杭州水磨

Chelsea Ladies on the verge of title glory

Posted on

first_imgChelsea Ladies will clinch the Women’s Super League title if they win at Manchester City on Sunday – it would also be the first major trophy of the team’s 22-year history.Emma Hayes’ side are top of the table going into the final round of fixtures and would have been crowned champions with last weekend’s win against Everton had other results gone their way.They are two points above second-placed Birmingham City and three clear of reigning champions Liverpool.Their title rivals are both at home, with Birmingham hosting Notts County and Liverpool facing Bristol Academy.“If we win the league I’ll be in dreamland, but we’ve got a really tough game to end the season and I’m not thinking beyond those 90 minutes,” Hayes said.Even if they are pipped to the title, second place would earn them a place in the Champions League for the first time.See also:Two wins and we’re champions – it’s important for us to stay focusedChelsea youngsters score 12 against VillaFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Humboldt Crabs stay hot in 5-4 win over San Luis Obispo Blues

Posted on

first_imgArcata >> Humboldt Crabs first baseman Ryan Myers went 2-for-3 with two RBI and pitcher J.J. Santa Cruz allowed three earned runs over 6-2/3 inning as Humboldt ran its record to an impressive 7-1 with a 5-4 victory over the San Luis Obispo Blues on Tuesday evening at the Arcata Ball Park.As they have done in their seven previous wins, Humboldt got some timely hitting, great defense and steady pitching to pick up its second one-run victory in three days.The Crabs fell behind early when the …last_img read more

Choppers to curb 2010 crime

Posted on

first_imgThe Robinson R44 Raven II, which is nowa part of the South African Police ServiceAir Wing. (Image: SA Air Force) The SAPS already has 31 choppers inits fleet and is expecting the number toincrease to over 40 by mid-2009.(Image: SAPS)Janine ErasmusThe South African Police Service (SAPS) took delivery of two new Robinson R44 Raven II helicopters in October 2008, to strengthen its crime-fighting capabilities ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.The state-of-the-art aircraft, worth R5-million (US$496 000) each, are part of a consignment of six specifically commissioned with 2010 in mind. Armscor, the official procurement arm of the South African Department of Defence, facilitated the purchases from the National Aircraft Company, which specialises in aircraft sales and maintenance, as well as pilot training.The deal was funded by the SAPS 2010 budget, which has seen more than R600-million ($60-million) set aside for the purchase of equipment relating directly to the Fifa World Cup. The other four helicopters will be delivered at the end of November 2008.The SAPS is also anticipating the acquisition of at least five Eurocopter BK117 utility and transport helicopters from the South African National Defence Force in the early part of 2009.According to Minister of Safety and Security Nathi Mthethwa, who presided over the handover, the helicopters are part of government’s 2010 Fifa World Cup capacity-building programme, which is focusing strongly on the air support capabilities of the SAPS.“This acquisition forms part of the procurement of various items of equipment to enhance our capacity to secure the 2010 Fifa World Cup in an efficient and professional manner,” said Mthethwa. “Other specialised equipment already on order includes state-of-the-art water cannons, body armour, portable cameras, high-performance motor vehicles and surveillance equipment.”The craft will be based in Pretoria and dispatched to other host cities when necessary. The SAPS will use them primarily for crime prevention, including organised crime, specialised and intelligence operations, recovery of stolen vehicles, and aerial monitoring of major events, allowing police officers to reach crime scenes quickly.The R44s will also take to the skies for the 2009 Confederations Cup, which takes place in South Africa from 14 to 28 June as a prelude to the big event in 2010. Games will take place in four host cities, namely Johannesburg (Ellis Park stadium, also known as Coca-Cola Park), Pretoria (Loftus Versveld stadium), Bloemfontein (Free State stadium, also known as Vodacom Park), and Rustenburg (Royal Bafokeng stadium).However, emphasised Mthethwa, all equipment bought will be used before and after the football events for general crime prevention tasks. He added that he expects the new helicopters to make a positive impact on crime-fighting in South Africa and will prove to be major assets during what he described as the best World Cup ever.Airborne tacticsThe SAPS Air Wing helicopter fleet currently consists of 13 BO105 twin helicopters, two BK117 twin helicopters, 13 AS350 helicopters and three Hughes 500 helicopters, deployed around South Africa. The new arrivals will boost the fleet to 37. The defence force acquisitions in 2009 will bring the total number of aircraft at the SAPS’s command to over 40.The single-engined Robinson R44 Raven is an American-built four-seater that features an enclosed cabin with two rows of side-by-side seating for a pilot and three passengers. The Raven II is a high-performance machine popular with police forces around the world, with its specialised equipment such as infrared imaging, global positioning system and enhanced radio systems.Studies by law enforcement officials, especially in the US, have shown that a helicopter is the equivalent of at least five ground units in search ability, and gives a tactical advantage during high-speed chases. The various SAPS machines, said Mthethwa, have proven to be one of the most vital and effective tools in the ongoing fight against crime.“The R44 can remain on station for up to three hours when fully fuelled,” he said. “The powerful engine, coupled with an aerodynamic fuselage, enables the aircraft to cruise at up to 209km/h. The R44 is a workhorse, able to fly 24 hours a day, seven days a week – ideally suited to police flying demands.”For the past four years the SAPS has been training pilots as part of a Designated Pilot Training Programme. This uses a screening process to designate various SAPS members, including women, from previously disadvantaged backgrounds for training as fully-fledged pilots by the Air Wing. Training is conducted on the Robinson R44 Raven.Pilots fly at least 100 hours in the R44 until they have enough experience to progress to the larger SAPS turbine helicopters. It is also expected that the new machines will allow the SAPS to train pilots more quickly, with the training period reduced by 18 months, according to Visible Policing Divisional Commissioner Arno Lamoer.High-tech crime fightingThe new additions to the SAPS fleet are equipped with forward looking infrared cameras. This is a type of infrared imaging system that uses detection of thermal energy to assemble a real-time image for video output. It can be used to help pilots and drivers steer their vehicles even at night or in conditions of poor visibility.The wavelength of infrared that this device detects differs from that of night vision aids. The device is often fitted to naval vessels, fixed-wing craft and helicopters, and armoured military vehicles. Its military and civilian uses include surveillance, target tracking and acquisition, warning drivers of animals in the road, locating people through walls during fire-fighting operations, and monitoring active volcanoes.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Related articlesCrime in South AfricaCrime in SA still a challengeSA ready for 2010Useful linksSouth African Police ServiceSouth African Air ForceRobinson R44 RavenArmscorNational Aircraft CompanyStadiums in South AfricaSouth Africa 2010last_img read more

