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Eagles Fire Defensive Line Coach Jim Washburn

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The Philadelphia Eagles have fired defensive line coach Jim Washburn after their 38-33 loss to the Dallas Cowboys Sunday night.According to the team, Washburn was “relieved of his duties” following the team’s eighth straight loss. The Eagles defensive line gave up 123 rushing yards compared to the Cowboys 183 rushing yards, which does not seem to be the reason behind his firing.“Jim is a fine football coach and we appreciate the efforts he gave to this team over the past two years,” coach Andy Reid. “However, I determined that it was in the team’s best interest that we move in a different direction in terms of trying to maximize the production of that position group. We look forward to having Tommy Brasher back on board to work with the defensive line.”Brasher was the Eagles defensive line coach in 1985 and from 1999 through 2005.One the determining factors that played into Washburn’s firing was that he had become a “cancer” around the team, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. His attitude took a turn for the worse when defensive end Jason Babin was released last week and picked up off of waivers by the Jacksonville Jaguars.Washburn was hired by Reid in Jan. 2011 to improve his pass rush defense. He brought his wide nine scheme to the Eagles, which aims to sack the quarterback at the expense of a run defense. The Eagles only managed to sack Tony Romo Sunday night one time for an 11-yard loss.The Eagles have 46 sacks on the season, but that was not enough for Reid nor the Eagles front office.Washburn built a reputation with the team for being outspoken about his thoughts. Last November, he was involved in an argument with offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg on the sideline during a game.He also expressed his frustrations to players about former defensive coordinator Juan Castillo, who was fired earlier in the season by Reid. Washburn has also complained about new defensive coordinator Todd Bowles, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.With a few more weeks left to go in the season, Reid has potentially seen his last days as the Eagles head coach and could possibly receive his pink slip soon. read more

Lori Saldana on her race for Board of Supervisors in District 4

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first_img June 4, 2018 Lori Saldana on her race for Board of Supervisors in District 4 Posted: June 4, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsThe June Primary is Tuesday and Democrat Lori Saldana is running for County Supervisor of District 4.She sat down with KUSI with the latest on her campaign. Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Decision 2018 FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

IT layoffs Mohandas Pai says graduation in engineering not enough to land

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first_imgFormer Infosys CFO and currently, Manipal Global Education Chairman TV Mohandas Pai (extreme right) at an event in Bengaluru on August 9, 2016.IANS”In the absence of a post-graduation qualification in engineering with an adequate specialisation, engineering graduates passing out of India’s colleges will find it tough to get a job in IT companies.” This is the straight and simple message from TV Mohandas Pai, former CFO of Infosys.”In future if you want to have a job, you must have M Tech, you must know coding and you must be an expert. You must have some level of expertise,” Pai, who currently heads Manipal Global Education, told news agency PTI.Read: Pessimism, fear grips IT employees, mid-level staff most vulnerableThe days of IT companies hiring fresh engineering graduates and then imparting training to them for four to six months to make them industry-ready are over, according to him.”They (IT companies) are not going to catch you raw and give you training for six months and pay for it. Why should they waste their time? They will test you on your coding skills and if you know very good coding, they will hire you,” he told the agency.The statement comes amid reports of massive layoffs by IT companies such as Tech Mahindra, Wipro, Capgemini and Cognizant, though most of them have played down such reports and said trimming of workers based on performance appraisal is an annual feature and no different this year.A top recruitment firm estimated the number of IT jobs that could be potentially under threat at six lakhs in the $150-billion industry that employs about 40 lakh people.”The digital tsunami will trigger jobs cuts in a big way in the IT industry that employs about 40 lakh people…about 24 lakh of them will have to be re-trained…but there are limitations here,” Kris Lakshmikanth, chairman and managing director of Head Hunters, told International Business Times India Edition last month. “Out of these 24 lakh employees, only about 50 percent, or approximately 12 lakh, can be re-trained and about 6 lakh can manage with existing skills. The rest, approximately 6 lakh, will lose their jobs over the next three years,” he added.He based his assessment on a report presented by McKinsey & Company at the Nasscom India Leadership Forum in February.He said senior managers, typically earning about Rs 25 lakh or more per annum, would be the worst hit. “Even if they are willing to take a salary cut, not many will be willing to hire them,” Lakshmikanth said.”My inferences are based on the McKinsey report and discussions with top executives of IT companies,” he added.The layoff wave, so to speak, will impact those employed in telecom and banking sectors also, he added.last_img read more

