Issue ads for Indore, Bhopal, taunts Kamal Nath

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first_imgMadhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath on Saturday taunted the BJP for the delay in announcing candidates for the Indore and Bhopal Lok Sabha seats, both considered its strongholds. He said that the BJP should issue advertisements inviting suitable candidates for the two seats. Senior leader and former CM Digvijaya Singh is the Congress’ nominee from Bhopal while the BJP is yet to announce its candidate. The seat has been held by the BJP since 1989 and the 2014 polls was won by Alok Sanjar who defeated the Congress’ P.C. Sharma by a margin of over 3.70 lakh votes. Indore is represented since 1989 by Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan. “The BJP is breaking out into a sweat. It should issue an advertisement to find candidates,” Mr. Nath said.On a demand that Guna MP Jyotiraditya Scindia be fielded from Indore, Mr. Nath said Mr. Scindia’s case was “different”. ‘Different case’“Mr. Scindia is a sitting MP. There is his own area which he has been representing. So his case is different. There is no such question unless he himself takes any decision,” he said.He also predicted that the Congress would win 22 out of 29 LS seats in the State.last_img read more

Bombay HC extends protection to Gautam Navlakha till April 15

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first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Monday extended protection from arrest of activist Gautam Navlakha till April 15, 2019 in the Bhima Koregaon violence case.A division bench of Justices Ranjit More and Bharati Dangre was hearing a plea filed by Mr. Navlakha urging the court to quash the FIR registered against him by Pune police.Advocate Yug Chaudhary appearing for Mr. Navlakha had earlier told another Bench that the Delhi High Court had quashed the arrest, but the Maharashtra government filed a special leave petition in Supreme Court against it, but another Bench at the Bombay HC stayed the arrest. Therefore, the arrest remains quashed as of now.He had said the special leave petition filed by the Maharashtra government in the case will be heard by the apex court in four weeks. and suggested the matter be heard after that.However, the additional government pleader Aruna Kamat Pai had objected to that and the court had said, “If there is no interim order what is the prejudice to you?”Mr. Navlakha has been charged under various sections of IPC and UAPA. The matter will now be heard on April 15.last_img read more

‘Gathbandhan is the biggest thing I have’

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first_imgThe odds are stacked against the Opposition in Lucknow. The BJP has won the seat consecutively since 1991 with former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee winning five terms while his lieutenant Lalji Tandon was elected in 2009. In 2014, Rajnath Singh, now Union Home Minister, won handsomely, defeating his nearest rival by 2.72 lakh votes.But Poonam Sinha believes the “euphoria was different” then and says the BJP government has “absolutely wasted” the last five years in matters of governance.“That is one of the main reasons why our Gathbandhan (alliance) has become so strong. Whenever I talk to people, I can see they want a change,” Ms. Sinha told The Hindu.Picked by the Samajwadi Party, rather to the surprise of both locals and observers, to fight the BJP in one of its strongest urban bastions, Ms. Sinha is making her electoral debut. She joined the SP just a fortnight ago to become the face of the alliance on this prestigious seat. Ms. Sinha brings along with her a mix of Sindhi and Kayastha identity — her husband Shatrughan Sinha, a Congress candidate from Patna Sahib in Bihar, is a Kayastha — and the communities have a fair share of members here.‘No shortcoming’But she faces the challenge of familiarising herself with the city with which she has little political connection. Her opponent, Mr. Singh, though from Chandauli in Purvanchal, has served as Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, providing him plenty of personal linkages in the State capital. Ms. Sinha says the outsider tag is not at all a shortcoming. “I am really touched by the warm welcome and the acceptance that they (people) are giving me. I really feel great and I’m happy I chose Lucknow,” she said.The SP candidate also hopes to cash in on the image of her party chief Akhilesh Yadav and the work done here under his tenure as CM from 2012 to 2017. “Our leader thinks forward. He doesn’t think backward, unlike this government which is trying to undo whatever good work Akhilesh ji has done in his tenure,” Ms. Sinha said.While Lucknow’s sizeable Muslim population would offer Ms. Sinha a decent share of base votes, a real challenge to Mr. Singh would rely on her cutting into the majority community votes, especially her own Kayasthas and Sindhis and the Brahmins and Banias. So what arithmetic does she have with her? “The Gathbandhan. That’s the biggest thing I have,” she says, avoiding references to any caste. Ms. Sinha says among her top priorities would be women’s safety and security and to provide accommodation like hostels to working women who come from rural U.P. to the city. Pramod Krishnam, the seer-politician fielded by the Congress in Lucknow, said he, and not Ms. Sinha, was going to defeat Mr. Singh as the Congress and BJP were locked in an ideological battle.‘Nuisance value’ Ms. Sinha, however, dismissed him saying his candidature was “just nuisance value” and the she was the “main challenger”.Fighting from his home district of Sambhal as a Congress candidate in 2014, Mr. Krishnam had secured only 16,000 votes. In 2014, the Congress was runner-up in Lucknow with 2.88 lakh votes, but its candidate Rita Bahuguna Joshi shifted to the BJP later and is now a Cabinet Minister in the Yogi Adityanath government.The SP-BSP also have a steep climb. In 2014, SP’s candidate Abhishek Mishra and the BSP’s Nakul Dubey, both Brahmins, had managed only 56,771 and 64,449 votes, respectively.last_img read more

