Month: January 2021

BP holds ‘Meal or no Meal’ auction

Posted on

first_imgFor the past 25 years, the annual Breen-Phillips meal auction has allowed students to see professors, athletes and other campus celebrities in a new light by auctioning off meals with these various Notre Dame personalities. This year’s event will continue thattradition.Tonight’s “Meal or No Meal” auction will include live and silent auctions, and all proceeds from the event support Meals on Wheels, a charity that delivers meals to homebound senior citizens. Students can bid on dinners with a variety of prominent members of the Notre Dame community, such as University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, Irish football coach Brian Kelly, Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Mark Poorman, student body president Grant Schmidt and student body vice president Cynthia Weber.In addition to the live auction, a silent auction will feature gift cards from several area restaurants, including Chipotle, Olive Garden and Hot Box Pizza. It will also include six gift baskets assembled by each section of Breen-Phillips. Each will have a unique theme, such as “Death by Chocolate” and “Luck of the Irish.”In order to offer students a variety of meals to bid on, event coordinators Susan Garabedian and Adriana Taylor, both sophomores, contacted regular participants and prospective personalities via e-mail during winter break. They also asked other residents of Breen-Phillips for names of popular professors to provide a good sampling from each college, Taylor said.According to Taylor and Garabedian, the campus celebrities decide how many students to take to dinner, where they will have the meal and how much they want to spend per plate. Some participants, such as Carolyn Woo, dean of the Mendoza College of Business, and Anre Venter, professor of psychology, treat students to home-cooked, ethnic meals, while others take winners out to expensive restaurants, including Sorin’s.Poorman traditionally gives students a tour of the Main Building and the tunnels around campus. A new offering this year is a meal in Chicago with Professor Candida Moss of the Program of Liberal Studies.“Certain meals earn a lot of money because of the number of students involved, whereas others make money because the meals are expensive,” Taylor said. “It’s a good way for people to donate money to a great cause while getting to see another side of professors and other people on campus.”Garabedian said the off-campus restaurants were willing to make generous gift card donations to the event.“The donations from Chipotle are like Christmas in February,” she said.Garabedian and Taylor said they were happy about the number of new and returning  participants. “It’s very cool to see people at Notre Dame being so willing to participate in the event,” Taylor said. “It shows the amazing generosity on campus, and everyone is willing to help, from students to professors.”Professor Jim McKenna, chair of the anthropology department, and his wife, Professor Joanne Mack, traditionally take students to LaSalle Grille in South Bend for an evening of food and conversation.“We love every minute of it and the students we meet become our friends,” McKenna said. “It is just another wonderful reminder of the way Notre Dame, through its good works, helps us break the barriers between our students and us, the faculty.”Venter, who treats students to a traditional South African meal at his home, agreed with McKenna’s view of the event’s impact on student-professor relationships.“It is a great opportunity to get to know students, and we have been able to develop some wonderful relationships,” Venter said. “I think it is good for students and faculty to engage outside the constraints of the typical settings on campus.”Schmidt said he was surprised at his identification as a “campus celebrity” but nonetheless voiced his enthusiasm about the event.“Coach Kelly, Fr. Poorman, Professor McKenna and more blow us out of the water,” Schmidt said. “But we will be sure to take whoever is kind enough to bid on us to a very delicious meal and we’re looking forward to helping out.”The live and silent auctions will take place tonight from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in Burger King and the Sorin Room in LaFortune. Students may pay for meals with cash, check or the new Domer Dollars option for charity events.last_img read more

