杭州桑拿论坛

Fulham v Reading line-ups: defensive changes for Whites, Royals man returns

Posted on

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesFulham make two changes, both in defence, as they welcome Reading to Craven Cottage.With Denis Odoi serving a suspension for accumulated yellow cards, Ryan Fredericks returns at right-back, while Tim Ream comes in for Michael Madl, who drops to the bench.Otherwise, the rest of the team is the same as the one which started the defeat at Brighton last weekend.Scott Parker returns from a ban but is only among the substitutes.Reading make one change, with Joey van den Berg replacing the unavailable Liam Moore.Tyler Blackett will drop into centre-back and Jordan Obita to left-back with van den Berg slotting into midfield.Fulham: Button; Fredericks, Ream, Kalas, Malone; McDonald, Johansen; Aluko, Cairney, Ayite; Martin.Subs: Bettinelli, Madl, Sessegnon, Parker, Kebano, Piazon, Smith.Reading: Al-Habsi; Gunter, McShane, Blackett, Obita; Van den Berg, Evans, Williams; Beerens, Samuel, McCleary.Subs: S. Moore, Cooper, Mendes, Harriott, Meite, Watson, Kelly. See also:Brilliant Fulham crush 10-man Reading  Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Should Warriors be concerned about Stephen Curry’s ankle again?

Posted on

first_imgStephen Curry’s awkward slip in New Orleans reminded us all that the fears of the Golden State Warriors and their fans still run ankle deep.In a hauntingly familiar sight, Curry’s right ankle gave way and he fell to the floor with 3:21 left in the first quarter Tuesday night. Although Curry was able to get up and play for a few more seconds, he then took himself out of the game and walked to the locker room.Who didn’t think, ‘Here we go again’?By our count, it was the 15th time Curry has …last_img read more

Tourism to cash in on 2010 boom

Posted on

first_imgSouth African traditions are also atourism drawcard. The OR Tambo International Airportwas revamped ahead of the World Cup.(Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Trevor BloemChief Director: CommunicationsDepartment of Tourism+27 12 310 3631 or +27 82 771 6729RELATED ARTICLES• World Cup driving SA tourism• SA airports 90% World Cup ready• Kruger Park booked out for 2010• Tourism in South AfricaBongani NkosiThe recent 2010 Fifa World Cup has eradicated many myths about South Africa and boosted growth prospects for the country’s tourism industry, the government said on 7 September 2010.The tournament created a bright image of the country, Minister of Tourism Marthinus van Schalkwyk said in a statement. “The positive brand value that has been unlocked is immeasurable. The event helped us to turn the corner in terms of foreign perceptions about tourism safety.”The Department of Tourism met with industry role-players in Kempton Park, near Johannesburg, on 6 September to review the tournament’s impact on the sector.Delegates at the meeting included representatives from Federated Hospitality Association, South African Tourism Services Association of South Africa and the Board of Airline Representatives of South Africa, among others. They discussed lessons learnt from the spectacle and future plans for the industry.The meeting is part of government’s ongoing process of evaluating the benefits associated with hosting the football World Cup.In 2010, and especially during the tournament, South Africa managed to position itself as a high-quality tourism destination, according to the minister.“The World Cup opened up a new window of opportunity for the tourism industry,” said Van Schalkwyk. “It is up to all of us to make use of this opportunity.”It speeded up the construction and renovation of vital infrastructure, such as airports and new accommodation facilities, Van Schalkwyk added.The King Shaka International Airport in KwaZulu-Natal was built at a cost of R6.7-billion (US$922-million), while the country’s two other international airports, OR Tambo and Cape Town, received multibillion-rand upgrades.Domestic airports, including those in Bloemfontein, East London, Upington and Kimberley, also underwent massive revamps worth millions of rands.“These are all important investments in building the future capacity of the tourism sector,” said Van Schalkwyk.Tourism on top of its gameThe country’s tourism industry was on top of its game during the World Cup, the minister said.In addition to creating a safe environment for tourists and completing airport and road revamps on time, the sector excelled in service delivery in the formal accommodation sector, management of increased airlift volumes, the security of air space and the implementation of new systems to facilitate passenger movement, Van Schalkwyk said.“Overall, the collective efforts in the tourism sector were key in delivering an exceptional World Cup,” he added. “As a country, a people, a government and private sector we built a shared vision and delivered on it.”However, the industry could have done so much more in other areas, the minister said. These include ensuring greater benefits for small, medium and micro enterprises; better managing the expectations of the informal accommodation sector; “getting accommodation prices right in the face of the global economic downturn”; and listing up-front availability of accommodation on a database.National convention and events bureau The tourism department is planning to set up a national convention and events bureau to make the most of the World Cup legacy.Cashing in on the infrastructure investments is one of the most important tasks ahead, the minister said, adding that “our proposals in this regard have been received very well by the industry”.The bureau will be part of the five-year National Tourism Sector Strategy (NTSS) which the department introduced in May 2010. It will be positioned to market events and promote tourism businesses.In light of South Africa attracting more than 1-million tourists during the month-long World Cup, the NTSS is now aiming to increase the number of foreign arrivals in the future.Some 9.9-million foreign visitors came to the country in 2009, but through the strategy volumes are hoped to reach 13.5-million by 2015.last_img read more

