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Fishing The North Coast: Pacific halibut flying over the rails

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first_imgFor the Times-StandardThe Pacific halibut bite all along the North Coast has been nothing short of spectacular this week. Since last Thursday when the ocean finally calmed, limits have been the rule. “It’s as good as I’ve seen it,” said Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “There’s been quite a few caught at the Cape in shallow water while rock fishing, and the Eel River Canyon area has been good too. They seem to be all up and down the line clear to Trinidad in 250 to 300 feet of water.” …last_img read more

Astronomers Lie about Star Formation

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first_imgA look at the evidence behind the latest claim of the universe’s earliest stars shows nothing of the sort. And that’s not the biggest whopper.“Astronomers claim first glimpse of primordial stars,” Nature News announces. Daniel Clery at Science Mag is even more brazen: “Astronomers spot first-generation stars, made from big bang.” The elusive “Population III” stars, made entirely of hydrogen, have at last been found! (one would think). These are supposedly members of the first generation of stars after the big bang, before any heavy elements had been made by supernovas. Science Daily tantalizes, “until now the search for physical proof of their existence had been inconclusive,” under its bold headline, “Best observational evidence of first generation stars in the universe: VLT discovers CR7, the brightest distant galaxy, and signs of Population III stars.”But it’s not true. Read the fine print. Nature says,Now astronomers think they may have spied a late-blooming cluster of such stars, in the brightest distant galaxy observed to date. The stars, seen as they were when the Universe was around 800 million years old, appear to be primordial in composition – but also to have formed more recently than some second-generation stars.These can’t be first-generation stars if they are younger than second-generation stars, especially when theory expects first-generation stars to burn out quickly. The statement only says they “appear to be primordial in composition.” But they are found in a galaxy with stars containing heavy elements. Those stars (according to current theory) could only form well after the “primordial” Population III stars had gone supernova, sending heavy elements into the galaxy’s gas and dust.Only below the bold headlines does the reader hear that the discovery creates other problems. Even then, some heavy interpretation is needed to keep the story going:But the galaxy is not where astronomers had imagined they would find the Universe’s earliest stars. CR7 also hosts second generation stars, made from recycled material. Sobral and colleagues suggest that the primordial stars may be late-developers, formed from a cloud of pristine and uncontaminated gas that was prevented from cooling and coalescing by the heat of strong radiation from earlier-blooming stars. “We think we’re seeing the last episode of Population III star formation,” he says.That primordial stars should turn up in such a large and already-evolved galaxy presents a challenge to the group’s interpretation, but is probably the least exotic of the possible explanations for CR7’s light signal, says Naoki Yoshida, an astrophysicist at the University of Tokyo. Further observations of the galaxy will be needed to rule out other possibilities, admit the authors.But Wait: There’s MoreThat was downright deceitful. But it’s not the first time astronomers have misrepresented their empirical evidence. A positivist story on PhysOrg from May 28, “Shining message about the end of the Dark Ages” promises enlightenment about the time before the first stars began to shine. This story, too, delivers darkness rather than light. After confident claims based on just three stars assumed to be primitive, the article admits difficulties:The current discoveries allow a fascinating new insight into the events surrounding the emergence of the first stars. Accordingly, these stars must not have arisen in isolation but in groups, Prof. Klessen underlines. The high-mass stars exploded after only a few million years, but far less violently than had been assumed. The Heidelberg scientist explains: “Only then could the lighter elements such as carbon or oxygen be projected far enough into the cosmos to be of use to the new stars, which have a lower mass but a longer life.” However, there is another puzzling question. The three newly discovered stars display no trace of lithium, although this chemical element is also contained in the original gas. For Dr. Marco Limongi from the Rome observatory, which is also part of the international research team, this is another mystery waiting to be elucidated.Frame grab:  Then there’s a PhysOrg article from June 8 that takes a snapshot and builds a movie out of it. Data from the ALMA Long Baseline Interferometry Campaign show a gravitationally lensed galaxy forming a classic “Einstein ring” shape. That’s the snapshot. From there, the reader is treated to a story about galaxies merging and creating huge numbers of new stars, which “will likely turn into new giant star-forming regions in the future.” The positivism morphs into a promissory note stamped What Scientists Will Learn Some Day. “It also shows how ALMA will enable astronomers to make more discoveries in the years to come, also uncovering yet more questions about the nature of distant galaxies.” They can’t lose; either they can claim it’s a discovery, or a question. If it doesn’t fit theory, keep sending money; it will be “another mystery waiting to be elucidated.”Dork side of the farce: We won’t dignify Space.com‘s putrid excuse for a teaser headline, “Band Of Galaxies Imitates Real Rock N’ Roll Lifestyle.” What? “Comparing this ‘cosmic quartet’ is akin to every day life of the Rock greats, where you find internal strife (black holes, tidal tails), struggles for stardom (star formation) and sexual encounters (galactic mergers).” Good grief; the data is about four galaxies (clumps of burning gas). Well, maybe there is something to the metaphor. They quote Carl Sagan, “We are made of starstuff.” Well, then, act like it!Dark Matter is another perennial no-show in astrophysics. PhysOrg offered the latest “fresh theories about dark matter” on May 15, and New Scientist recently got even more bizarre, proposing that dark matter may be composed of exotic “WIMPzillas from the dawn of time.” but more recently, New Scientist asked a very good question: “How long can we keep looking for dark matter?” The public has been led down this primrose path since the 1930s. Expensive detectors have failed to find it. The biggest particle detector in the world, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, hasn’t found it. “The search can’t go on forever,” the anonymous article says.It’s true that some hunches have borne fruit in the history of science, but there have been false leads, too, like the epicycles invented to prop up  Ptolemaic cosmology.  