts, such as offering vaccination to family members who pick up prescriptions for others or bring elderly parents or pregnant women for appointments, and one described offering shots for cash to the parents of pediatric patients. But “the biggest barrier is reimbursement,” said Mitchel Rothholz, chief of staff of the American Pharmacists Association. “From the pharmacy perspective, it is getting recognized to be a provider for those patients. And a pediatrician may not be seen by a third-party payer as someone who can treat an adult patient.”Persuading healthcare workersWith so much vaccine going unused, several groups are turning their attention to boosting public confidence in the flu vaccine. Some called for an easily recognizable symbol that could be worn by recipients, similar to breast-cancer ribbons or “I voted” stickers. But others said the best promotion for flu shots and nasal sprays would be for patients to hear that their own caregivers have received it—something that often cannot be said now because, according to the CDC, only 42% of healthcare workers get vaccinated against flu.Unvaccinated healthcare workers may not realize they are a risk to their patients, said Dr. Donald Wright, principal deputy assistant secretary for health at HHS—but studies show that one in four unvaccinated workers contracts flu each year. Fewer than half of them recall being sick, suggesting they could have transmitted flu without knowing they were contagious.Wright said surveys show that healthcare workers have the same mistaken beliefs about flu shots and nasal sprays as the general population: They fear it will cause side effects, or think they do not need it because they are healthy or not at risk. So HHS will launch a program later this year to persuade health care workers to be vaccinated, starting with its own personnel. The goal will be to raise the vaccination rate to 60% by 2010, he said.See also: February 2007 report “Joint Principles of the Patient Centered Medical Home”http://www.aap.org/en-us/professional-resources/practice-support/quality-improvement/pages/Joint-Principles-of-the-Patient-Centered-Medical-Home.aspxlast_img read more