Seniors reflect during retreat

Posted on

first_imgWith seven semesters behind them and one to go, more than 150 seniors will spend time reflecting on their Notre Dame experiences at the Senior Retreat this weekend, according to head organizer and senior Erin Connors. “It’s going to be a great weekend,” she said. “We’re focusing on how to cherish the last five months of our senior year beyond the last things to check off the ‘bucket list.’” Connors has been planning the retreat with senior Andrew Bell and 18 other students since Oct. 30. The retreat begins at 3:30 p.m. today and concludes Saturday evening with a closing dinner. “This is an opportunity to reflect on the last three and a half years,” Bell said. “Some reflections will be shared by the planning team to start conversation in small groups.” Bell said in planning, the team considered what seniors needed as their time at Notre Dame drew to a close. “It’s been interesting planning parts of a retreat knowing they’re for our friends and classmates, and, at the same time, for us. At the heart of what we’re hoping for is to provide an opportunity to pause when we’re at a time as seniors that everyone is telling you to go, go — to hurry,” Bell said. “It’s a moment to pause and reflect on changes.” While this year’s retreat follows a general pattern set by the past six retreats, the content is new because the planning team is different, said Fr. Joe Carey, the interim director of Campus Ministry. Carey led the Senior Retreat for the last six sessions, though Senior Retreats have occurred on campus since the 1970s. “It makes me proud to be at Notre Dame,” he said. “It’s different every year because of the team. It’s [a new retreat] in that it’s [the planning committee’s] experiences – they really capture all of the things Notre Dame students face.” In the past, the retreat has been career-focused, with alumni speaking on life after college, Carey said. The aim for the last few years has been for a more spiritual exploration. “This year we have added a talk that two people are giving on gratitude. We want attendees to see who to be thankful for,” he said. “The retreat is starting a process of reflection through this weekend, the next four months and beyond.” Carey assembled the planning committee over the summer, purposefully picking leaders he felt could bring together a successful retreat. “It’s seniors leading seniors,” he said. “We were gathering a team of student leaders, and we came up with a team from various facets of Notre Dame that will enable attendees to grow.” In addition to this weekend’s retreat, three more Notre Dame Encounters and two Freshman Retreats will happen before the school year’s end, Carey said. “They have a different feeling than this retreat — and anyone can participate in the Notre Dame Encounters,” he said. “They are also smaller, with the limit set at 50 people.” More information on the retreats is available at campusministry.nd.edu.last_img read more

Club encourages daily exercise

Posted on

first_imgOne million steps. WalkND, Notre Dame’s official and free walking club, challenged members of the Notre Dame community this fall to don pedometers and walk that many steps in 100 days in exchange for weekly giveaways and better health. Conner Edelbrock, fitness intern at RecSports, said the challenge helped grow the club this year. “One of our goals is to reach a wider audience of people participating in walking every single day,” Edelbrock said. WalkND has 362 members, Edelbrock said, and is open to faculty, students, staff and their spouses. Over 50 percent of the members are faculty and staff, while students form 25 percent of the club. “The big incentive program for the fall semester was 1,000,000 steps in 100 days, [which is] 10,000 steps a day,” she said. “We’ve had a lot of success with it.” WalkND also recently collaborated with the Humane Society of St. Joseph County to connect walkers with over 60 dogs that need exercise. There will be an information session this Friday at the Humane Society at 5 p.m. for students interested in volunteering. Jennifer Phillips, assistant director of fitness at RecSports, said the club started when Human Resources offered to subsidize the pedometers and log books two years ago. RecSports is responsible for the administrative work and organizing the program’s events and incentives, she said. “Walking is something most people can do,” Phillips said. “It’s a simple way for people to improve their health. We wanted to at least put a more structured program out there, where it was simple for people to do it on their own. It doesn’t cost anything. … We just provide the structure, motivation and education about walking as an exercise.” To increase their step quota, members can park farther away in the parking lot, take the stairs or walk to the post office on campus, Phillips said. “[We are] just helping people with being more creative in incorporating exercise into their day,” she said. “The beauty of walking is you just need to put on a pair of shoes and walk out your front door. You don’t need to pack a bag. You don’t need to take a shower after necessarily. You don’t have to spend a lot of money. You don’t have to take up your lunch hour.” She also said off-campus locations are good alternatives to the routes available around campus, such as the Dunes National Lake Shore or the parks along St. Joseph River. “I would highly recommend going over to Lake Michigan,” she said. “You feel like you’re in a totally different world. There are cute little beach towns, like New Buffalo and St. Joseph and great restaurants, and you can walk along the beach.” Phillips said research has shown people can start seeing improvement in their health when they walk 10,000 steps a day, which is about five miles for the average adult. “They can see improvements like a drop in blood pressure, maybe a drop in cholesterol, improved sleeping, improved concentration levels or improved immunity functions.”last_img read more