Is this the next “luminiferous aether” destined to be forgotten? Are astronomers “looking for something that isn’t there?”But pragmatically, the real issue is not the science, but the money. Most physicists would say it’s worth persevering with the search, given its potentially huge ramifications. But how long can they persuade their funders to keep paying for it? Consider the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, which, despite its potential impact, now receives no public money and relatively little private support. That’s easily explained: the scale of the task and the limits of our technology mean the chances of finding intelligent aliens seem slim. Given a few more years of null results, dark matter might come to seem a less worthwhile investment to cash-strapped funding bodies too.The unspoken option is to cut your losses, admit you were wrong, backtrack, and start on a whole new path.Galaxy evolution: Need more? PhysOrg promises that “‘Galaxy fingerprinting’ yields new clues about galaxy evolution,” but then ends by taking it all back. Keck Telescope observation show that distant galaxies are just like low-mass galaxies in the Milky Way’s neighborhood. So after all these years, working with the largest and most modern telescopes ever made, “We still don’t have an understanding of how parts of the Milky Way system formed, and our results now tell us what chemistry to go look for to answer this question.” Suggestion: report the facts and just leave it at that.Bonus: Had enough yet? Read Calla Cofield’s entry on Space.com, “Cosmic Confusion: Talk of Multiverses and Big Errors in Astrophysics.” Mario Livio recently confessed to the public some severe embarrassments in his field. “With three other prominent astrophysicists on the panel, Livio delved into one of the most confounding (and embarrassing) problems in modern astrophysics, which led to a discussion of whether or not our universe might be just one of an infinite number of multiverses— and whether a theory of the multiverse is good or bad for science.” He described how astronomers are off on their estimate for the vacuum energy of the universe by 120 orders of magnitude.“This is a large number even in astronomy,” Livio said. “Especially for a discrepancy.“One of the panelists, Josh Frieman, drove home how alarming this error is.“To make a math error that big you know you really have to work hard at it. It’s not easy,” said Frieman, who is a senior staff scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the current director of the Dark Energy Survey.These same people say that the matter and energy we observe only makes up 5% of what exists (the rest being inscrutable dark matter and dark energy), and that an infinite number of universes might exist (the multiverse), because this is the only way to avoid the appearance of design (the anthropic principle, the “A word” to this panel). One of the panelists admitted that astronomers “are in a very awkward situation” with their failures. “So I think we need to be open to all matter of speculations, given the sort of awkward situation we find ourselves in.”And the public trusts these guys to tell us about reality?Just send more money and maybe some day they will have their Theory of Everything (see Science Daily and The Conversation). They promise! Whom else would you trust but a scientist?There you have it; the queen of the sciences—the venerable science of astronomy—corrupted by dogmatic adherents to a godless worldview. They’re like snake oil salesmen who’ve been to the university and learned some big words and math operations. “Buy a bottle of our secular materialism, and we promise you big dividends—real soon!” Years go by; nothing. It happened with SETI; it’s happening with dark matter; and you’ve just seen astronomers and reporters willing to lie about “primordial stars.” Against that is the backdrop of being so wrong that “not even wrong” fails to capture the magnitude of their error. This is what David Klinghoffer calls science abuse (Evolution News & Views). They’re living in a fantasyland of unobservable universes and occult phenomena, where they can act like clowns and still get paid.It’s not just us saying this about the modern batch of secular cosmologists (10/06/04). We’ve been reporting others’ complaints about their pointy-headed wrongness for over a decade (6/18/03). Are you better off than you were 12 years ago? How much more time do they get to shape up?Scientists and reporters are just like everyone else, Klinghoffer reminds us (ENV). Some are “bright men and women with a gift that’s of value in their field, but otherwise subject to all the temptations that the rest of us are.” (After what these astronomers confessed, that is much too charitable.) They get away with it because undeserved respect has been heaped on them from the legacy of the good science days. Well, wake up. We’ve been had by a group of charlatans in science costumes. It’s not going to get better until more reporters like us hammer them with hard questions and (as wise old Phillip Johnson said) refuse to take bluffing and evasion for an answer. No snake oil salesman can endure a crowd that laughs out loud, and then gets righteously indignant about folly. Do your duty. 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No bedbugs for early humans