Banyana captain set to return for Ghana game

Posted on

first_img15 May 2014Banyana Banyana captain and central defender Janine van Wyk looks set to return from injury and claim her place in the starting eleven for a friendly match against Ghana at the Dobsonville Stadium in Soweto on Sunday.Van Wyk has been sidelined for almost three months because of a collateral knee ligament strain, which forced her to miss last month’s 2-2 draw with Zimbabwe at the same venue.‘It feels really good to be back’“It’s the first time I am training with the team again, and it feels really good to be back. I have been out for 13 weeks without playing football and doing rehabilitation,” Van Wyk said in a statement on Wednesday.“There are still a few areas I need to work on and get the injury out of my mind. But I am sure I will be ready in the next couple of days.”‘A much tougher opponent than Zimbabwe’Focusing on the challenge awaiting Banyana Banyana on Sunday, she added: “I cannot wait to take the field against Ghana, which I believe will be a much tougher opponent than Zimbabwe. They are more physical, but I think we can compete with them.“The last time we faced the Black Queens, we were able to pip them through a penalty shootout and we are looking to do one better for the fans by defeating them within the allotted 90 minutes,” she concluded.The Sasol-sponsored South African national women’s team is preparing for their forthcoming African Women’s Championship qualifying match against the Comoros at the end of the month, and coach Vera Pauw is impressed with the team’s performance thus far. She believes that the match against Ghana will assist in building a strong team.‘I am impressed’“Preparations are going well,” she said. “We have only had three training sessions together. We had the first explosive training session yesterday, to gain more power and after that we had game time. I am impressed by what I saw.”Looking at lessons learnt in her charges’ last outing, Pauw said: “We have reviewed the previous match against Zimbabwe and feel that we made it easy for them. It was not the individual mistakes that were a concern, but the whole team lacked cohesion in the first 45 minutes.“The match against Ghana could not have come at a better time as we look to intensify preparations ahead of the African Women’s Championship qualifiers against [the] Comoros,” she added.Injury concernDefender Letago Madiba, who plies her trade for Tshwane University of Technology in the Sasol League, remains the only injury concern for the team ahead of the match after sustaining a knee injury during training on Wednesday.Sunday’s match kicks off at 15:00.SAinfo reporter and South African Football Associationlast_img read more