Om Prakash Rajbhar denies his party MLAs are set to join BJP

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first_imgTwo days after Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath sacked him from the Ministry, Om Prakash Rajbhar on Wednesday put up a brave face, saying his party’s legislators stood united with him.Rubbishing reports that three Suheldev Bharatiya Samaj Party (SBSP) MLAs were planning to shift to the BJP, Mr. Rajbhar dismissed them as “rumours”. He said Triveni Ram, Ramanand Baudh and Kailash Nath Sonkar were standing “like a rock” with the party. “We are comrades of a common struggle. The BJP can try all it wants but its schemes won’t succeed,” Mr. Rajbhar tweeted.Mr. Baudh came out in the support of his leader. Mr. Rajbhar is a “great man” who fights for the rights of Dalits, backwards and the poor, he said. “We reject slavery. BJP wanted us to be slaves. We are standing with the SBSP with full force. I will never leave the party,” he said.Mr. Adityanath sacked Mr. Rajbhar for his open rebellion against the BJP during the Lok Sabha election, with the SBSP not only fielding more than 40 candidates to hurt the BJP but also openly campaigning for candidates of the Opposition Congress and SP-BSP alliance. Mr. Rajbhar has regularly targeted the BJP for not implementing the recommendations of a social justice committee calling for sub-categorisation of the OBC quota that would benefit the most-backward castes including his own, Rajbhars.Mr. Rajbhar had been on the warpath against the BJP after it denied him ticket on his own symbol. The BJP wanted him to contest from the Ghosi seat in Purvanchal on its symbol.last_img read more

Slideshow: Tarantulas Loved to Extinction?

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first_imgMorkelskerFound in the Kitulgala Forest Reserve of southern Sri Lanka, the fringed ornamental (Poecilotheria ornata) inflicts a painful bite. Like other tarantulas, its venom is not fatal to humans. Laurence LivermoreThe brown parachute spider (Poecilotheria subfusca) comes from south-central Sri Lanka. Scientists surveying their habitat from 2003 to 2005 found only 20 individuals. Brent MooreThe striated parachute spider (Poecilotheria striata) is popular among pet traders and collectors. It’s found across 2000 km2 of the Western Ghats in India, where its habitat continues to decline. BayLee’s 8 Legged ArtThe beautiful parachute spider (Poecilotheria formosa) lives in the Eastern Ghats in southern India and is poorly known. Males have never been discovered. Zoological Survey of IndiaThe Rameshwaram parachute spider (Poecilotheria hanumavilasumica) was discovered in 2004 in a sacred grove on Rameshwaram Island in southern India. They ambush insects. BayLee’s 8 Legged ArtThe reddish parachute spider (Poecilotheria rufilata) ambushes prey and has been seen capturing young bats. They are smuggled from India into Europe and America for the pet trade. Spiders may not be the most cuddly of species, but some are so prized by collectors that their existence could be in peril. The pet trade is one of the reasons that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) this week took a step toward putting 11 species of tarantula on its list of endangered species. This slideshow highlights some of these colorful species and their natural history.The spiders live in India and Sri Lanka, so the main impact of listing them would be to generally prohibit their importation or sale within the United States. Most of the species live in trees and are threatened by deforestation. Some will enter homes, where people kill them. All of them are threatened by collection for the pet trade. The reddish parachute spider (Poecilotheria rufilata), in particular, is difficult to breed in captivity, and requires wild individuals.Brent Hendrixson, a spider biologist at Millsaps College in Jackson, says that habitat destruction is most likely the largest threat to the tarantulas. “It might be a stretch to say that overcollecting is driving the numbers down,” he says. “We don’t have any concrete data on exports from India or Sri Lanka in terms of wild-caught animals.” Most of the individuals in the United States have been propagated through captive breeding programs, he adds. The peacock tarantula (Poecilotheria metallica), in particular, is well suited because it is easy to breed and grows rapidly. They’re also stunningly beautiful.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In 2010, a group called WildEarth Guardians in Santa Fe petitioned FWS to list species of the genus Poecilotheria and on Tuesday, the agency agreed that there’s enough science to warrant further review. That is supposed to take a year, but often stretches out longer. FWS will accept public comments until 3 February. Søren RafnThe peacock tarantula (Poecilotheria metallica) is known only from a small forest reserve in Andhra Pradesh, India. Like others in the genus, they make funnel webs inside deep crevices of old growth trees. B. SmithThe wonderful parachute spider (Poecilotheria miranda) gets its name because males will sail down from trees to the ground. The population, in the Chhota Nagpur region of northeast India, is thought to be decreasing.last_img read more