129000 Rohingyas trapped in squalid Myanmar camps

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first_imgRohingya Muslim children and elders gather at the Thet Kel Pyin camp in Rakhine state during the Eid al-Adha celebrations on 22 August 2018. Photo: AFPAbdurahim worries the lack of food, medicine and free movement is doing lasting damage to his four young children, who are among more than 129,000 Rohingya Muslims trapped in squalid camps inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state.In the grimy, rubbish-strewn alleyways of Thet Kel Pyin camp, near the state capital Sittwe, children gather around a slaughtered cow, a rare chance to eat meat on the second day of the Eid al-Adha festival.Most of the camp’s residents were forced from their homes in 2012, victims of ethnic and religious hatreds that have simmered for decades.Cut off from outside contact, their plight is rarely reported.Abdurahim, 46, fears that everyday life in the camp-split communities, restricted movement for the Rohingya and dependency on relief handouts-will shape his children forever.Aged between eight and 17, their formative years have been spent in Thet Kel Pyin, where the family arrived six years ago.“What kind of memory comes into their head? They think only one ethnicity lives like this,” Abdurahim-whose Myanmar name is Shwe Hla-told AFP.“Their vision is becoming like this.”His family’s struggle is overshadowed by the vast scale of the Rohingya refugee exodus into neighbouring Bangladesh that began one year ago.An army crackdown last August saw 700,000 of the persecuted minority flee over the border to one of the world’s largest refugee camps in violence the UN and US have likened to ethnic cleansing.Grim realityConditions in Thet Kel Pyin, witnessed during a brief visit late Wednesday on a government-steered press trip, suggested a dire need for food, education, jobs and medical services.But it is probably among the better camps in Rakhine, where government minders are willing to take media and visiting dignitaries.Visitors are denied access to other sites, like those in remote Pauktaw township where more than 22,000 eke out an existence in shelters built upon piles of garbage and excrement.Kaman Muslims live alongside the Rohingya in the camps, where many struggle with deteriorating health.“After six years here, our health is worsening,” said Thin Mya, a 64-year-old Kaman Muslim mother of four. “The rooms are so close to each other so… the health problem is getting bigger.”The first step to improving the grim reality of internally displaced Rohingya is “freedom of movement”, said Abdurahim, once a prosperous owner of a construction business in Sittwe.Myanmar says it is ready and willing to repatriate the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya who have fled to Bangladesh since last year.But it has complicated the process with bureaucracy while the refugees refuse to return without guarantees of safety, security and compensation.The UN has said conditions in Myanmar are not ripe for a safe and voluntary repatriation, especially given the desperate conditions in camps like Thet Kel Pyin, which were established after previous rounds of violence.To head off criticism, Myanmar says it will close nearly 20 of the camps in coming months.State media on Tuesday said one camp had been closed at Ni Din in the Kyauktaw area of Rakhine, following recommendations by the late United Nations secretary-general Kofi Annan released last year.But the UN’s Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs questioned whether these “so-called camp ‘closures’” were being done in the spirit of those recommendations, which emphasised an end to movement restrictions and granting the Rohingya a pathway to citizenship.“What matters most is not whether a camp is closed, but whether the displaced people in them can go home or be relocated in a process that profoundly transforms their lives,” OCHA spokesperson Pierre Peron told AFP.Myanmar’s government denies allegations of ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, yet labels them “Bengalis” non-native to the Buddhist-majority country.It insists that any Rohingya who return from Bangladesh should take up a National Verification Card, a form of ID that falls short of citizenship and denies them full rights.“Why do we need to hold this National Verification Card?” said Abdurahim. “We have lived here for generations.”last_img read more