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first_imgArchaeologists sorting excavated material at Sibudu cave. (Image: Christine Sievers) Leaves in a plaster jacket. In the latest discovery new evidence of well preserved and fossilised plant bedding, dating back 77 000 years, has been found.(Image: Marion Bamford) Sibudu sediments showing evidence for the burning of plants. (Image: Lyn Wadley) MEDIA CONTACTS • Lindsay Marshall   Maropeng  +27 14 577 9021 RELATED ARTICLES • Maropeng sets green standard • Maropeng top evotourism destination • Angola a fossil hotspot • SA varsity leads the way in geosciencesWilma den HartighArchaeological excavations have delivered yet another significant find – this time at a rock shelter near Durban in KwaZulu-Natal province. The fossil discovery, made by a team of researchers, reveals fascinating insights into the development of behavioural practices of early modern humans in Southern Africa.Archaeologists have been excavating the middle Stone Age site at the Sibudu cave, a sandstone cliff in northern KwaZulu-Natal about 40km north of Durban, since 1998.In the latest discovery new evidence of well preserved and fossilised plant bedding, dating back 77 000 years, has been found.The fossilised leaves and other artefacts discovered at Sibudu, such as the oldest bone and arrow, the oldest needle, and fossilised grass stems and leaves, are now on show in a new fossil display at Maropeng at the Cradle of Humankind in Gauteng.Evidence of modern human behaviourThe discovery is an important addition to South Africa’s existing archaeological collection.What makes the plant bedding discovery so significant is that it reveals new information about the evolution of modern human behaviour, and shows how early Homo sapiens lived.Lindsay Marshall, curator at Maropeng, says that similar evidence has been discovered elsewhere in the world, but these discoveries date back to a more recent period than that of the Sibudu caves.The newest discovery is 50 000 years older than earlier reports of preserved bedding.The fossilised leaves reveal that early humans were using plants with insect repellent properties and placing them on the ground to sleep on – and possibly to live and work on too.This discovery could also be the earliest evidence of modern floor coverings, such as the carpets that we have in our homes today.According to the research team, led by Wits University archaeologist Prof Lyn Wadley, the findings suggest that during the Middle Stone Age, 77 000 years ago, our human ancestors had the cognitive ability to choose plants that contained insect repellent to sleep on.The fossilised grass stems and leaves were most likely sourced from the uThongathi River near Sibudu. Wits botanist Marion Bamford identified the leaves as belonging to Cryptocarya woodii, also known as the Cape laurel or river wild quince.The leaves of this tree contain chemicals that are insecticidal, and would be suitable for repelling mosquitoes.Wadley says that the selection of these leaves for the construction of bedding suggests that early inhabitants of Sibudu had an intimate knowledge of the plants surrounding the shelter, and were aware of their medicinal uses.Microscopic analysis of the bedding, conducted by Christopher Miller, a junior professor in geoarchaeology at the University of Tübingen in Germany, suggests that the inhabitants repeatedly refurbished the bedding during the course of occupation.In what could be an early form of house cleaning, the microscopic analysis found that the inhabitants of Sibudu regularly burned the bedding after use, possibly as a way to remove pests.According to Miller, this would have prepared the site for future occupation and indicates a novel use of fire for the maintenance of an occupation site.A rare fossil displayMarshall says that this discovery is one of a long list of important finds at Sibudu over the past decade. Over the years, this rock shelter has become a highly valuable site for archeological research.Other items discovered during the excavations include perforated seashells, believed to have been used as beads.“It is interesting to wonder what the beads were used for,” she says. “They were probably used either as gifts or for exchanges with other communities. Either way they had value,” she says.Wadley considers the discovery of the fossil plants and the perforated shells as major career highlights.“Sibudu is only the second site in South Africa where these shells have been found,” she says. “The other is Blombos Cave in the Western Cape.”Sharpened bone points which could have been used for hunting were also found at Sibudu, and indicate some of the earliest examples of modern human technology.The exhibition consists of lots of smaller items such as pieces of stone tools, tiny shells and fossilised leaves that can be viewed with magnifying glasses placed in each display cabinet.At a glance it might seem like a random collection of bits and pieces of stone, but what you are actually looking at are rare finds that are usually not displayed in exhibitions open to the public.“In the exhibition you look at small things, but their historical significance is huge,” says Marshall. “These discoveries are usually reserved for laboratories and journals.”• The exhibition, What makes us human: The significance of the Sibudu cave shelter, runs until the end of May at the Maropeng.last_img read more