‘Sports should play its part in cementing ties between nations instead of breaking them’

Posted on

first_imgBack to Basics”After offering various new bases like side-tables, showcases and car dashboards, people have finally realised that Lord Ganesh looks best on his mouse next to Goddess Lakshmi.” -RAJNEESH BATRA, Delhi Blasting Myths With pseudo-secularists inflicting more damage on Hinduism than the Mughals and the British, probably the best,Back to Basics”After offering various new bases like side-tables, showcases and car dashboards, people have finally realised that Lord Ganesh looks best on his mouse next to Goddess Lakshmi.” -RAJNEESH BATRA, Delhi Blasting MythsWith pseudo-secularists inflicting more damage on Hinduism than the Mughals and the British, probably the best thing that could happen to modern India is a revival of Hinduism (“The Changing Mood”, November 4). It has to be nurtured carefully and the best people for the job are the young. After all, they are the ones who brought about the Diwali change. Let us hope it is a harbinger of greater and better things. -RANBIR MAHAPATRA, CuttackThe new way of celebrating Diwali is welcome. In fact, the buzzword of togetherness cannot be stressed enough. It should percolate to all the sections of society and replace hatred with love, peace, prosperity and happiness to all. -A. JACOB SAHAYAM, on e-mailShooting from the LipPravinbhai Togadia’s remarks may have been in bad taste but hasn’t the overreaction of the Congress loyalists to his utterances against Sonia Gandhi only confirmed the belief that puppies are the most faithful creatures (“Fountain of Hate”, November 4)? -DR VINOY KUMAR SINHA, RanchiIs it only the congress and other Opposition leaders who have the right to use vituperative remarks against the Sangh Parivar – Rajiv Gandhi called them “Indian dogs”, Madhavrao Scindia branded the BJP babus as “traitors” and Sonia Gandhi called A.B. Vajpayee a “gaddar”? Why were the critics quiet when a foreign author maligned former prime minister Indira Gandhi, leaving it to Maneka Gandhi to clear the debris? -M.S. KILPADY, Mumbai Voice FailWhy is the media making a mountain out of a molehill (“Deep Throat and Other Stories”, November 4)? The prime minister is as susceptible as the rest of us to viral fever and cold – after all, these are attacks which the SPG commandos are unequipped to combat. -MADHU AGRAWAL, on e-mailWhile it is true that one of the factors in bringing the BJP to power was A.B. Vajpayee’s oratorial skills, let us leave his throat alone. Our prime minister is human too. -SANDHYA JOSHI, on e-mailSage AdviceThe kind of rhetoric indulged in by Narendra Modi would have had few takers among Hindus only a few years ago (“In Top Gear”, November 4). But Modi-and others of his ilk-have correctly deduced that 50 years of abuse by Nehruvian secularists and communists have made Hindus resentful. Plagued by a dangerous persecution complex, they are no longer prepared to be lectured to. -V. GANESH, ThiruvananthapuramSpirited PlaySports should play its part in cementing ties between nations instead of breaking them (“Blackballed”, November 4). The cricket boards of Australia, England and Holland should ensure that the game’s spirit scores over politics. Citing security as a concern is inexcusable- how the three teams from the subcontinent played in a packed Colombo stadium in the 1997 World Cup when Australia and West Indies refused for the same reason is now legendary. -ABHINAV ANAND, VaranasiIt Adds Upadvertisement”Instead of helping children succumb to silly dreams, they should be made aware of the need and worth – or lack of it – of coveted things in life.” -ARVIND DAVE, on e-mail Coalition governments formed with some clever arithmetic may rule but they fail to govern (“Holding for Now”, November 4). Now with even the Uttar Pradesh Government in turmoil, it is not difficult to see why the people of Jammu and Kashmir are not optimistic about a coalition government being formed through backdoor deliberations in the state. -WING COMMANDER (RETD) K.K. CHAUDHRY, Delhi BJP MLA and minister in the Uttar Pradesh Government Ameeta Singh was incorrectly referred to as Ameeta Modi in the story on the Mayawati Government. The error is regretted. -EditorArm’s ReachWith North Korea dropping a bombshell by admitting its nuclear weapons programme to Uncle Sam, the chinks in the armour of the recently bolstered US-Pakistan relations are beginning to show (“Unholy Nexus”, November 4). North Korea has set a bad precedent of impudently violating the nuclear non-proliferation treaty it signed with the US. It will not be pessimistic to believe that cash-strapped but technologically advanced nations will now rubbish away non-proliferation accords and indulge in clandestine barter deals with economically powerful nations that want to acquire nuclear know-how. -NALINI VIJAYARAGHAVAN, ThiruvananthapuramRates