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#JaVotes2016: Vaz confident of win as delays hit West Portland voting

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first_imgThe electorate in West Portland are turning out to cast their ballots on election day 2016. Most polling stations across that constituency, where the incumbent Daryl Vaz is being challenged by Peoples National Party (PNP) candidate Vernon Hemmings, opened on time and voting is proceeding, but not without delays. At Orange Bay primary, the voting process was proceeding without much difficulty, although some of the electors including 70 year old Sherwood Forrester stated that it took them approximately 10 minutes to complete the voting process. A similar situation was evident at Buff Bay primary and Windsor primary, where the process was delayed by lack of national identification cards. Vaz, who is seeking a third term, is expressing confidence that he will win by a wide margin. According to Vaz, indications are that there will be a national swing in favour of the JLP. But while Vaz is confident of victory, Hemmings is also expressing confidence of a victory- pointing out that the ground work done by his team should ensure a PNP victory. `last_img

Local Election 2019: Daughter’s amazing journey to help dad make it count!

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first_imgA devoted daughter made an amazing journey today to ensure that her dad would not lose out once again after he previously lost his council seat by just ONE vote!Donegal county councillor Jimmy Kavanagh was heartbroken in 2004 when he lost his seat by just one vote in the local elections.His daughter Lea now lives in San Francisco but follows her dad’s political career closely. For the past few weeks while Jimmy’s family and friends were canvassing door to door in Letterkenny for the Fine Gael councillor, Lea felt a little helpless.It didn’t help that the same family and friends kept reminding her how her ONE vote could be the difference to her dad continuing his political career.Leah Kavanagh who made a surprise trip home from America to cast her vote pictured with her father outgoing Cllr Jimmy Kavanagh, her mother Rosin and her sister Michelle Connely and nephew Jack pictured as they all cast their vote in Letterkenny. Yesterday. Photo Brian McDaid.So nothing would do Lea than to make the 7,985km journey to make sure she was able to vote for her beloved dad.She flew in today just in time to put an ‘x’ in the box beside her dad’s name. A delighted Jimmy, who knew nothing of the secret trip, was speechless when Lea turned up at a polling station at Trinity Hal in Letterkenny in Letterkenny.Jimmy told Donegal Daily “I was just speechless. I didn’t now what to say. It’s wonderful to have all the family together now for what hopefully be a great occasion.”Lea, who works in investments in the US, has been in the US for five years but was determined to make the 17-hour journey to vote for her dad.Leah Kavanagh who made a surprise trip home from America to cast her vote pictured with her father outgoing Cllr Jimmy Kavanagh, her mother Rosin and her sister Michelle Connely pictured as they all cast their vote in Letterkenny. Yesterday. Photo Brian McDaid.“I flew into Dublin and then took another flight from Dublin to Carrickfin Airport. It was amazing to fly into Donegal.“I felt so helpless not being able to canvass for him over the past six weeks so hopefully my vote will help him a little. I really do hope he does it again,” she said. All will be revealed on Sunday whether Lea’s marvellous journey was worth it – if her dad gets across the line.Outgoing Fine Gael Cllr. Jimmy Kavanagh’s expression says it all as he spots his daughter Leah who made a surprise trip home from America to cast her vote in Letterkenny yesterday. Photo Brian McDaid.Local Election 2019: Daughter’s amazing journey to help dad make it count! was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Cllr Jimmy Kavanaghcounty councillor. Leah Kavanaghletterkennysan franciscolast_img read more