WHO: H1N1 flu more contagious than seasonal virus

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first_img A reporter asked him if the WHO could come up with something like the US government’s “Pandemic Severity Index,” which was inspired by hurricane classifications. The reporter said the public is confused because the world is in phase 5 with a “mild” virus, in the context of pandemic preparations triggered by the often-lethal H5N1 avian flu virus. “H1N1 appears to be more contagious than seasonal influenza,” the WHO said in an online statement released today. “The secondary attack rate of seasonal influenza ranges from 5% to 15%. Current estimates of the secondary attack rate of H1N1 range from 22% to 33%.” (The secondary attack rate is defined as the frequency of new cases of a disease among the contacts of known cases.) May 11, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today said the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) virus seems to be more contagious than seasonal flu, but it generally causes “very mild illness” in otherwise healthy people. He said that providing severity information has been “an active part of the pandemic preparedness thinking” in recent years, but he gave no details about what kind of system the WHO might come up with or when it would be unveiled. The statement also noted that the outbreaks in Mexico and the United States have affected younger people more than seasonal flu typically does: “Though cases have been confirmed in all age groups, from infants to the elderly, the youth of patients with severe or lethal infections is a striking feature of these early outbreaks.” May 11 WHO statement “In the past few weeks we’ve been asked, is this a mild event? The response is that we are not sure right now. The situation is evolving,” said Fukuda, the WHO’s assistant director-general for health security and environment. Phase 5, which the WHO declared on Apr 29, means that sustained community transmission is occurring in more than one country in one global region. Phase 6 means a full-scale pandemic, with community transmission going on in more than one region. The WHO says that has not happened yet: While countries such as Spain and the United Kingdom have dozens of cases, they have been limited to school and institutional settings and have not escaped into the wider community. But in response to questions, he said there is no specific number of cases that signals community spread. “What you’re really looking for is something that’s convincing. . . not something that’s just a quirk or an oddity,” he said. “We’re very mindful that going from phase 5 to phase 6 is a very important step and it really would be interpreted that way. I can’t tell you whether that’s 10 people or 100 people or so on.” The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced its Pandemic Severity Index in February 2007 as part of its guidance on community interventions for combating a pandemic. The index is based on case-fatality rates (CFRs), with a CFR of 2% or greater signaling the most severe pandemic: category 5. The pandemics of 1957 and 1968 qualify as category 2 events, with CFRs between 0.1% and 0.5%, HHS officials said. “Now severity is a different characteristic,” Fukuda said. The severity of an epidemic can refer to the incidence of mild, moderate, or severe illness, and it can also refer to the overall social and economic impact of an outbreak on a country, he said.center_img Pandemic phases versus severityMuch of today’s WHO statement, titled “Assessing the severity of an influenza pandemic,” explained the numerous variables that affect the severity of a pandemic. It was released the same day that Dr. Keiji Fukuda, speaking at a press briefing, took pains to explain that the WHO’s pandemic alert phases do not describe the severity of an outbreak but refer only to how widely the disease has spread. See also: Although WHO officials have been careful not to characterize the severity of the H1N1 situation, the agency is working on a system to help provide that kind of information, Fukuda said. Defining community spreadIn other comments today, Fukuda said the criterion for “community spread” of a disease is “when you begin to see people who are getting infected and you’re just not clear where they’re getting infected from.” He added that many US cases can’t be traced anywhere, unlike the cases in school and institutional outbreaks. The agency noted that, because the virus is new, scientists expect that few people are likely to have any immunity to it. In that context, the statement that the new virus is more contagious than seasonal flu is not surprising, but it appears to be the first time the WHO has offered any specific figures comparing the contagiousness of the novel virus and seasonal flu. The WHO further stated, “With the exception of the outbreak in Mexico, which is still not fully understood, the H1N1 virus tends to cause very mild illness in otherwise healthy people. Outside Mexico, nearly all cases of illness, and all deaths, have been detected in people with underlying chronic conditions.” The WHO statement goes into more detail. It says the virulence of the virus largely determines the number of severe illnesses and deaths, but many other factors influence the overall severity, including the contagiousness of the virus, the age distribution of cases, the prevalence of chronic health problems and malnutrition in a population, viral mutations, the number of waves of illness, and the quality of health services. Fukuda replied, “WHO, with the same group of people who have been working on phases and on pandemic preparedness plans, has been working on developing a way to grade severity. We have refrained at this point as to posting whether we think it’s a mild stage or medium or severe. I think we will be trying to provide this guidance as soon as we can.” Feb 1, 2007, CIDRAP News story “HHS ties pandemic mitigation advice to severity”last_img read more

