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Peaches and lemons

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first_imgDriving at the legal speed would drastically drop prices. – Fred Coble North Hills Brilliant idea? Re “Planned MTA hikes could strand some” (April 3): Good thinking, MTA: another public-transit hike targeting the working poor, students, senior citizens, residents and those environmentally-politically conscious commuters who are considering taking public transit as an alternative to driving their cars. If Los Angeles County’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority and our elected officials invested in a free public-transit system in the region’s major tourist destinations – Hollywood, Universal City, downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica – they might actually achieve their stated goal to increase ridership and get more automobiles off the road, which just might result in less money needed to repair, repave, elevate or tunnel under our already distressed streets-highways infrastructure. – Laurie Golden Woodland Hills The bottom line Re “Paid too much” (March 29): The business owners have to look out for the bottom line. You can’t fault them for that. I believe they should also trim costs at the upper-management level. Remember that the salespeople make commissions as well. If you ever need sales help in a store, just pick up a high-price item and you have help in no time. The other side of the coin is that you have the return factor. The sales representative makes high-dollar pay and sells the highest-price item; then the customer returns it because, in most cases, the sales rep lied about the function of the item just to get the sale. The store loses big-time because now the item is sold at a loss. – Mike Hoblinski Burbank Nuñez doesn’t get it Re “Cardinal against `culture of death”‘ (April 3): In reading Fabian Nuñez’s response to Cardinal Roger Mahony’s homily regarding the proposed bill on physician-assisted suicide, I’m disappointed that Fabian never “got it.” Christ’s teachings are not democratic; nor are they a menu from which to choose. In Luke 18:18-22, we read Jesus’ response to a question posed to him by a rich official. While the answers are not always what we want to hear, his message remains the same: “Come follow me.” – Max S. Duran Acton Distribution of funds Re “A donor state” (Your Opinions, April 4): Mayor Villaraigosa and his political friends almost had me convinced that taking from those who have and giving it to those who may have less was a good thing. Now they are confusing me by complaining that the federal government is not giving California its “fair share” of federal funds by giving more to states that have less. Is taking from those who have and giving to those who have less a good thing? – Bill Zelenka Granada Hills Reyes responds Re “Kiss 200 good jobs goodbye” (April 1): The article that implies that my support of a park plan at Taylor Yard over a manufacturing plant in my district will lead to the loss of 200 jobs is simple-minded and shortsighted. The article fails to mention that the park plan is part of a systemwide Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan that the City Council and mayor are poised to adopt in the coming weeks. That plan, which includes job creation among its goals, was forged by thousands of residents through countless public workshops. I am astounded by the quote in the article that “There’s a lot of places you can put a park.” Perhaps in their neck of the woods that’s true, but in my park-poor district, those opportunities are few and far between. I will not sell out that opportunity for the sake of 200 temporary jobs with no guarantee that any of them will go to the local neighborhood. Manufacturing jobs are important, but so are the people who will fill them. A site solution to this specific plant can be found, I assure you. – Ed P. Reyes Councilman First District Marching orders The Daily News has painted an incomplete portrait of the school board race between incumbent Jon Lauritzen and Tamar Galatzan in the dramatic “Lauritzen’s betrayal” editorial (April 3). While you write about “political hacks who take their marching orders from the special interests that fund them,” you don’t say who’s funding Galatzan. She is a puppet of downtown business interests: a lawyer married to Brendan Huffman, the business-interest activist crusading against the “living-wage” ordinance. Do you really want lobbyist Harvey Englander in charge of your children’s education? – Marshall Abernathy Woodland Hills Olympic committee In reference to the April 2 Daily News Opinion piece titled “Playing Games: Getting the Olympics to L.A. is not the public’s priority,” I’m happy to clarify the funding issue. Just as in 1984, we seek no public money and expect to need no public money. We do need a bid that is second to none in the competition. To be eligible to be selected to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the International Olympic Committee now requires guarantees of the sort our government officials have so enthusiastically endorsed. We thank them and our fellow citizens. – Barry Sanders Chairman Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games Mail-in voting Re “City ponders vote by mail ballots” (Tipoff, April 2): It is high time that the city starts thinking outside of the voting box. I can’t think of a more important service to provide to voters than using every conceivable means to make it convenient and accessible in order to encourage a strong turnout at every election day. The proposed mail-in system makes sense, as do weekend-voting days. And, since a mail-in system saves money, maybe we could vote on where the “surplus” will be spent – i.e., to repair city streets and sidewalks. – Ellen Vukovich Sherman Oaks Misperceptions Re “Without oversight” by Jennifer Rabuchin (Your Opinions, April 3): The president does serve the people, which he is trying to do in Iraq, if only the immoral Democrats would quit playing politics and give the troops the money they need. If they want to defund the war, then do it, but don’t put the troops at risk to make political points. Also, the Democrats are no strangers to deficits, having run them from the 1950s to the 1990s, and they are looking to run more deficits in the current Congress. I don’t know why Jennifer is unhappy with the unemployment numbers (about 4.5 percent) since they are better than anything the Democrats could do in the last 40 years. – Dana Franck Glendale160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Re “Tie him to a chair” (Your Opinions, April 3): Professional golfer Chi Chi Rodriguez said, “I read the greens in Spanish, but putt in English.” Your Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa reminds me of Chi Chi. For Ken Thatcher Sr. to compare Antonio to former boring Mayor “Sad” Sam Yorty is tantamount to comparing a Georgia peach to a Barstow lemon. – Bob Ginn Arcadia Ask yourself I am not saying Democrats have slipped, but when you remember that President Harry Truman said “Give them hell” and, now Sen. Harry Reid says “Give it up,” you can ask yourself who is looking out for you. – Joseph Nicassio Valencia Price at the pump last_img