2018 Feeding Farmers | Yocom Farms, Champaign Co.

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The first week of the 2018 Feeding Farmers program, sponsored by AgriGold, took the Ohio Ag Net crew just outside of Urbana in Champaign County to the Yocom farm where brothers Ross and Roger have been farming together for several years. The two were heavily involved in a building sprayers from 1974 onward, but recently retired from the business to solely farm. Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood visits with Roger about the operation and its history.Listen to Dale Minyo’s interview with Ross Yocom Audio Playerhttp://ocj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Dale-interview-at-Yocom-Farms-6-18-18.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Dale Minyo and Ross YocomJoel Penhorwood and Roger YocomThe group enjoying lunch at the Yocom’slast_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, October 3, 2018

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dry weather today. But, we are on the cusp of a significantly wetter weather pattern compared to what we have seen recently. The southern half of the state will be drier than the north, but we could see harvest effectively come to a longer term stop after today in parts of the state for at least 10 days. If you are in the field today, go as long as you can as hard as you can on harvest. Yesterday’s precipitation makes it difficult and more of a location by location kind of set up. Rains move into the state tomorrow. Rains tomorrow will be from .1”-.75” with coverage at 80% of the state, and then rains Friday will be from a few hundredths to a tenth or two with 30% coverage. There is no change in our outlook for these two days this morning. Unfortunately, we are putting rain in our forecast on Saturday, but holding its arrival off until late afternoon and evening. A slight positive will be that we are only looking for those rains over parts of the state, mostly from I-70 northward. South of I-70, there is no rain threat Saturday night. We will put rain totals at half an inch or less in the northern half of the state, with coverage at 70%. All action should be winding down by shortly after midnight. Dry for the balance of the weekend and the first part of next week, Sunday through Tuesday, statewide. We should see good dry down as temps stay normal to above normal, but we don’t think the drying can overcome the likely rain totals we see combined before we get there, at least over the northern half of the state. If we do dry down, it will take into at least Monday afternoon to get things right in the wettest areas. A very wet period kicks off Wednesday of next week. We can see rains 4 days straight from Wednesday through next Saturday. The heaviest rains come Thursday and Saturday but combined we can see half to 2.5” with coverage at 100% of the state. This will shut harvest down for a bit longer. Temps also drop behind that system, moving to normal and below normal levels. The map at right shows rain totals through the coming 10 days, ending with next Saturday. The rest of the extended period goes drier, as Canadian high pressure settles in over most of the corn belt. We should be dry from next Sunday on through the following Thursday, at least a 5-day dry stretch. But, it will be needed after all the rain the second half of next week, and with cooler temps, we likely take longer to dry down and evaporate that moisture too.So, as we said at the start…go as hard as you can today, if you can after yesterday’s moisture. Opportunities for fieldwork become tougher to find after today.last_img read more