and RantsThe need of the hour is a drastic slash in the high interest rates, which is affecting the manufacturing sector (“Burden of Plenty”, November 4). The recent slashing of bank rate and CRR by 0.25 per cent by RBI is only a drop in the ocean. Bold steps are required and the interest rate should be immediately cut by at least another 2 per cent to save our economy. -S.N. VARADARAJAN, Coimbatore Faux PowerAll international sports competitions, including athletics, are really a test of a player’s physical fitness, endurance, agility and training (“Behind the Vial”, October 28). Why have those disciplines at all when certain drugs enhance performance? -T.S. CHAWLA, Mohali It is true that success has many fathers but failure has none. Sunita Rani will face humiliation and disgrace for the rest of her life but not one question is directed at the officials who are busy celebrating India’s success at Busan.-SUBHENDRA K. BEHERA, NasikFor Fear or FavourOne fails to understand how even the UN can remain unmoved by the plight of the Iraqis (“Readying for War”, October 28). If no nation dares to speak up for the dignity and human rights being denied to the Iraqis, the day is not far when some other nation may have to bear the brunt of America’s dictatorial attitude. Pastor Niemoeller warned rightly: “First they came for the Jews and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew, then they came for the communists and I did not speak out because I was not a communist, then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist; then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.” -VIVEK KHANNA, ChandigarhRock, Stock and GravelWho are the experts who conclude that NASA’s digital image of the Palk Strait shows that Adam’s Bridge is 1.75 million years old (“Ram’s Bridge to Eternity”, October 28)? The curves are easily explained by anti-clockwise Coriolus forces that erode the coasts of Malaysia, Thailand and Myanmar to deposit silt on Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu coasts and the western Indian coast from Kerala to Gujarat to deposit it on the Arabian and African coasts.-DR A.J. GEORGE KODUMUTTI NADAR, SalemWays to MeansThe government must realise that contract jobs are the order of the day (“Where Have All the Jobs Gone?”, October 28). They encourage efficiency, leaving red tape to rest. Entrepreneurship should be encouraged and business studies taught in secondary schools so that not everyone runs after jobs but some even create them. Only then a ground would be created for generation of employment opportunities. -APARAJITA DASGUPTA, KolkataadvertisementTech Tonic People love to experiment but not necessarily for physical intimacy. -DR NILIMA D. DHARKER, MumbaiSMS is not a gadget to deal with mid-life crisis, only a cheap mode of instant communication. -SHEHLA RAZA HASAN, KolkataGrain of TruthYour story accuses Star News of misrepresentation of facts about starvation deaths in Orissa (“Starved of Veracity”, November 4). Since we were the first channel to report on the alleged starvation deaths of two children in Kuladera village, there was no question of ignoring the denials the children’s parents made on other channels. The parents, however, told me that they were threatened and pressurised by some local leaders and officials into saying their children died due to snakebite, not hunger. Your story also says Mongulu Juango, who we reported was driven out of his village Kuladera, lives in Sumatha. A BPL card was issued to him in Kuladera, where he has a house. While editorially you may have differences with our reporting, the “facts” in this case are clear. -SAMPAD MAHAPATRA, NDTV, BhubaneswarThe article mentions me by name and shows me in poor light as a small-town, part-time journalist who, like many others in Rayagada and Koraput districts, does “sensational stories” on starvation only to serve his own petty interests. I do not need a certificate from your reporter or the state government or any other agency about my commitment to truthful journalistic inquiry. -RANJAN KUMAR RATH, RayagadaSpecial Correspondent Ruben Banerjee replies: INDIA TODAY has a video CD in which Mongulu Juango recounts how he was taken in a jeep from Sumatha to Kuladera for Mahapatra’s filming. In another CD, other bereaved tribals talk of enticements offered for attributing deaths to starvation. As for Juango’s home, we have correctly contradicted the Star News report. Juango lives in Sumatha where he has a house and land, of which we have documentary proof. He also draws rice on his relief card (GRY No. 204059) from Sumatha. Kuladera is the home of his wife. Besides, the local anganwadi worker has recorded that Juango’s son died at Sumatha on August 10 this year. As for Rath’s protests, the National Human Rights Commission has unequivocally debunked his reports on starvation deaths.advertisementlast_img read more