The E.U. Is the Problem on GM Crops, Say U.K. Scientists

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first_imgThe use of genetically modified (GM) crops in Europe is being hampered by a “dysfunctional approval process” imposed by the European Union, says a U.K. government-sponsored report released today. As a result, only a handful of GM crops may be approved in the near future, according to the Council for Science and Technology, which advises the U.K. prime minister on science policy.While stating that the unanimous scientific consensus is that GM crops are safe, the report, whose authors include prominent plant biologists and biotechnologists, criticizes the European Union for regulation that has fettered progress of the technology and risk assessments that have been “influenced by political considerations that do not have a scientific basis.”The council is jointly chaired by Mark Walport, the government’s chief scientific adviser, who was an author on the report. “We’re asking for the regulation to be fit for purpose,” Walport says. Co-author Jim Dunwell, a plant biotechnologist at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom, adds: “There has been an accumulation of regulation in a nonscientific way.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Anyone seeking to release a GM organism in Europe has to get approval from Brussels. Applications are assessed largely by the European Food Safety Authority. As yet, only one variety, Bt maize, is grown and its crops are concentrated in Spain. None are grown in the United Kingdom. A vote in February to approve another variety of GM maize saw opposition from most nations, including France, Italy, and Austria. There was support, however, from Spain, Finland, Sweden, Estonia, and the United Kingdom.This is not the first time that British GM researchers have complained about E.U. red tape hampering their work. A purple tomato rich in an antioxidant pigment, recently developed at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, U.K., for instance, has had to be grown in Canada for future research and to attract commercial interest.Instead of the current regulatory system, in which new plant varieties are assessed according to the process used to produce them, the authors suggest that a product-based approach could be adopted, similar to the procedure already used in Canada. This would put the trait above the process so a plant variety produced using GM technology would be treated in the same way as an identical variety produced via conventional plant breeding.“What really matters is the regulation of the trait rather than the method,” says Jonathan Jones of the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, one of the authors of the report. “The regulation of the technology is not proportionate. … It’s time to remove the red flags.”The report calls for Europe to take a step back by delegating final approval of commercial crop cultivation to individual nations. One route, it suggests, might be for the United Kingdom to create an authority that would be the GM equivalent to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which vets medicines for use in the United Kingdom. The European Union, meanwhile, could keep an advisory role on risk and safety.  The U.K. government already takes a positive line on GM crops.  In January, the environment secretary, Owen Paterson, told a farming conference in Oxford that Europe risks becoming “the museum of world farming” if it continues to reject GM crops.In a letter to the prime minister which accompanies the report, the authors state: “The longer the E.U. continues to oppose GM whilst the rest of the world adopts it, the greater the risk that E.U. agriculture will become uncompetitive, especially as more GM crops and traits are commercialized successfully elsewhere.”Dunwell also notes that African farmers successfully growing GM bananas and cassavas for themselves and for export are placed in a commercial quandary by the European Union’s anti-GM stance. “Allow independent E.U. states to go their own way,” he says.The last major U.K. report on GM crops, produced by Britain’s Royal Society in 2009, backed the technology. In particular, it outlined the urgent need to increase food production globally and the importance of science in meeting that demand. Public opposition, however, continues and anti-GM pressure groups continue to attack research. In 2012, a GM wheat trial at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, U.K., was vandalized by a protestor.John Pickett, who has worked on the wheat trials at Rothamsted Research and is a co-author of the report, says: “The best way to address these concerns is actually to carry out the experiments and assess the potential of newly developed plants to offer solutions to specific agricultural problems.”To this end, the report offers one final suggestion: “A new programme of independent research to field test ‘public good’ GM crops.” Named PubGM, it would assess traits produced by both private and public scientists for potential commercialization. But, adds Jones, “I don’t know exactly how it will work.”last_img read more