Saint Mary’s announces new Dean of Faculty

Posted on

first_imgVickie Lynne Hess, a native of New York and previous academic dean of the American International College in Massachusetts, has been named Saint Mary’s new dean of faculty, the College announced in a press release Aug. 20. According to the release, Hess received her bachelor’s degree in physics and chemistry from Mount Holyoke College and then pursued a doctorate in chemistry at Indiana University. “I am delighted that our search process brought us Dean Hess,” Senior Vice President and Provost Patricia Fleming said in a press release. “At this juncture in higher education, her prior experience as dean, as well as her background in science, will stand us in good stead. Increasingly more women are coming to us wishing to major in one of the sciences, math or nursing. Vickie understands the complexity of those curriculums. I am grateful to the faculty search committee for urging me to include her as a finalist in our search.” Under the general supervision of Fleming, the dean of faculty oversees curriculum and personnel dealings for all of the current undergraduate departments, interdisciplinary programs and special programs, Hess said. “Different programs around campus will be reporting to me,” Hess said. “I am really going to be looking at questions of faculty load. How much teaching are our faculty members expected to do, and what exactly does this teaching look like? Different disciplines have different ways of teaching, and I believe it is important to know and communicate these differences.” Hess said library faculty, the College’s Writing Center, the Center for Academic Initiatives and the section of the Academic Affairs Office that deals with advising will also report to her. With the College implementing a pilot honors program and a learning outcomes-based curriculum called the Sophia Program, Hess said she looks forward to working with the faculty to continue pushing forward College President Carol Mooney’s initiatives. Hess said in recent years, the public has asked higher education institutions for more accountability. In response, Hess plans to work with faculty to create more academic assessments. “The public wants to know what we are doing,” Hess said. “Academic assessments on departments and curriculum are faculty-led efforts, but someone needs to provide the structure to let it happen.” As a product of a single-sex institution, President Mooney said Dean Hess knows what Saint Mary’s is about and will be a great asset to the community. “Today, we are a pretty unique place,” Mooney said. “She has had similar experiences, so she appreciates what we are about here at Saint Mary’s.” Hess said studying science at Mount Holyoke made her realize how important and necessary institutions are that aim to empower women. “I remember being at the American Chemical Society national meeting with my adviser my senior year at Mount Holyoke, and there were times I looked around the room and I was the only woman and I didn’t even have a bachelor’s degree yet,” Hess said. “That is when I realized for the first time I was going into a ‘man’s field.’” Because she studied at a liberal arts institution, Hess said she can easily connect with Saint Mary’s and will continue to promote the importance of teaching Saint Mary’s women not only what they can do, but what they can become. “We are not just functions, we are human beings,” Hess said. “We have to prepare our students not for what is out there today, but for things they are going to have to learn down the road.” Yesterday marked the first day of the academic calendar, and Hess said she is excited for the campus to continue to buzz with students. “I am thrilled to be here,” Hess said. “I am excited about the warmth of the community. From the very first day, the community has reached out to me, and I feel very much at home.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