Interview: Tracy Andreen on the Romance of Writing for Hallmark

Posted on

first_imgLove may hurt, but it also sells. The Hallmark Channel produces 90+ holiday and romance films per year, so we sat down with the woman behind the words.When you think of chestnuts on an open fire, gingerbread houses, and sugar cookies, you think of the holidays. Screenwriter, Tracy Andreen is grateful for the head start that imagery gives her when writing a holiday film. But, at her prolific pace, her work takes so much more skill, craft, and imagination. We sat down for a cup of holiday cheer to unwrap what it takes to make a successful Hallmark Channel holiday screenplay.Courtesy of Tracy Andreen.PremiumBeat: Tracy, in 2018, you’ve written six produced films for Hallmark, and it’s only November. Clearly you are the most romantic, holiday-obsessed person in the world — or you have a great understanding of Hallmark’s brand of entertainment. What is your secret sauce to success?Tracy Andreen: Being professional. When given a deadline, I do everything in my power to deliver on that deadline, especially as the time to start production nears. In the realm of TV movies, the windows for delivery can be quite narrow, and there is a whole cadre of other professionals (actors, directors, production supervisors, casting, etc.) who are often times dependent on the writer’s ability to deliver a teleplay in a timely fashion so they can then do their jobs.As much fun as this can be — and being allowed to be creative for a living is a dream! — it’s also crucial to remember that this is a job and the writer is part of a team working together to create the best product possible. Movies are awesome. Chances are quite good that your readers love them, love storytelling, love the chance to get lost in flickering lights for an hour or two (or twenty, depending on how much binge-watching a person can fit into their day). But making them is unquestionably work, and writers have to put in the hours to be able to execute.My “secret sauce” is knowing that, and making sure to do my part. Some writers see themselves as artists, and good on them. If they can get a movie made exactly as they envisioned all on their own, congratulations! Otherwise, writers have to learn the fine art of knowing when to compromise and when to speak up for what aspect of the story you believe should remain if/when it’s challenged. I know that sounds dry and crazy un-inspiring, but it’s the truth.Tracy with co-writer Kevin Taft (courtesy of Tracy Andreen).Now, once that’s established, the other part of what I think has helped contribute to my recent success is I just freakin’ love movies! I grew up in a family that loves movies. My dad was a huge movie buff (anyone want to talk John Ford films? Billy Wilder? Howard Hawks? MGM Musicals? — he introduced me to all those and more) so I grew up with what turned out to be a phenomenal unofficial education in cinema. Classics, modern, and all points in-between. Watching all those movies taught me the art of recognizing stories that work — as well as stories that don’t — and learning the rhythm of good dialogue (thank you I.A.L. Diamond, Comden & Green, Nora Ephron, Neil Simon, just to name a few), even if I didn’t realize it at the time. I was just enjoying cinematic stories.And that’s important. Love of what you do, whatever you do, is the element that has the potential to take you to the next level of your chosen profession because, as my dad once told me, “As long as you love what you do for a living, it doesn’t feel as much like work.” Which might seem like a giant contradiction to the first part of what I just espoused, but it’s not. I love what I do and am beyond grateful for the opportunity to be able to do it, but at the end of the day it’s still work . . . awesome work I love, so I’m thrilled to do so and, hopefully, that shines through.Courtesy of Tracy Andreen.PB:  Writing is not only about inspiration; it is also a craft that takes skill, structure, and discipline. Obviously — since you are so prolific — you must have a system in place that keeps you organized, on message, and on deadline. What is your process? Do you start with an outline? Beat Sheet? Character bio?TA: Oh, God, “process” . . . Welp, believe it or not in this glorious age of digital, my first step when beginning a new project is to get a notebook (preferably TOPS 8.5 x 11, spiral-bound, college-ruled — and, yes, that’s how picky I can get) and pen (Pentel Energel Alloy gel pen, .5 tip) and make a cup of tea (Earl Grey or English Breakfast with the occasional chai if I’m feeling adventurous) and start writing there.Aside from the fact that studies show our brains retain more information when read in book or magazine format, and that different parts of our brains “light up” when we write longhand (as opposed to typing up notes or ideas onto our laptops), a big reason I go this route is I feel less obligated to anything I put down on paper than when I see it oscillating back at me on my monitor. I can scratch through an idea and keep going, and if later I think, “Hey, wait, that other idea was