Astronomers Lie about Star Formation

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first_imgA look at the evidence behind the latest claim of the universe’s earliest stars shows nothing of the sort. And that’s not the biggest whopper.“Astronomers claim first glimpse of primordial stars,” Nature News announces. Daniel Clery at Science Mag is even more brazen: “Astronomers spot first-generation stars, made from big bang.” The elusive “Population III” stars, made entirely of hydrogen, have at last been found! (one would think). These are supposedly members of the first generation of stars after the big bang, before any heavy elements had been made by supernovas. Science Daily tantalizes, “until now the search for physical proof of their existence had been inconclusive,” under its bold headline, “Best observational evidence of first generation stars in the universe: VLT discovers CR7, the brightest distant galaxy, and signs of Population III stars.”But it’s not true. Read the fine print. Nature says,Now astronomers think they may have spied a late-blooming cluster of such stars, in the brightest distant galaxy observed to date. The stars, seen as they were when the Universe was around 800 million years old, appear to be primordial in composition – but also to have formed more recently than some second-generation stars.These can’t be first-generation stars if they are younger than second-generation stars, especially when theory expects first-generation stars to burn out quickly. The statement only says they “appear to be primordial in composition.” But they are found in a galaxy with stars containing heavy elements. Those stars (according to current theory) could only form well after the “primordial” Population III stars had gone supernova, sending heavy elements into the galaxy’s gas and dust.Only below the bold headlines does the reader hear that the discovery creates other problems. Even then, some heavy interpretation is needed to keep the story going:But the galaxy is not where astronomers had imagined they would find the Universe’s earliest stars. CR7 also hosts second generation stars, made from recycled material. Sobral and colleagues suggest that the primordial stars may be late-developers, formed from a cloud of pristine and uncontaminated gas that was prevented from cooling and coalescing by the heat of strong radiation from earlier-blooming stars. “We think we’re seeing the last episode of Population III star formation,” he says.That primordial stars should turn up in such a large and already-evolved galaxy presents a challenge to the group’s interpretation, but is probably the least exotic of the possible explanations for CR7’s light signal, says Naoki Yoshida, an astrophysicist at the University of Tokyo. Further observations of the galaxy will be needed to rule out other possibilities, admit the authors.But Wait: There’s MoreThat was downright deceitful. But it’s not the first time astronomers have misrepresented their empirical evidence. A positivist story on PhysOrg from May 28, “Shining message about the end of the Dark Ages” promises enlightenment about the time before the first stars began to shine. This story, too, delivers darkness rather than light. After confident claims based on just three stars assumed to be primitive, the article admits difficulties:The current discoveries allow a fascinating new insight into the events surrounding the emergence of the first stars. Accordingly, these stars must not have arisen in isolation but in groups, Prof. Klessen underlines. The high-mass stars exploded after only a few million years, but far less violently than had been assumed. The Heidelberg scientist explains: “Only then could the lighter elements such as carbon or oxygen be projected far enough into the cosmos to be of use to the new stars, which have a lower mass but a longer life.” However, there is another puzzling question. The three newly discovered stars display no trace of lithium, although this chemical element is also contained in the original gas. For Dr. Marco Limongi from the Rome observatory, which is also part of the international research team, this is another mystery waiting to be elucidated.Frame grab:  Then there’s a PhysOrg article from June 8 that takes a snapshot and builds a movie out of it. Data from the ALMA Long Baseline Interferometry Campaign show a gravitationally lensed galaxy forming a classic “Einstein ring” shape. That’s the snapshot. From there, the reader is treated to a story about galaxies merging and creating huge numbers of new stars, which “will likely turn into new giant star-forming regions in the future.” The positivism morphs into a promissory note stamped What Scientists Will Learn Some Day. “It also shows how ALMA will enable astronomers to make more discoveries in the years to come, also uncovering yet more questions about the nature of distant galaxies.” They can’t lose; either they can claim it’s a discovery, or a question. If it doesn’t fit theory, keep sending money; it will be “another mystery waiting to be elucidated.”Dork side of the farce: We won’t dignify Space.com‘s putrid excuse for a teaser headline, “Band Of Galaxies Imitates Real Rock N’ Roll Lifestyle.” What? “Comparing this ‘cosmic quartet’ is akin to every day life of the Rock greats, where you find internal strife (black holes, tidal tails), struggles for stardom (star formation) and sexual encounters (galactic mergers).” Good grief; the data is about four galaxies (clumps of burning gas). Well, maybe there is something to the metaphor. They quote Carl Sagan, “We are made of starstuff.” Well, then, act like it!Dark Matter is another perennial no-show in astrophysics. PhysOrg offered the latest “fresh theories about dark matter” on May 15, and New Scientist recently got even more bizarre, proposing that dark matter may be composed of exotic “WIMPzillas from the dawn of time.” but more recently, New Scientist asked a very good question: “How long can we keep looking for dark matter?” The public has been led down this primrose path since the 1930s. Expensive detectors have failed to find it. The biggest particle detector in the world, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, hasn’t found it. “The search can’t go on forever,” the anonymous article says.It’s true that some hunches have borne fruit in the history of science, but there have been false leads, too, like the epicycles invented to prop up  Ptolemaic cosmology.  Is this the next “luminiferous aether” destined to be forgotten? Are astronomers “looking for something that isn’t there?”But pragmatically, the real issue is not the science, but the money. Most physicists would say it’s worth persevering with the search, given its potentially huge ramifications. But how long can they persuade their funders to keep paying for it? Consider the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, which, despite its potential impact, now receives no public money and relatively little private support. That’s easily explained: the scale of the task and the limits of our technology mean the chances of finding intelligent aliens seem slim. Given a few more years of null results, dark matter might come to seem a less worthwhile investment to cash-strapped funding bodies too.The unspoken option is to cut your losses, admit you were wrong, backtrack, and start on a whole new path.Galaxy evolution: Need more? PhysOrg promises that “‘Galaxy fingerprinting’ yields new clues about galaxy evolution,” but then ends by taking it all back. Keck Telescope observation show that distant galaxies are just like low-mass galaxies in the Milky Way’s neighborhood. So after all these years, working with the largest and most modern telescopes ever made, “We still don’t have an understanding of how parts of the Milky Way system formed, and our results now tell us what chemistry to go look for to answer this question.” Suggestion: report the facts and just leave it at that.Bonus: Had enough yet? Read Calla Cofield’s entry on Space.com, “Cosmic Confusion: Talk of Multiverses and Big Errors in Astrophysics.” Mario Livio recently confessed to the public some severe embarrassments in his field. “With three other prominent astrophysicists on the panel, Livio delved into one of the most confounding (and embarrassing) problems in modern astrophysics, which led to a discussion of whether or not our universe might be just one of an infinite number of multiverses— and whether a theory of the multiverse is good or bad for science.” He described how astronomers are off on their estimate for the vacuum energy of the universe by 120 orders of magnitude.“This is a large number even in astronomy,” Livio said. “Especially for a discrepancy.“One of the panelists, Josh Frieman, drove home how alarming this error is.“To make a math error that big you know you really have to work hard at it. It’s not easy,” said Frieman, who is a senior staff scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the current director of the Dark Energy Survey.These same people say that the matter and energy we observe only makes up 5% of what exists (the rest being inscrutable dark matter and dark energy), and that an infinite number of universes might exist (the multiverse), because this is the only way to avoid the appearance of design (the anthropic principle, the “A word” to this panel). One of the panelists admitted that astronomers “are in a very awkward situation” with their failures. “So I think we need to be open to all matter of speculations, given the sort of awkward situation we find ourselves in.”And the public trusts these guys to tell us about reality?Just send more money and maybe some day they will have their Theory of Everything (see Science Daily and The Conversation). They promise! Whom else would you trust but a scientist?There you have it; the queen of the sciences—the venerable science of astronomy—corrupted by dogmatic adherents to a godless worldview. They’re like snake oil salesmen who’ve been to the university and learned some big words and math operations. “Buy a bottle of our secular materialism, and we promise you big dividends—real soon!” Years go by; nothing. It happened with SETI; it’s happening with dark matter; and you’ve just seen astronomers and reporters willing to lie about “primordial stars.” Against that is the backdrop of being so wrong that “not even wrong” fails to capture the magnitude of their error. This is what David Klinghoffer calls science abuse (Evolution News & Views). They’re living in a fantasyland of unobservable universes and occult phenomena, where they can act like clowns and still get paid.It’s not just us saying this about the modern batch of secular cosmologists (10/06/04). We’ve been reporting others’ complaints about their pointy-headed wrongness for over a decade (6/18/03). Are you better off than you were 12 years ago? How much more time do they get to shape up?Scientists and reporters are just like everyone else, Klinghoffer reminds us (ENV). Some are “bright men and women with a gift that’s of value in their field, but otherwise subject to all the temptations that the rest of us are.” (After what these astronomers confessed, that is much too charitable.) They get away with it because undeserved respect has been heaped on them from the legacy of the good science days. Well, wake up. We’ve been had by a group of charlatans in science costumes. It’s not going to get better until more reporters like us hammer them with hard questions and (as wise old Phillip Johnson said) refuse to take bluffing and evasion for an answer. No snake oil salesman can endure a crowd that laughs out loud, and then gets righteously indignant about folly. Do your duty. 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A Box of Red Herrings — Geocache of the Week