Saint Mary’s Senate allocates club funds

Posted on

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s senate met Wednesday to discuss this year’s objectives and budgets for the College’s student organizations.Senior student body president McKenna Schuster chairs the SMC senate, which is the only voting body on campus. The Senate’s main responsibility is to ensure each club and sports team receives adequate funding.Senior vice president of finance Marissa Pie said each of the College’s 54 recognized student groups begins with a budget of $100, and athletic clubs receive $1,000.Student groups also have the chance to apply for travel grants and sponsorships, Schuster said.The Council of Clubs, which is composed of presidents from each student club and group, approves all sponsorship funds, Pie said.This year, Schuster said one of the Senate’s main objectives is to keep the student body updated about its decisions and actions.“In order to be transparent and keep the student body informed, we are emphasizing the importance of town-hall style meetings,” she said.The Senate also aims to simplify the budget for recognized clubs and sports teams and make it more comprehensive and available to the student body, Schuster said. There were some concerns with the allocation of last year’s funds, she said.“We formed this year’s budget after carefully analyzing last year’s budget,” Shuster said. “A great amount of thought and research was put into this year’s allocations.”The senate also hopes to create incentives for students to participate in school events and spirit weeks, such as the Navy Dance and Love Your Body Week.Schuster said she would like to see increased attendance at athletic competitions, social events and lectures.“Students will receive a punch card to record their attendance at various events,” she said. “When the punch card is filled out, prizes will be offered. It’s a fun incentive.”Tags: Budget, Council of Clubs, Saint Mary’s Senatelast_img read more

Lecture explores Islamic binaries

Posted on

first_imgKroc Institute Luce Visiting Professor of Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding SherAli Tareen delivered a lecture titled “Beyond Good Muslim/Bad Muslim: Debating the Boundaries of Innovation in Islam” on Tuesday afternoon at the Hesburgh Center for International Studies. Tareen focused on polemics over the ethical question of “bid’a,” or heretical innovation, among two major modern Muslim reform movements in South Asia: the Deobandis and Barelvis. The lecture began with a brief overview of the two major reform movements: the Deobandis and the Barelvis. Tareen said both are Sunni groups in India and that, being so similar, it made the polemics “bitter and more caustic because they were so personal.” He elaborated on the groups and explained how the two are usually assigned to a binary with the stereotypically more law-focused Deobandis on one end and the stereotypically more peaceful and mystical Barelvis on the other.“This kind of binary is intimately intertwined with the larger discourse of, which today is a very insidious and well-funded discourse, of what we might call the good Muslim-bad Muslim discourse,” he said. “Goodness is often measured by what is most proximate to a modern Western interpretation of what is a legitimate religion and, frankly, what is most conducive to American foreign policy at that moment in time.” Tareen said innovation in Islam refers to changes within Islam itself.“‘Bid’a,’ or heretical innovation, is the inverse of what is known as the normative model of the prophet, or sunna,” he said. “‘Bid’a’ consists of new, unsanctioned practices.” To explain the differences in the Deobandi and Barelvi definitions of “bid’a,” Tareen used the definitions as defined by two Hanafi Muslim jurists and Sufi masters who were involved in the founding of both groups. Quoting Ashraf ‘Ali Thanvi, one of the founders of the Deoband Madrasa, Tareen said, “Bid’a” is an innovated practice in religion that simulates the “sharia” in the intensity and discipline in which it is undertaken. “In other words, such conventions were kept alive and perpetuated by the invisible pressure to societal expectations and norms, rather than to divine law and divine will,” Tareen said. He added something can be considered heretical when it’s treated as being obligatory without a historical context to back it up. Tareen also read an extract from the writings of Ahmad Raza Khan, the founder of the Deobandi school, on “Bid’a,” which compared Islam to Muhammad’s garden which he said becomes “blanketed with breathtaking flowers, leaves and fountains, as each generation of scholars and saints added new layers of beauty to what they had inherited from their predecessors.” “Unless a practice was forbidden in Muslim law, ‘sharia,’ that practice is permissible,” Tareen said. “In other words, the default value of practices that have not been explicitly forbidden in the ‘sharia’ was that of permissibility.” Ultimately, Tareen said that by trying to compare the two groups within the context of a binary was harmful and fails to fully explain the traditions of each. “Rather than approaching debates on normative practice through the lens of a law-Sufism binary, or other binaries like good Muslim-bad Muslim, liberal-conservative and so forth, it might be more productive to look at the internal logics within the tradition,” he said.Tags: International studies, Islam, Kroc Institute, lecturelast_img read more