pretty good after all,” I can flip back a few pages, locate it, and use it going forward — instead of being annoyed because I sent it into oblivion via the delete button.Right now, I have boxes and drawers filled with notebooks that go back decades, for projects I’m just spitballing to those that have already aired. If I’ve been given a rewriting assignment, I will read the last draft of the project then the notes from the network/producers and come up with my ideas for solutions then pitch those ideas to said network execs/producers. And what my experience has shown [to be] the best route to those solutions is going through the main characters to find out what’s working and what isn’t. If possible. Sometimes I’m brought in so late in the game that a plot point I would prefer to bypass has to remain because there simply isn’t time to reconfigure everything for a different solution (I’m looking at you “overheard-conversation-leads-to-misunderstanding-and-heartbreak!”).When it comes to an original story, I usually have a very broad idea first then ponder what kind of story that idea would work best as in order to execute the idea, and almost always by that time the characters have already begun to reveal themselves. Look, writing is weird. I’ve often likened it to managed schizophrenia. Voices chattering in one’s brain, telling you which direction they would like the story to go, as opposed to what you, as writer, initially envisioned. This happens all the time.Snow Bride.On Snow Bride, for instance, I didn’t know that the character of Maggie (played by Patricia Richardson, who is lovely) had basically known the true identity of the character of Greta (played by Katrina Law, who is also quite lovely, and my awesome sister-in-law) the entire time until I was 2/3rds of the way through the first draft! I remember when the epiphany hit, saying to myself (out loud, btw): “Oh! Really? Huh. Of course!” Then I went back and made the (as it turns out, minor) adjustments, so it all made sense.Same thing happened recently on Under the Autumn Moon when the character of Josh learned that Alex’s company had very different plans for his ranch than what Alex initially told him. My thoughts when approaching that scene were that he’d be angry with Alex, but when I got there the “Josh” voice basically said, “Nope. I believe this woman.” And I went with it because it was true for his character. So, essentially, in terms of process, I can be organized and deliberate in preparation (beat sheets, outlines, etc.), but when it comes to execution, I allow myself the freedom to see what develops along the way (what the characters themselves tell me) and try my best to embrace those ideas when they materialize because they’re often the best.PB:  Hallmark does close to 90 holiday films a year. Can you fill us in on the process from the writer’s standpoint? Do you pitch ideas? Are ideas pitched to you from development, and how does the network go from idea generation to script to production?TA: At this point, I’ve almost done it all. I’ve had pitches bought, been brought in from the beginning to shape an idea from producers, been hired to adapt books from the start, worked as a co-writer (with Lee Friedlander on three projects now: All for Love, Switched for Christmas, and Love, of Course, which aired for the 2018 Fall Harvest stunt on Hallmark), and done rewrites, both with loads of time and those called “emergency” (when the production is already in place but the script itself isn’t). Emergency rewrites need to take place in a very short amount of time (my record is a page-one rewrite delivered in 3.75 days; I would very much like to keep that as a record I never break, thank you veddy much) and require significant discipline because there is almost no room for error.On the flip side, I just had an original pitch bought two weeks ago by Hallmark that I’m going to be writing with my friend, Kevin Taft, which I’m very excited about! It’s presently called Hannah’s Honeymoon (titles change a lot), and the hope is that it goes in summer (not necessarily this summer, but a summer). I’m also working on another potential summer movie called Camp Lovestruck, which MarVista brought to me for development. And I have a couple ideas that I don’t think will be bought as pitches, but, rather, I’ll have to execute as specs for them to have a chance (you know, when I find the time!).PB:  If someone wanted to tackle this genre, what tips would you give a writer when they are crafting their idea or spec script? What does Hallmark or perhaps Lifetime and Freeform look for specifically? And do the different networks have different agendas and audiences in mind?TA: I’ve primarily worked with the Hallmark Channel with a few at Lifetime and one at Up Network. And all networks work hard to know their audiences, passing on the information they’ve acquired to their writers, directors, actors, etc. People tune into The Hallmark Channel and Freeform for very different reasons, and that’s something writers have to keep in mind when approaching a project, be it as a pitch or a last-minute rewrite. As