Biofuel Helps Heat a Maine College

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first_imgFuel with a long track record, but obstacles remainBates College isn’t the only institutional user of Ensyn’s biofuel. Memorial Hospital in North Conway, New Hampshire, and a district heating plant in Youngstown, Ohio, are both customers, The Press Herald said, and Ensyn has landed a $70 million loan guarantee to build a new plant in Dooley County, Georgia, capable of producing 20 million gallons of fuel a year. The company is building a plant in Port-Cartier, Quebec, on the north coast of the St. Lawrence River, that should be open later this year.With new plants springing up in the East, institutional customers will have more options for heating fuels, but homeowners are unlikely to reap many benefits.“It works in smaller boilers,” Rasmussen said, “but not residential boilers. It would not be suitable for that.”In addition to practical roadblocks for residential use, there also are market forces at work, said Pavel Molchanov, an energy analyst with Raymond James, an investment broker.Ensyn has been a bright spot in the generally underwhelming cellulosic fuel industry, he wrote in a newsletter last summer. In a followup phone interview, Molchanov said that there’s more money to be made in transportation fuels than in heating, and that’s where Ensyn is likely to concentrate its efforts in the long run.“The simple reason is that fuels that are what we normally think of as renewable fuels are designed for transportation,” he said. “In theory it is possible to use some of them for heating. As a matter of chemistry it’s possible to use them for heating, but economically that would almost never be a good idea. The simple reality is the cost of energy in transportation fuel or gasoline or diesel is always higher than it is in heating.He continued, “If a company is making this product they will always want to sell into whatever market they make the most money in, and that is almost always going to be in transportation.”“Their goal is to get into transportation, though,” Molchanov said of Ensyn’s long-term objective. “They do not want to be selling exclusively for heating forever. Clearly the economics in transportation can be better.” U.S. Colleges Take ‘Climate-Neutral’ Pledge On College Campuses, Signs of Progress on Renewable EnergyLawmakers Try to Prop Up the Sagging Biomass IndustryBiomass Electricity: How Green Is It?Biofuels Turn Out To Be a Climate MistakeCorn Ethanol: The Rise and Fall of a Political ForceEnergy Return on Investment Will Europe Stop Trashing U.S. Forests in the Name of Bioenergy? RELATED ARTICLES Not a blended fuelUnlike the blend of gasoline and corn-derived ethanol that most of us use to fuel our vehicles, Ensyn’s RFO is not a mix of fossil fuels and something else. Lee Torrens, president of Ensyn’s fuels division, described it as a “pyrolytic oil.”“What we do with wood is basically crack it, like they crack petroleum, and then reform it into a liquid,” he said. Ensyn’s innovation was learning how to increase the liquid yield typical in a pyrolytic process from one-third to 70%.The fuel is about 20% water and it comes with half the BTU content of oil. When properly atomized it will burn just like boiler fuel, he said.“If you looked at an ultimate analysis of our liquid and you showed it to a chemical engineer and said, ‘What is this stuff?’ they’d say, ‘It’s wood. It looks like wood.’”The company estimates that the greenhouse gas emissions from burning the fuel are roughly 85% lower than they would be for oil.“All the emissions from wood are biogenic in the greenhouse gas world,” Torrens said. “I don’t have to count the carbon coming off the stack because the carbon emitted was taken up during the life of that tree. On a life-cycle basis, it’s neutral. We don’t have to prove anything in that respect. Those are given factors that are used. The only thing that varies is what kind of tree, how it was harvested, how far did it go.” Bates College was among the U.S. colleges and universities signing a pledge 10 years ago to become carbon neutral by 2020, in part by switching from fossil fuels to biomass to heat the 1 million square feet of space on its Lewiston, Maine, campus. Then something better came along — a Canadian biofuel made from waste wood that’s both cheaper and environmentally cleaner than the natural gas it had been burning, and without many of the logistical headaches that went with biomass.The cellulosic biofuel produced by Ensyn has a 30-year track record, and is poised to gain new customers in the eastern U.S. Ensyn currently operates one small production facility in Ontario but has plans to open at least two more plants in North America and another in Brazil.Although production is now barely a blip on the screen, roughly 3 million gallons a year, a biofuel made from wood holds intriguing possibilities for a heavily forested region of the country