Remembering our heroes

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first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Today, many Americans confuse Memorial Day with Veterans Day, which honors veterans of all wars and is observed in November. This is an unfortunate, and all too common, misunderstanding. While it’s good and appropriate to honor all vets, it’s also crucial to pay tribute specifically to the ones who never came home. These are the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country and for all of us. Yet worse than the confusion about Memorial Day is our tendency to forget about its significance altogether. Because the day is part of a three-day weekend and marks the unofficial start of summer, we can easily get so caught up in barbecues and pool parties that we neglect to even give our nation’s fallen heroes a passing thought. That is a shame. And with the ranks of those fallen heroes growing every day in battles in Afghanistan and Iraq, we have no excuse for our forgetfulness – and all the more reason for gratitude. By all means, let’s enjoy the day, the barbecues, the road trips, the moments with friends and family. These are the fruits of the freedom and security that our heroes died to preserve. But let’s also be sure to honor them at our cemeteries, in our houses of worship, at our parades or even just around the table at our gatherings. For all they gave us, it is truly the very least we can do in return.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHEN Americans first started observing what’s now known as Memorial Day in the late 1860s, there was no confusion or doubt about the holiday’s purpose. The pain, grief and horrific losses of the Civil War – America’s most devastating war ever – still seared the memory. Few Americans were without loved ones who not only fought, but died in the War Between the States, and they took seriously the need to honor those lost souls. After World War I, the day expanded to include fallen American servicemen in all of America’s wars. And when President Richard Nixon formally made Memorial Day a national holiday in 1971 amid the mounting carnage in Vietnam, there was also little mystery about the day’s purpose. Sadly, that’s not the case any more. last_img read more

Ray Ratto: Sharks learn series won’t be simple; what else is new?

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first_imgYou almost certainly watched the Battle of Winterfell rather than Avalanche-Sharks 2 because, well, most of your chums and chumettes at work would be talking about it a lot more readily than the second game of this dysrhythmic series.You did the right thing. Besides, there are going to be lots more games in this series. Sunday night pretty well guaranteed that.Colorado’s 4-3 victory in Game 2 of this series at Le Centre du SAP was essentially as head coach Jared Bednar would have wanted it in …last_img read more