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first_imgDifficulty:4Terrain:1 TraditionalGC6NQC2by burgo78 “A Box of Red Herrings” (GC6NQC2) delivers exactly what it promises. The cache itself is hidden with permission inside the Aitkenvale Library in Queensland, Australia. It’s not  difficult to spot, but the logbook inside is as well protected as J.K. Rowling’s sorcerer’s stone.The cache sits in an inconspicuous corner of the library.At ground zero you’ll find a three-foot tall cupboard with each of its drawers padlocked. Tackle the bottom drawer first, using instructions on the cache page and letters from a nearby library sign as your guide.“A Box of Red Herrings” is easy to find but tricky to open.Open that drawer to find over a hundred mostly unmarked keys. You might start to feel like Harry Potter himself as you search through a throng of dud keys to locate one that will unlock the middle drawer.It’ll take a while to sift through the contents of the bottom drawer to find the right tool to open the middle one.The middle drawer contains several items. Some may be useful in opening the top drawer and gaining access to the log inside. Most are red herrings. The challenge lies in discerning which are which.The contents of the middle drawer will take some time to sift through.The middle drawer contains the following:A magnifying glass and a small clue; on the clue some letters and numbers are in bold or capitalizedTwo tent pegs which will fit into holes in the drawersA telescoping magnetA mirror and a backwards noteToothpicks and a block of wood – when the toothpicks are pushed into the holes in the wood they spell something in Roman numeralsSeveral plastic eggs, some with letters on themA UV torchIs it a literal or a figurative red herring?Is one of the objects — or are several of them in combination — a clue? Or is there some other trick to getting the top drawer open? We won’t reveal any more than that here, but cachers who make it out to this cache won’t find it an easy one to finish…unless, says the cache owner, they ask for a hint from the local older gentleman who often sits in a chair near the cache.The UV torch highlights a clue…or another red herring.Impressively, the cache owner, burgo78, has only been geocaching since March of 2016, proving that it doesn’t take years of geocaching practice to design a cool hide. He’s been thoroughly enjoying his first year of caching. “I now have 800+ finds and have 60 hides in Townsville (plus one in the USA, and one in England); some are simple containers but most are either a little harder to get to (boat or remote) or are a little more creative as these are the types of hides I enjoy finding myself.”The bottom and middle drawer successfully unlocked. One to go!A mysterious jar of sticks can be arranged into a mysterious upright row of sticks.Although he’s sure his caches will provide a fun challenge for many, burgo78’s motives may lie elsewhere. “I also hope that this cache my inspire new hides in Townsville as I’ve found almost all of the 400 currently in place and the next substantial city is over four hours’ drive away.” The struggle is real.Trying to discern what the magnifying glass is for.Until now, only a few folks have found “A Box of Red Herrings”, but the comments have been unanimously positive. Burgo78 hopes that more cachers will rise to the challenge and won’t be too distracted by the red herrings they’ll encounter along the way.We can see a lot of work and thought has gone in to this really great cache. We tried many options, slowly and methodically working towards success. My comment when I signed the log, “WOW”. Thank you, a favorite for us.The logbook and a trove of other objects — mysterious and otherwise — finally reveal themselves.Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Location:Townsville, AustraliaS 19° 17.724 E 146° 46.327 SharePrint RelatedDer Telefonjoker (🌜Night-Cache, Multi🌛) — Geocache of the WeekAugust 14, 2019In “Geocache of the Week”FTF 10 Years in the MakingJuly 22, 2012In “Community”S.P.D. #1 – Welcome! — Geocache of the WeekApril 26, 2017In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more