where fuel oil is still a dominant heat source. Nearly 360,000 Maine households, about 65% of the households in the state, burn oil or kerosene for heat. In Vermont and New Hampshire, oil’s share is about 45%, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, while the Northeast as a whole soaks up plenty of oil — just about 25% of all households use it for heat.center_img Conversion costs are highBates College spent about $1 million to convert one of its natural gas boilers so it could use Ensyn’s biofuel, said Bates College energy manager John Rasmussen. The college goes through about 700,000 gallons of fuel in a typical heating season, so Rasmussen also added a 20,000-gallon stainless-steel outdoor storage tank.The college needed new stainless-steel pumps and a new compressor; in fact, all plumbing for the fuel, up to an including the nozzle inside the combustion chamber must be made from stainless steel, because of the fuel’s high acid content. Also, to ensure proper ignition, the fuel must be heated to 160°F and delivered to the burner at 60 pounds per square inch of pressure.Like many other college campuses, Bates is putting a new emphasis on reducing its greenhouse gas emissions, and the switch to Ensyn’s biofuel looked more attractive than a conversion to wood chips or pellets — another option Rasmussen had been weighing and one that Colby College, also in Maine, embraced a few years ago.“This came along and we though, ‘Wow, this is fantastic,’” Rasmussen said by telephone. “We can get the same sustainability benefits. The fuel is more expensive than wood chips, but we would have had to spend $10 million to get a wood chip plant in here, plus the logistics weren’t good. We didn’t have a lot of land [to store] the fuel. We probably could have done it, but it would have been difficult, as opposed to spending a million bucks to convert an existing boiler.”The biofuel is trucked from the Ensyn plant in Renfrew, Ontario, an hour west of Ottawa and nine hours from the Bates campus. That trip will be shortened to about four hours when Ensyn completes a storage facility south of Quebec, but ultimately Rasmussen would like to see the company build a production facility somewhere in Maine.That idea is extremely appealing to a state with a strong forest products industry hard hit by recent downturns. Five paper mills have closed in the last three years as demand for traditional paper products fell, slashing thousands of jobs and creating a $1.3 billion hole in the state’s economy, Tux Turkel notes in a The Portland Press Herald report. At a time when many heating customers are looking for ways to reduce carbon emissions, a regionally produced heating fuel with better environmental credentials than oil could be just what the doctor ordered. That’s especially true if switching fuels did not require a wholesale replacement of heating equipment.The only rub? Ensyn’s biofuel, what it calls Renewable Fuel Oil, probably isn’t practical for residential use even as it lures new commercial and industrial accounts. Not a ‘black or white’ situation“I don’t know if it’s black and white,” Torrens said. Where Ensyn’s biofuel ultimately goes depends in part on the price of oil and a complex Environmental Protection Agency program called the Renewable Fuel Standard. RFS, which is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as it promotes the use of renewable fuels, includes the use of Renewable Identification Numbers, or RINS, that companies like Ensyn create and then sell when they make renewable fuels.RINS are sold to “obligated parties” like oil companies to help them meet program requirements. The RINS from the sale of RFO allow Ensyn to offer a discount to Bates, but changes in oil prices can affect the value of RINS and thus affect corporate decisions on where the fuel should go. Even so, Torrens said that Ensyn would not abandon its current heating customers.Another factor is the push on college campuses to lower carbon emissions.“A lot of these universities, Bates being one of them, have signed a climate change pledge,” Torrens said. “There were 250 of them once; now there are 900 of them. They signed initially in 2007. Now 10 years into it, people are saying, ‘What’s our progress?’“Stationary heating nominally is between 30% and 40% of the greenhouse gas impact from a university,” he continued. “Everybody is going to great lengths to get renewable energy by buying [renewable energy credits], putting up wind, putting up solar, blah blah blah. But the elephant in the living room for some of these guys is their stationary sources and what you can do about that. This may be the only way to de-carbonize a district energy system.”The other elephant in the living room is, of course, the fledgling Trump administration and what will happen to renewable energy and programs like RFS under the EPA’s new chief Scott Pruitt. That picture is still far from clear.last_img read more