OCSE hosts Food Justice Week

Posted on

first_imgThe Office for Civic and Social Engagement (OCSE) is hosting its second food justice week, which will include events to engage the Saint Mary’s community in the pursuit of access to quality food for all people.Rebekah DeLine, director of the OCSE, said food justice week was an idea that came to her when she started working on Holy Cross Harvest.“When I started here at Saint Mary’s in 2016, I inherited Holy Cross Harvest,” she said. “Holy Cross Harvest is a tri-campus effort to raise money and nonperishable food items for the Food Bank of Northern Indiana — basically a food drive.”DeLine said she thought the idea of Holy Cross Harvest was great but that more should be done.“It’s easy to just give the dollar in your pocket or the can of soup under your bed in your dorm room and not ever think about how you should change your life or be advocating for those who don’t have choices,” she said.With this goal in mind, DeLine decided to expand the mission of Holy Cross Harvest.“Last year, we brought Holy Cross Harvest under the umbrella of a week focused on food justice, which is the idea that everybody should have the ability to have and purchase and consume good, healthy, quality food,” she said.DeLine said planning this year’s Food Justice Week was different than last year.“Because this is our second year, we’re lucky that it’s not as hard as it was the first year,” she said. “It took coordination with the food bank. It took coordination with the Center for the Homeless. It took coordination with the Ministry Assistants and other groups on campus — the sustainable farm and composting crew.”The efforts of Food Justice Week have to do with the campus community in addition to the surrounding community, DeLine said.“There’s a group on campus working to develop a sustainable farm, and that farm will be located just north and west of the soccer field,” DeLine said. “They had a cover crop, which they plowed under, and now they need to plant another cover crop this year. … Students were able to go out [Tuesday] and spread clover seed that will then grow this fall and spring as a cover crop to restore the nutrients to the soil.”In another component of Food Justice Week, Ministry Assistants in the residence halls went “reverse trick-or-treating” Thursday evening to collect items for Holy Cross Harvest, according to DeLine.“Students — rather than giving out candy — either [gave] the change out of their pockets or whatever food that’s nonperishable,” she said.Saturday, students will have the opportunity to “stuff a bus” with food items for the Center for the Homeless, DeLine said.She said incentives beyond the satisfaction of knowing the benefit of donating to support the food bank are available to participating students.“For every canned good, non-perishable item or dollar that they donate, students get a raffle ticket and put it in the raffle for one of four gift baskets,” DeLine said.Donations of money and non-perishable food items will be accepted through Monday at the OCSE office and in bins located in all of the dorms on campus, DeLine said.When it comes to measuring student participation, she said it’s hard to see exactly how many people are donating to these efforts.“Unless they actually fill out a raffle ticket, we don’t know how many people individually have participated, but we think that a lot of students are participating,” she said. “We think that a lot of staff and faculty participate as well, especially with the nonperishable food items and making financial donations.”The importance of events such as those of Food Justice Week can be seen in the writings of Pope Francis, DeLine said.“Pope Francis calls this the ‘throwaway culture,’” she said. “We are challenged to live our faith in ways that impact the common good, and that means not only what we do with our time and energy, but how we are as consumers and how we might make an impact in terms of who we support and what we do. As a student, you could make an impact by making a donation, but you could also make an impact by supporting sustainable growing practices or supporting the local economy rather than big box storesUnity Gardens and the Common Goods Coopertive are among the local organizations for which students can volunteer, DeLine said.“It’s choices, not only with how you spend your money, but how you spend your time and your efforts so that if you’re not participating in the throwaway culture, maybe you’re counteracting that,” she said.Tags: food justice week, Holy Cross Harvest, OCSE, Office of Civic and Social Engagementlast_img read more