Pandemic declaration prompts CDC huddle with businesses

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first_imgJun 12, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – On the heels of yesterday’s pandemic declaration by the World Health Organization (WHO), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today urged businesses to review their pandemic plans to make sure they’re flexible enough to respond to a moderate or severe pandemic.At a teleconference today for the business community, Lisa Koonin, MN, MPH, a senior adviser with the CDC’s influenza coordination unit, said that because influenza viruses are so unpredictable and the pandemic may change or become more severe in the fall, now is the time for businesses to revise pandemic plans or begin developing one if they don’t already have one. About 680 people called in for the conference.Anthony Fiore, MD, MPH, a medical epidemiologist in the CDC’s influenza division, said the novel flu cases and hospitalizations are hitting younger people and children the hardest. “This is much of the workforce, as well as their children,” he said.He warned that a vaccine against the new virus, if successfully developed, won’t be available until October or later and probably won’t be distributed through typical commercial channels. Fiore advised businesses to plan on using basic preventive measures as a fallback, such as encouraging employees to stay home when they’re sick, cover their coughs, and wash their hands frequently.Employees who have risk factors for flu complications, such as asthma, cardiac conditions, or pregnancy, should be advised to seek medical care quickly if they have flu symptoms, he said. Those who don’t have risk factors and experience severe symptoms should also seek care.Koonin reminded companies that the WHO’s pandemic declaration wasn’t based on severity, but on sustained transmission levels indifferent parts of the world. However, she advised groups to be alert for new flu developments by seeking out situation updates from local, state, and national public health agencies, which will help businesses align their practices with public health recommendations. She warned that the novel virus will affect different locations in different ways.”There will be different pictures all around the world,” Koonin said. “We need to be nimble and tailor our response based on that picture.”Employers should review their leave, pay, and benefits policies to determine if any adjustments are needed to allow employees to stay home for 7 to 10 days if they are sick with the novel flu or need to stay home to care for a sick family member, she said.Flexibility with policies will be crucial, Koonin said. For example, employers may not want to require a doctor’s note when workers have been home sick, because clinics and emergency departments will likely be swamped, making it difficult for sick people to get notes in a timely manner.She advised the group to address business continuity concerns by identifying essential business functions and critical employees, planning for staffing redundancy for key positions, and assessing supply-chain and critical input issues. Koonin added that it’s a good idea for businesses to ask suppliers to provide details about their pandemic plans.During a question and answer period, representatives from several businesses said they need more guidance on severity to help them assess and revise their pandemic plans. The CDC officials said they expect the WHO to issue some severity guidance soon, but in the meanwhile business can use a severity scale, based on case-fatality ratio, that was included in the CDC’s2007 community mitigation guidance. They said the current severity level would be 2, roughly equivalent to the 1957 pandemic.Some businesses also asked the CDC for clearer guidance on how long people with novel flu infections should stay home before returning to work. Fiore said the current guidance, issued out of an abundance of caution but without much scientific data, is 7 days or 24 hours after symptoms resolve, whichever is longer.He said the CDC is actively examining its recommendation on how long to stay home and hopes to update its guidance within the next few weeks.See also:Feb 2007 interim community pandemic mitigation guidancelast_img read more

Jadran dd from Crikvenica buys Club Adriatic?

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first_imgCERP received a binding offer for the purchase of business shares of CLUB ADRIATIC dooPursuant to the State Property Management Act and the Decision of the Governing Board of the Center for Restructuring and Sales (CERP) on the initial price and implementation of the procedure of public collection of binding bids for the purchase of CLUB ADRIATIC doo, Zagreb on July 26, 2018, a public procedure was initiated collection of binding offers for the purchase of business shares, with a starting price of HRK 48.500.000,00 for business shares that are the subject of the sale.During the public bidding process for the purchase of 3 business shares of the Company, 2 bid documents were purchased, and one binding bid was submitted by the following bidder: JADRAN dd, Crikvenica, Bana Jelačića 16. The company JADRAN dd, Crikvenica offered a price of 50.500.000,00 HRK .XNUMX for the Company’s business shares that are the subject of the sale. By the way, the owners of Jadran dd are the Pension Funds PBZ CO dd and Erste doo, which became the majority owners in the middle of this year.Back in April this year, Club Adriatic was “owned” by the company Immo Invest Partner AG, whose offer was accepted and the handover agreement was signed, but a number of creditors after accepting the offer demanded default interest for the last three years. conflicts with the obligations of the pre-bankruptcy settlement, and thus the entire settlement failed.Club Adriatic consists of the Hotel and Annex Alem in Baška Voda and the camp in Baško polje. The hotel has 99 double rooms and 9 double suites, and annexes 198 double rooms with extra bed. Camp Basko polje, which is categorized with three stars, has 600 camping places-pitches, 17 bungalows with kitchens and 16 mobile homesIf the offer is accepted, it would finally successfully complete the privatization process of Club Adriatic doo, 17 years after the former Croatian Privatization Fund, the legal predecessor of CERP, established it with the aim of bringing former military resorts, hotels and camps to tourism. .RELATED NEWS:TRADE UNION OF ISTRIA, KVARNER AND DALMATIA: ABSURD SITUATION IN CLUB ADRIATIC, IF IT WASN’T TRAGIC, IT WOULD BE FUNNYPBZ CO AND ERSTE PENSION FUNDS TAKE OVER THE ADRIATIC, GORAN FABRIS NEW PRESIDENT OF THE MANAGEMENT BOARDlast_img read more