such, it’s my job as writer to familiarize myself with what that network likes, and that means watching their movies. That’s plural, by the way; the bigger your sample size the better.When I was first approached back in 2013 to come up with an idea for a Hallmark Christmas movie (the producer had a title, I had to come up with the corresponding story, and then the title changed because titles almost always change, but we kept the story), I’d honestly never seen one. But thankfully it was July, and Hallmark does this delightful movie block called “Christmas In July,” and I watched at least 10 in a row (The Most Wonderful Time of the Year is super fun!) so I could familiarize myself with what they liked. Oh, and I took notes. Copious notes. You know that Hallmark Christmas Movies Bingo game that’s been making the rounds the last couple years? I could’ve written that. The challenge for me was how to incorporate those elements — Gingerbread houses! Snow! A Christmas dance! — into a story that was still original and fun, and that ultimately became Snow Bride (2013), a movie that gets a good amount of play even to this day. (I love that one, btw, for a whole host of reasons.)PB: How involved is the writer in the production itself? When you hand in your final draft, is the process done for you, or are you ever asked to do on-the-fly rewrites or be on set?TA: Each production is different. The first two movies I wrote (Snow Bride and Stranded in Paradise) were both directed by the same man (the late Bert Kish, who was one of the kindest, most generous people imaginable), and he very much believed in having the writer around to ask questions. Not all directors are like that, though I find the better ones believe in communicating with the writer(s).Now, the WGA has rules in place that make it so a writer is allowed on-set if they’d like to be, and since I’ve joined the WGA (two years ago), I’ve been invited on every project. The good news/bummer news part of the equation is I’ve been so darned busy (!) writing that I haven’t had time to go to the sets, which have mostly been in Canada. I’m going to try to make a point to get to the set(s) more in the future. That said, there’s really not a whole heckuva lot a writer can do on-location during a three-week production besides get in the way of busy crew and graze the crafts service table (which is never a good idea for someone who works in a profession already known to be sedentary). Most of my work is done before the cameras start rolling, though there are a couple of exceptions when I’ve had to hand in pages after production was already well underway. That was fun. (No, it wasn’t.)Katrina Law joking behind the scenes of Snow Bride (Courtesy of Tracy Andreen)PB:  Finally, where do you see the future of this genre? 90 plus stories a year is ambitious! But clearly there is a hungry audience out there if the ratings are any indication. What stories will you tell?TA: Pretty simple: as long as there’s an audience, these movies will be made. And right now the audience is voracious! There’ve been all sorts of articles written speculating why rom-coms are making a comeback, and specifically Christmas rom-coms are thriving. And the ratings show they are definitely thriving! At a time when almost every other network is seeing declines in their viewers, Hallmark Channel is soaring! I don’t think there’s one specific reason but a convergence of several. They’re safe at a time when the world doesn’t really feel safe. You can watch them with your whole family and not have to worry that something uncomfortable is going to slip in and cause you to have to have awkward conversations. Also? (And this is a big one in my mind.) People love love. Always have, always will. Love stories have been around since the beginning, but the cineplex marketplace isn’t providing love stories anymore, especially romantic comedies, so the viewers who crave them — and there are millions — have turned to the TV movie to feed their appetite. Hallmark Channel recognized this early and leaned into it, hard, and has been greatly rewarded for it in return.As for what stories do I have to tell? Quite a few, I hope! I’m presently doing a rewrite for a Valentine’s Day movie and a revision for a 2019 Christmas film that I hope goes into production in the first quarter of next year. Behind that are several projects (a couple mentioned above) bubbling about in development and far more ideas behind those, so I hope to keep busy for the foreseeable future. As long as people keep devouring romantic movies, and I keep delivering for the people who hire me, I plan to keep right on working because this really is a dream job.Fingers crossed!Looking for more industry interviews? Check these out.Screenwriter James V. Hart on Career, Coppola, and Creating a MethodJonah Hill on Writing and Directing Mid90s — and Tips He Learned from the GreatsIndustry Interview: Advancing Your Career from PA to ADInterview: Jennifer Gatti on Bon Jovi, Star Trek and Longevity in the BusinessInterview: Julie Benz on Work Ethic, Challenging Roles, and Paying it Forwardlast_img read more