Video of tribe’s first contact shows both tension and friendly overtures

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first_imgToday the Brazilian Indian affairs department, FUNAI, posted an 8-minute video (also above) of a complex contact episode between members of an isolated tribe and outsiders, some of whom appear to be Brazilian officials. Seven tribespeople first made contact in late June along the Upper Envira River in western Brazil, and subsequently contracted influenza. After being treated by a FUNAI medical team, the tribespeople, ranging in age from about 12 to 21, returned to their Amazon forest village.The video shows young tribesmen, all male, interacting with what appears to be the Brazilian government contact team and local villagers. In the first 2 minutes of video, the young men gesture from across a river at officials and villagers. According to anthropologist Kim Hill of Arizona State University, Tempe, they frequently repeat words in the Panoan language family meaning “friend” as well as “good or beautiful.” Later (minute 3:04), the tribesmen accept bananas, a welcome gift of exchange among isolated people in the area. But one appears to be carrying a rifle (minute 3:40). And the young men then take cloth, a machete, and an ax from a household, (minute 6:18), despite repeated shouts of “No!”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)FUNAI has a history of filming contacts with tribal people and making them public, and these videos are valuable, says anthropologist Robert Walker of the University of Missouri, Columbia. “It’s kind of good to know what happened, and it shows how complicated these situations are,” Walker says. But Walker is struck by the strained nature of some of the filmed episodes. The young tribesmen in the video, “want axes, machetes, and cloths, and they probably want food,” he says. “But FUNAI did not provide this for them, because they are so completely underfunded.”There was plenty of opportunity for misunderstanding, he adds. “It’s not like a nice, sustained contact. Things are still really sketchy.”last_img read more

New screen design could extend smart phone battery life

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first_imgA brightly lit smart phone display looks good, but drains the battery quickly. Much of this can be blamed on a screen component called a polarizer. Light points in all directions, which can be mathematically broken down into two parts that are perpendicular to each other. A polarizer allows only one of the two to pass through, which is required for liquid-crystal display (LCD) screens to work but wastes at least 50% of the light. In practice, most polarizers waste much more. In a study published this month in Optica, researchers report a newly designed polarizer with much higher energy efficiency. The scientists etched a 3D nanoscale pattern on a piece of silicon, which enabled the polarizer to interact with and manipulate light. When they shone infrared light through their polarizer, the pattern on the silicon allowed light in one direction to pass through and rotated its perpendicular counterpart by 90°, thereby letting it pass through as well. The researchers achieved a maximum polarizer efficiency of 74%, they report. The technique needs to be extended to visible light before it can be utilized in LCDs and extend devices’ battery lives. But the team says that if it can optimize the approach, such displays could extend battery life and enable brighter screen settings in future smart phones.last_img read more

Smoke from distant fires could create more deadly tornadoes

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first_imgSmoke from fires in Mexico and Central America may have worsened one of the largest tornado outbreaks in recent decades, a new study suggests. In the afternoon and evening of 27 April 2011, more than 120 tornadoes ravaged a swath of the southeastern United States, killing 313 people. (Tornado shown, which occurred later that year, was not part of the historic outbreak.) At the same time, meteorologists noted several layers of smoke-filled air over the region that could be tracked back to fires set to clear agricultural lands for spring planting in eastern Mexico and Central America. Researchers have now used a computer model to assess the possible effects of smoke on the region’s weather that day. In the simulations that included smoke-filled air, storm clouds were lower and thicker (and average wind speeds at 1 kilometer above ground were higher) than they were in the no-smoke models, the team reported online ahead of print in Geophysical Research Letters. The smoke-induced increase in wind speed at an altitude of 1 km enhanced a phenomenon called wind shear, the difference in wind velocity between one layer of the atmosphere and another. Although lower, thicker storm clouds and increased wind shear don’t directly cause tornadoes, they have been shown to intensify a tornado’s strength if one does form. As a result, the presence of smoke wafting into a region from distant fires should be included in weather models, the researchers say.last_img read more

Four ways in Which Girls Are Changing Sports in India

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first_imgstories from around the country on how sport is empowering girls and breaking barriers. Related Itemslast_img

India Should Tread Carefully on Missile Sale to Vietnam

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first_imgIt’s important for India not to go out of its way to involve itself in China’s maritime disputes. Related Itemslast_img