The 50 Most-Blogged Albums of 2009, Streaming Free: HypeMachine Zeitgeist Out Now

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first_img5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts marshall kirkpatrick 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…center_img Hype Machine, the smart, long-running MP3 blog aggregator, has posted its annual collection of the most-blogged-about albums, songs and musical artists of the year. Once again, the project is a pleasure to consume and will unfold throughout the month of January. Top albums 50 through 41, Mumford and Sons through Monsters of Folk, are available now in full for streaming.The album collection combines weighted rankings – based on submitted top 10 lists from 550 MP3 blogs – with a widget from Grooveshark to listen to the album, and a Creative Commons photo of each band. It’s quite nice. The newest addition to the project is unusually low-tech; it’s artist renditions of the top 50 musical artists of the year.Last year’s Zeitgeist combined different technology to present the top albums and is still available as a list. It’s not as easy to listen to, though, perhaps because it was powered by Imeem, which MySpace bought and made a tragic mess of last month.This year’s Hype Machine Zeitgeist is another example of the awesome potential of free online music combined with smart technology and excellent design. Check it out and be inspired. Is this era the end of the music industry? It sure doesn’t need to be. 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Tags:#music#news#web last_img read more

Nokia 130 and Nokia 130 dual rolled out globally

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first_imgMicrosoft acquired Nokia has rolled out two feature phones- Nokia 130 and Nokia 130 Dual globally at EUR 19 (INR 1,500 approx.). The devices which were launched the previous month will first be available in China, Pakistan and Nigeria, followed by other markets, which have not been specified so far.The Nokia 130 and Nokia 130 Dual SIM will be available in Black, Red, and White colour options. Though the devices have been listed on the company’s website but they do not mention the pricing and availability details. The announcement was made public on the company’s blog which said “The Nokia 130 is a perfect device for people young and old alike who are looking for their first mobile phone, or for those looking for a rock-solid backup phone to use alongside their smartphone.”Both the handsets have similar specifications and run on Nokia OS Serries 30+ out-of-the-box. Nokia 130 and 130 Dual come with 1020mAh battery that offers an impressive standby talk time of 36 days and 26 days respectively.The feature phones sport a 1.8 inch QQVGA (128×168 pixels) 16-bit LCD colour display that offers 114ppi. Other than this, it also offers a microSD memory card slot, which supports storage expansion to up to 32 GB and is also equipped with a flash light. Talking about the connectivity options the device offers 2G and bluetooth connectivity options along with a Micro-USB slot for charging.last_img read more