Reed Questions State Nursing Home Probe, Blames Cuomo

Posted on

first_img“Placing the blame squarely on the staff who care for our grandparents — when the state knowingly created COVID hotspots by forcing homes to accept COVID-positive patients — is a slap in the face to those who lost a loved one. Even a cursory review of ADMA’s dire warning to New York State makes it clear what really contributed to New York’s horrific death toll,” Reed said.In a response to Monday’s press conference, Stephen Hanse, the President of the NYS Health Facilities Association and the NYS Center for Assisted Living, said: “At the onset of the COVID-19 virus, nursing homes and assisted living facilities were not the top priority. The principal focus of policymakers was on bolstering hospital resources and ramping up hospital bed capacity. This strategy included the Department of Health’s March 25th Advisory… As we learn more about the COVID-19 virus every day, policymakers now know that the men and women residing in nursing homes and assisted living facilities are the most at risk to infection from the COVID-19 virus…”Several Republicans continue to call for an independent investigation into the coronavirus in nursing homes. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: PixabayWASHINGTON — A new State Department of Health report Monday that examined the spread of COVID-19 in nursing homes, is just a way for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to dodge responsibility for nursing home deaths, according to Rep. Tom Reed.Reed, who has been calling for an independent investigation into the deaths of thousands of New York nursing home residents, blasted Cuomo.“This is a blatant attempt by Governor Cuomo to sidestep an ounce of accountability,” Reed  said. “As we’ve said all along, an independent investigation is needed to fully evaluate the impact of New York’s disastrous nursing home policies. Justice is not served when the individuals who were responsible for the state’s deadly edicts are reviewing their own conduct.”The report found that more than 37,000 nursing home workers were infected with the Coronavirus between March to early June. That accounts to about one in four nursing home staff. “The correlation is between what happened between community-wide infection and staff infection were the more prevalent reasons why there were fatalities in nursing homes. But it was not because of a directive on March 25,” said Northwell Health CEO Michael Dowling. That order required nursing homes to re-admit COVID positive patients unless they could not provide adequate care.“The March 25 guidance was not the driving factor in nursing home deaths,” NYS Health Commissioner Howard Zucker said.However, Reed places theWNYNewsNow File Image.blame squarely on Cuomo and his administration.last_img read more

Tony Nominee Rory O’Malley to Debut His Autobiographical Show Pub Crawl

Posted on

first_img View Comments Start your St. Paddy’s Day celebration a week early! Tony nominee Rory O’Malley (The Book of Mormon) will debut the world premiere of his autobiographical show Pub Crawl at Joe’s Pub (where else!?) on March 10. O’Malley is best known for his Tony nominated performance as Elder McKinley in The Book Of Mormon. Other stage credits include The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee and Happy Days The Musical. Screen credits include Dreamgirls, Nurse Jackie, Law and Order: SVU, 1600 Penn and the upcoming FX series, Braddock and Jackson. Pub Crawl is O’Malley’s coming-of-age story that tells the tale of being raised in an Irish pub on the west side of Cleveland by his single mom and all of the bar’s eclectic patrons. Using classic Irish pub songs from The Wolftones, U2, Van Morrison and more, the evening will feature music direction by Tony and Grammy winner, Stephen Oremus.center_img Rory O’Malley Star Fileslast_img read more

Tony Shalhoub Discusses Next Stage Role: Happy Days with Wife Brooke Adams

Posted on

first_img View Comments Tony Shalhoub is going from multiple costume (and character) changes and climbing up and down a revolving staircase in Act One to a far less physically demanding role. The Tony nominee stopped by Late Night on June 12 to share with Seth Meyers his upcoming stage venture: Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days opposite his wife, Brooke Adams. Shalhoub explained that in the play, “She’s buried in a mound up to her waist in the first act and up to her neck in the second act. I’m her husband and I’m just basically behind the mound lying down. Every once in a while I pop my head up and say a couple of words.” Beckett’s not exactly light material, but at least it’ll be easier on your legs, Mr. Shalhoub! What other projects does the actor have in the works? The voice of the rat Splinter in the upcoming Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film…Check out clips from the interview below! Star Files Act One Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2014 Related Shows Tony Shalhoublast_img read more