The Magic Broth

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first_imgFrom birth to marriage to death, if you are Indian, there is no escaping dal, the humble lentil which signifies life itself. Dal is one of the first solid foods a baby is fed and it is part of the funeral rituals when life ends and the soul takes flight. In fact, you cannot even get married without dal! A Tamil phrase – paruppu illaada kalyanamaa? – puts it succinctly: “How can there be a wedding without dal?”Dals, better known as pulses or lentils, grow and are dried on the vine before being hulled and split, providing the building blocks for many fulfilling meals. They are part of the legume family, which also consists of beans and peas.In America, walk into any Indian grocery store and you see the push and pull of immigrant life, people fitting into their shopping baskets the aura of a lost world – bags of basmati rice, desi vegetables and always packets and packets of dal. Mainstream Americans would be shocked at the volume of lentils these new Americans consume, but then dal is so much more than mere food, it’s a link to loved ones left behind, to a fast vanishing way of life. Life without dal meant life without extended family.For new immigrants in a new world where everything seems disjointed and out of focus, a bowl of dal can gives life normalcy, The earliest Indian immigrants did not have the luxury of Indian groceries-on-demand as we have today and had to make do with strange, supermarket variety of lentils and chapattis conjured out of white flour. It was this lack of Indian dry goods that led so many entrepreneurs, especially those from Gujarat, to import ethnic foods from India. For the millions of immigrants who have left India for the far corners of the world, dal remains a common shared experience. It would be hard to find an Indian who does not know the taste of dal, because it is one dish common to almost every regional cuisine in India. Every immigrant has a dal story to tell. The 1947 partition had ricocheted my family from Sindh to Delhi as hrefugees, but their vanished homeland lived on in their cuisine. Every Monday, lunch was white rice and a pot of steaming toovar dal with a tarka of cumin, mustard seeds and asafetida, with a side of home-made potato chips to give the meal crunch.On days of celebrations as well as shraddhas or death ceremonies, uncles, aunts and cousins would gather together for the rituals and lunch. The main dish in the feast would be Sindhi besan curry, made from ground channa dal, which would be simmered for hours with kukum flowers and tamarind until the aroma seeped through the entire house. Even before the prayer ceremonies were over, the sizzling sound and fragrance of frying sana pakoras – chopped onions, coriander leaves and green chilies dipped in a batter of ground dal – would signal to all the young hungry cousins,  dutifully bound by spiritual matters,  that salvation was near at hand: lunch was about to be served!There’s a Hindi saying – Dal, dal bacheray pal – dal, the nurturer of children. Lentils come from the soil and there’s a down to earth goodness about them. Indeed, dal is surely the mother of all India, churned from the depths, the very womb of the earth, it sustains and satisfies. It is a staple food for the masses – the phrase dal roti signifies livelihood. Cooked with herbs and spices, it can be poetry for the soul, and when simmered in Moghlai style with cream and butter, it is a meal fit for emperors. Lentils come in many varieties and colors – red, green, black, orange, yellow, brown and white with names like toovar, moong, channa,  urad and masoor – and when cooked, these seeds form a rich vocabulary of different tastes, textures and fragrances. They also enrich the soil they grow in with nitrates, and farmers often use the same soil to grow other crops.While rice and wheat have been primary foods,dals are an ancient food and have been very much a part of the Indian cuisine for thousands of years. A prayer in the Yajurveda, composed around 800 BC  mentions lentils such as masura  (masoor), mudga (mung), masha (urad) and klaya (matter).According to K.T. Achaya who wrote the seminal Indian Food: A Historical Companion, early Buddhist and Jain canonical literature first mentioned “new” pulses such as adhaki (tuvar), chanaka (chana) and alisandaga (which may be today’s kabuli chana and came from Alexandria). In those days pulses were eaten as soups (supa or yusa), vatakas (vadas) and parpatas (papads).Even the Gods favor dals. The mighty Tirupati temple dedicated to Lord Venkateshwara doles out thousands and thousands of laddus as prasadam every day made out of urad dal, sugar and nuts.  The channa dal served in the mahaprasadam at the famous Jagganath Temple of Orissa to over 100,000 devotees a day along with other foods, is particularly well-known.Ask any immigrant and each will have a story about the memories dal evokes.  One may remember amma’s steamy sambar, another may talk of the dal puri eaten in a wayside dhaba, and yet another of the special dal served in a childhood friend’s home. Dal was served at celebrations and religious ceremonies with many other celebratory foods, but dal was also there – cooked simply in a khichari, a mild porridge – when you were sick as a child and got to miss school. Dal was central to so many family meals, that in a way it signifies family togetherness and warmth.