No new U.S. classic scrapie cases since April 2016

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the January 2017 National Scrapie Eradication Program (NSEP) report, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service conveyed that no new positive U.S. classical scrapie cases have been reported in either sheep or goats in fiscal year 2017, which runs Oct. 1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2017. Also, no new infected or source flocks have been identified in fiscal year 2017.In fact, the last case of classical scrapie was reported in April 2016. This is the longest period without a positive case since the beginning of the NSEP.As of Jan. 31, 2017, there were two open infected and source flock statuses for classical scrapie. One flock was designated as a Nor98-like source flock in October 2016 as a result of a sheep sampled in September 2016 that tested positive.RSSS started April 1, 2003. It is a targeted slaughter surveillance program which is designed to identify infected flocks. Samples have been collected from 531,701 animals since April 1, 2003. There have been 480 NVSL confirmed positive animals* (471 classical cases and 9 Nor98-like cases) since the beginning of RSSS. As of January 31, 2017, 11,197 samples have been collected in FY 2017, 9,551 from sheep and 1,646 from goats.The January report is available at www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/scrapie/downloads/monthly_scrapie_report.pdf.last_img read more

South Korea has big gold medal day at Asian Games

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first_imgAn established Olympic swimming superstar and a seven-month pregnant shooter helped South Korea to one of its best days at the Asian Games on Sunday.Park Tae-hwan, the 400-meter freestyle gold medalist at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, won the 200 freestyle in the Asian Games pool, leading throughout to break his own Asian record.Hours earlier, Gim Yun-mi, who is expecting a child in two months, helped out as South Korea swept all four shooting gold medals to give it nine on the day overall.The games also had a first world record – China’s Li Ping won the women’s 53-kilogram weightlifting division. She broke an eight-year-old world mark in the snatch when she lifted 103 kilograms, then lifted 127 in the clean and jerk to earn another world record for the combined total at 230 kilograms.China collected 18 golds Sunday and moved to a leading 37 on the second day of competition at the Games, which end Nov. 27. South Korea has 13 gold medals overall. Japan is in third place with eight golds and Hong Kong is next with two gold.China topped the medal count at the last Asian Games in Doha with 166 gold medals and is on its way to repeating that. There are 476 gold medals to be awarded in Guangzhou.South Korean shooter Lee Dae-myung won the men’s 10-meter air pistol and helped secure a victory in the team competition on the second morning. Later, Gim won the women’s 10-meter air pistol and helped South Korea win the women’s team gold.”I got the gold medal with my baby, I feel so happy,” Gim said through an interpreter.advertisementJia Rui helped deliver Macau’s first-ever gold medal at the Asian Games by winning the Daoshu/Gunshu all-round title in the Chinese martial arts of Wushu.Macau had won five silver and 10 bronze medals in previous Asian Games, but the 23-year-old individual world champion clinched Sunday’s gold with an acrobatic routine involving flips and fast sword movement.”In Macau, wushu is a hobby for many people, and this will be a big step for the sport in my country,” he said.India, meanwhile, won its first gold of the games when Pankaj Advani beat Nay Thway Oo of Malaysia 3-2 in men’s English billiards.Japanese triathletes finished first and second in the men’s race just 24 hours after two of their female compatriots took the major medals in the women’s event.On Sunday, Yuichi Hosoda and Ryosuke Yamamoto finished one-two to make Japan the undisputed triathlon champions of the Asian Games. On Saturday, Mariko Adachi and Akane Tsuchihashi of Japan won gold and silver, respectively, in the women’s race.At the Asian Games pool, Park broke the Chinese domination that has seen the host country win nine golds in 12 finals over two nights.Japanese star Kosuke Kitajima failed to win his 50-meter breaststroke heat in the morning and struggled again in the final, finishing 0.35 seconds behind winner, China’s Xie Zhi, to end up in a dead heat for fourth with Iran’s Mohammad Alirezaei Dizicheh. Kitajima’s teammate Ryo Tateishi was second.The 50 distance is not the 28-year-old Japanese star swimmer’s best event – he swept the 100 and 200 Olympic titles in Athens and Beijing. Still, failing to land a medal at all is a worrying sign heading into his signature events in Guangzhou.Kitajima said the competition was simply too strong.”Even though it’s my best result of this year, I did not get a medal,” he said. “I’ll try my best in the 100-meter breaststroke later.”last_img read more