BJP booth level leader shot dead in West Bengal

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first_imgA BJP booth level leader was shot dead and a party worker seriously injured when unidentified miscreants attacked them in West Bengal’s Paschim Burdwan district, police said Monday.The BJP booth level president Sandip Ghosh and party worker Jaidip Banerjee were returning home after attending a meeting when they were attacked by the miscreants at Malandighi Saraswatigunj area of the district on Sunday night, they said. Banerjee has been admitted to a private hospital in Durgapur. Bijay Ghosh, the father of the deceased, said his son had told him that he was going to attend a picnic. The BJP alleged that Ghosh was killed by TMC goons. Denying the allegations, a Trinammol Congress district leader said that BJP’s internal party rivalry was responsible for Ghosh’s death.last_img read more

Lady Warriors, Jet spikers dispute semis slot

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first_imgMyla Pablo and Kai Nepomuceno took care of the scoring in Pocari’s 25-23, 25-14, 25-19 rout of Adamson on Sunday, scoring 17 and 14 points, respectively.But the Lady Warriors’ firepower will be put to test by the scrappy Air Force crew, including Iari Yongco, Joy Cases and Mae Pantino. —MARC ANTHONY REYESSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress But that’s also what Air Force, which shares second spot with Pocari at 4-1, has in mind.The Jet Spikers are riding on a five-set triumph over the Power Smashers on Sunday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBaliPure also hopes to stay in contention when it takes on Adamson-Akari in the other match at 4 p.m.The Water Defenders suffered a stinging five-set defeat at the hands of streaking Perlas-BanKo in a match that saw last conference’s runners-up take the first two sets. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Phoenix, NLEX shoot for No. 3 LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ An outright semifinal stint is at stake when defending champion Pocari Sweat and Air Force clash Wednesday in the Premier Volleyball League Open Conference at 6:30 p.m. Filoil Flying V Centre.Pocari is coming off a win against Adamson-Akari over the weekend and is bent on clinching a spot in the semifinals along with early qualifier and unbeaten league-leader Creamline.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet View comments El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ MOST READ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plantlast_img read more