“Indians knew the versatility of legumes long before many civilizations even heard of them,” writes culinary expert Julie Sahni. “At the shradha, a Vedic Indian ritual paying homage to a dead relative, a feast consisting of several courses, all containing legumes, is still prepared in its full tradition today.”India may be a blend of different cultures, religions and colors, but almost every region of India agrees on one thing – dal. Each community may have its own methods of cooking it, but all share a fondness for its homey concoctions. In fact, there are families who eat dal every single day at every meal. Rich in protein, it has been the poor man’s sustenance, giving the energy needed for hard labor. For the many vegetarian cultures in India, dal is central to their diet. Dals are a quick change artiste than can be transformed into many different foods from snacks to appetizers to soupy main courses and even desserts. In Classic Indian Cooking, Sahni explains that both urad (white split gram bean) and channa dal (yellow split peas) do double duty in south and southwestern India as a spice. These are generally cooked in oil with mustard seeds and used as a  flavoring for dumplings and vegetable preparations. Channa dal is also ground to a powder or flour and used as a thickener in making sweet and fudge preparations, and even as batter for frying pakoras.Almost every state has its own favorite version of dal, from the moong dal with black mustard seeds of the Maharashtra Brahmins, who do not use garlic, to the elaborate Lakhnawi Khatti dal, a rich classic from Lucknow, which Sahni describes as “fragrant with garlic and fresh ginger root and laced with black cumin seed flavored oil. The characteristic feature of this dal is the tamarind juice added to perk up the flavors and provide a tang.”Then there’s the kali dal, or buttered black beans, which is made from sabat urad, according to Sahni: “This is the most exquisite of all dal preparations, completely different both in texture and flavoring. This is a Moghul classic and the best is served in Bukhara in Mumbai and at Moti Mahal in Delhi. Prepared correctly, it can take over five hours to cook on a very slow fire so that the beans can cook and expand without breaking.”Urad, known as ma ki dal, or mother’s dal is very popular in Punjab.  In fact, all sorts of dal find their way into Punjabi cuisine and dal chawal is the very epitome of comfort food, which can be eaten any time of the day or night.Sindhi cuisine also utilizes lentils in many of its vegetarian dishes, including a classic toovar dal preparation, Sindhi curry, which is made from chickpea flour, and the Sindhi saibhaji, a ratatouille of spinach, several other vegetables and channa dal.Gujarat, of course,  is the absolute treasure house of lentil cooking – no wonder dal bhaat is such a common expression. “I can say this unequivocally,” notes Madhur Jaffrey in her book Flavors of India, “If there is an haute cuisine for vegetarians – ancient, traditional foods with astounding flavors and textures, all based on sound nutritional principles – it can be found in the Indian state of Gujarat.”  She points out that whether it is khandavi, pasta rolls made out of cooked chick pea batter or handva, a cake made out of batter of pulses and vegetables, or the sev, or the diamonds of lentil flour known as dhokla, lentils play a big part in Gujarati cooking from appetizers to main course to dessert.One of the most versatile dal is channa dal, which can be mixed with vegetables, meats and grains and when ground into flour, it can be used to bind kebabs. Deep fried, channa and moong dal, can become tasty snacks. Soaked and ground,  form the basis for dahi vadas, kachoris and vadas. Made into a batter, they transform into crisp savories like gatti, papdi and papads, especially popular in Rajasthan. The creative cooks of Indian regions have also turned the mundane dal into rich desserts such as besan barfi, mung dal sheera and churma laddus.Dal is absolutely vital to the cooking of the South and is used in many auspicious occasions and ancestral rites. We asked Dr. Vasudha Naayanan, Professor of Religion at the University of Florida and an expert cook, to walk us through the dal traditions of South India. “No South Indian ritual is complete without a meal in which we cook dal,” she says. “However, the local custom and practice in some areas of the South is that toovar cannot be used for ancestral rites.  On the other hand, the main items like sambar for weddings have to be done with toovar dal. Obviously one cannot generalize across the communities; others may have different customs.”Moong dal is used in many happy functions, such as the making of pongal and also the soaked moong offering on Sri Ram Navami, the birthday of Rama. While moong dal is cooked also for death and ancestral rituals, toovar dal is used at birth rituals and for auspicious occasions in a number of ways. Unless one happens to be in mourning, toovar dal is served daily.“Initially, as soon as they serve you the vegetables, rice and ghee, the cook or the person who is serving will ladle a large spoon of cooked plain toovar dal, which just has salt and turmeric in it.