Rahul questions Nitish over tragedy

Posted on

first_imgCongress president Rahul Gandhi questioned his one time ally and Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar over the death of nine school children who were crushed by a speeding Bolero vehicle that was allegedly being driven by a drunk BJP functionary. Tweeting in Hindi, Mr. Gandhi said, “In alcohol- free Bihar, a drunk BJP leader killed nine school children. Nitishji, what happened to the voice of your inner conscience? Is this the truth of your ban on alcoholism? Is your conscience protecting the BJP leader or the reality of the alcohol free Bihar?”last_img read more

Normal foot x-ray

Posted on

first_imgAlong with questions of your medical history, your doctor may need to take x-rays of your foot to help aid in making a diagnosis to determine the cause of your foot pain. If the foot is broken it will be put into a cast. Toes that are broken are taped.Review Date:3/1/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington; C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more

a month agoSteve Chettle Exclusive: Collymore like Ronaldo & better than Keane at Nottingham Forest

Posted on

first_imgSteve Chettle Exclusive: Collymore like Ronaldo & better than Keane at Nottingham Forestby Andrew Macleana month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNottingham Forest legend Steve Chettle says Stan Collymore was the most talented footballer he played alongside at the City Ground.An enigmatic and talented centre-forward, Collymore joined Forest from Southend United in 1993 and became a star in his two seasons at the club.His breakthrough culminated in an unbelievable 1994/95 season, in which Collymore’s 22 goals helped Forest finish third in the Premier League.Those performances motivated Liverpool to pay £8.4m for the then 24-year-old, breaking the British record transfer fee at the time.The sale wasn’t a surprise given Forest had sold Neil Webb and Roy Keane to Manchester United, and Nigel Clough to Liverpool, in the years prior to Collymore’s move.Chettle played alongside all four, and when asked who was the most talented of the bunch, the club’s third-highest games holder selected Collymore, who he compared to former Real Madrid and Inter Milan striker Ronaldo Nazario.”Stan Collymore. The best player I’ve played alongside is Stan Collymore,” Chettle told Tribalfootball.com.”He had everything. I’ve compared him, maybe rightly or wrongly, to the old fashioned number nine Ronaldo.”He could do everything, especially the year when we finished third in the Premier League. “He scored some unbelievable goals and he was the best player I played with in a Forest team.”After watching the club as a boy and coming through the academy ranks, Chettle was introduced to the first-team by legendary manager Brian Clough in the late 1980’s.He would go on to play 527 games in 13 years for his boyhood club, winning the League Cup in 1989 and 1990 and playing alongside some legendary players such as Stuart Pearce, Des Walker, Keane and Clough.Quizzed on which was the best team he played in, Chettle split the answer in two.”There were a couple of generations of teams,” he continued. “There was one that I first came into playing alongside Stuart Pearce, Des Walker, Steve Hodge, Neil Webb, Nigel Clough. I used to go away and travel with the England U21s and all those boys in the senior group.”It was a great time to be around that football club and in that team because I was only 19 years old so it was a great learning curve for me. “Then the next phase when I was playing alongside Roy Keane, Steve Stone. We had two kind of generations of fantastic teams so it was kind of a different experience for my career and I like them both as equal.”Video Courtesy of NFFCTube TagsTransfersOpinionAbout the authorAndrew Maclean FollowShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Jimmy Carter Steps Down From The Elders

Posted on

first_imgJimmy Carter is stepping down from his front-line role as a member of The Elders, the organisation said today.The former President of the United States, 91, will hold the title of honorary (“Emeritus”) Elder as of 1 June 2016.The Elders wish to pay tribute to Jimmy Carter’s inspiring and tireless work for the organisation since it was founded in 2007.He has brought his immense experience and expertise to bear on the complex geopolitical issues at the heart of the organisation’s work, and has also been a passionate advocate for women’s rights, social justice, action on climate change and other core Elders’ values.A forthright and principled advocate for human rights and democracy, Jimmy Carter took part in the very first Elders’ mission to Sudan in October 2007, highlighting atrocities and the displacement of millions of people in Darfur.He has also played a key role in every Elders’ delegation to the Middle East, most recently in May 2015 when he led a delegation to Israel and Palestine to draw attention to the humanitarian disaster in Gaza and support those on both sides who favour peace and a two-state solution. This came straight after Jimmy Carter’s participation in an Elders’ meeting with President Putin in Moscow, aimed at securing greater engagement on the Syrian crisis.Kofi Annan, Chair of The Elders, said:“From the Middle East to climate change, women’s rights to superpower diplomacy, Jimmy has brought the gravitas of his Presidential office but also the passion of an activist who believes the world can, and must, be changed for the better. The Elders would not be the organisation it is today without his drive and vision, and he will stay an inspiration for all of us for many years ahead.”last_img read more