“This initial serving of plain dal at the side is to signal the “normalcy” and the auspicious nature of the day. This simple plain dal is called ilai paruppu or leaf-dal, hreferring to the first symbolic serving of dal on the banana-leaf plate from which one eats.” The first main course, served on the white plain rice, is sambar. This is the dal which is in the consistency of a thick soup and is made with toovar dal, tamarind juices, vegetables, and spices.  She says, “One mixes this sambar with rice and eats it with vegetables. Today, of course, sambar is more famous as a side dish to idlis and dosais, but it is really the main course of a South Indian meal, mixed with white sticky rice.”Dals play such an important part on the South Indian table that even the second course in a standard meal is white rice, mixed with rasam (from the Sanskrit rasa). There are dozens of variety of rasam, each delectably different in flavor from the other. Rasam is understandably known as saaru or essence in Kannada and saarru amudu, the nectar of the essence in Tamil.  Yes, South Indians certainly take their dals very, very seriously!An interesting historical point is that it was rasam that was called Mulligatawny soup by the British and adapted by them. Mulligatawny is from the Tamil word Milagu Tanni or pepper water.“The very first solid food a baby is given is white rice, mixed soft with plain boiled toovar dal, with no spices,” says Narayan. “After the baby is a year old, we add a spoon of light, thin, rasam – the top clear part – to the rice and toovar dal to introduce the baby to normal cuisine. Rasam and rice is given when we are sick, this is the mildest food.  In traditional houses, there would be a light dinner and one would skip sambar and have a moong dal dish and rasam.”Dals are part of every meal from breakfast to dinner. Urad dal is used in the making of  idlis and dosais. A standard breakfast in Andhra Pradesh is Pesarattu, a dal dosa, and the South Indian Adai is a popular tiffin. Dals are also the magical ingredient in hundreds of chutneys called pacchadis in Andhra Pradesh and Podis (powder) with precise quantities of particular, dry roasted and ground. The “gun powder,” which can make you weep, is very popular in Andhra. Little wonder then that immigrants have carried their obsession for dal all over the world, be it Africa, Malaysia, Europe or the Caribbean. In the West Indies, the children of immigrants who left India 150 years ago still lovingly cook dal and have introduced their own creations: dal roti is a Trinidadian delicacy, which you will not find in India.The Gujaratis who settled in Africa many years ago ensured that lentils flourished in East and South Africa too, and today these are exported all over the world. Sahni points out, there are so many different kinds of legumes in the world and due to the composition of soil and local climate, even the same species of legume can taste quite different. Across the United States hundreds of Indian grocery stores stock a full variety of dal products, from spicy chevra mixes to dal kachoris to cooked dal fresh, frozen, canned and shelf-stabilized. Last year a poor harvest in India had dal lovers in a tizzy because shortages in the home market, prompted India to ban the export of dals. The prices in the overseas market skyrocketed and Indian immigrants found themselves paying double the price for dal. Luckily the shortage didn’t cause the near revolution that occurred in India some years ago, following a shortage of onions, another big Indian addiction!It may come as a surprise to many to learn that America actually exports lentils and legumes to India. Last year a hefty shipment of 700,000 tons of peas was sold to India. According to Peter Klaiber, Director of Marketing, USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council based in Moscow, Idaho, the largest trade with India is in peas, both yellow and green, which are used in dal preparations in the domestic market in India.“India grows more peas and more lentils and more chickpeas than any other country by far, but Indians eat more than they grow,” says Klaiber. “So they need to import some to make up for the shortfall, because, as you know,  people are eating dal every day.” He points out that India also buys from other countries, including Canada and Australia. Indeed in spite of being one of the largest dal growers in the world, India is also the largest importer in the world. Many of its premium dals are exported to fulfill the needs of the overseas Indian market.So India imports beans and lentils from Turkey, Canada and Nepal to make up for all that it’s sending out to expatriate sons and daughters who are trying to conjure up a taste of home on foreign shores.Dal is both comfort food and food for celebrations. It also has a strange, magical quality. A bubbling cauldron of dal never seems to run out, and you can open up your kitchen to those who may drop in suddenly. It is surely one of the most popular foods among Indians on college campuses in the United States, where a roomful of hungry foreign students, cooking up a pot, can get a taste of home and still not bust their budgets.So dal is probably the fuel which keeps India and Indians ticking. Whether you’re hungry, tired or depressed, a steaming bowl of dal will set you right.   Related Itemslast_img read more

80-Year-Old Bus Driver Found Guilty of Causing Two Deaths by Dangerous Driving in UK

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first_imgA UK court has found an 80-year-old bus driver of Indian origin guilty of causing the deaths of two people by his dangerous driving nearly three years ago.The court found Kailash Chander unfit to plead or stand trial at Birmingham Crown Court as he was diagnosed with dementia. Chander had been through suicidal thoughts, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and was very preoccupied by the crash, according to the BBC.On Oct. 1, 2015, Chander had smashed the double-decker bus into a Sainsbury’s supermarket in the city of Coventry, when he mistook the accelerator as brakes. A seven-year-old schoolboy, Rowan Fitzgerald, and a 76-year-old pedestrian, Dora Hancox, died in the crash. Fitzgerald was sitting at the front of the upper deck of the bus and succumbed of head injuries caused by the crash, while Hancox died after being hit by the bus and a falling lamppost.The court heard that Chander, who was 77 years old at the time of the crash, had been warned by the bus company for his “erratic” driving, which had resulted in four crashes in previous three years.A witness submitted before the court that Chander, a former town mayor of Leamington Spa, was even struggling to punch a ticket as his hands were shaking.The court can give a verdict for a supervision order for him in a scheduled hearing in November while the bus company Midland Red (South), which pleaded guilty for health and safety law breaches, will be sentenced on Sept.21. It may be subjected to a hefty amount of fine, as per the report.“You will obviously feel sympathy for the very real tragedy that has befallen Mrs. Hancox and her family and Rowan and his family. But in judging this case and in deciding whether the prosecution have proved the act of dangerous driving, you have to put emotion to one side. You are here to judge the evidence objectively and dispassionately,” the judge told the jury members before their verdict, according to PTI.Fitzgerald ‘s family said in a statement that no sentence would ever stop the hurt what they feel for his loss. The grieving family of the boy called for a change in the law to prevent old people from driving buses. Related ItemsBirminghamUnited Kingdomlast_img read more

People supreme, Naveen reminds MLAs

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first_imgOdisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Friday told State legislators that democratic dissent should not eclipse democratic decency under any circumstances.Addressing the inaugural session of a two-day orientation programme for legislators, Mr. Patnaik said that democratic dissent is “a right, however, while exercising this right, legislators must not forget democratic decency”.“The roots of our successful democracy lie in our people and their unflinching faith in democratic values,” added Mr. Patnaik.“Every elected representative must understand this: whatever position you may be in, the people are supreme. Elected representatives should keep the common people at the centre of all their initiatives,” said the CM. Stating that the primary function of the legislature is to make laws, Mr. Patnaik said an appetite for information and education on legislative procedures, and understanding of socio-economic issues and policies is beneficial.“All our Acts and policies are essentially directed towards the greater public good. Legislators should endeavour to bring the Acts and policies to the public domain so that the people can be partners in the process of change,” he added.‘Lead by example’Stating that the legislators must lead by example. Mr. Patnaik said: “Simplicity should be at the core of our public behaviour. Leading a simple life can help us stay connected to the people.”Odisha Assembly Speaker Surjya Narayan Patro presided over the inaugural session of the programme., which was organised by the Odisha Legislative Assembly in collaboration with the Lok Sabha Secretariat. Deputy Speaker Rajanikanta Singh, Parliamentary Affairs Minister Bikram Keshari Arukha, Leader of Opposition Pradipta Kumar Nayak and Government Chief Whip Pramila Mallick also attended the event.last_img read more

Amarinder for open access to more gurdwaras across border

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first_imgPunjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh on Tuesday said he would take up with Prime Minister Narendra Modi the issue of persuading Pakistan to grant Indian devotees open access to more historic gurdwaras across the border.Expressing his gratitude to Mr. Modi and Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan for helping realise the Sikh community’s dream of visiting the Kartarpur Gurdwara, Capt. Amarinder hoped this would be followed by more such gurdwaras in Pakistan, such as Panja Sahib and Nankana Sahib, being opened to Indian devotees.He said he would personally take up the matter with Mr. Modi and urge him to raise the issue with Mr. Khan.Capt. Amarinder acknowledged the support given by the Union government in making the historic celebrations a success and expressed happiness at the participation of people from different political parties, as a tribute to the first Sikh guru.President present President Ram Nath Kovind, who attended the celebrations, said Guru Nanak Dev tried to free people from caste and creed and ritualism by teaching them lessons of equality, brotherhood, kindness and morality. “True followers of Guru Nanak Dev Ji work for the welfare of all, live in harmony and do their job with diligence and honesty,” he said. Mr. Kovind paid obeisance at Gurdwara Ber Sahib and then went to the stage set up by the Punjab government for the celebrations. Later, he went to the other stage (pandal) set up by the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee.Two stagesHowever, the setting up of separate stages for the celebrations didn’t go down well with the pilgrims, many of whom felt that the Guru’s message of ‘oneness’ was unheeded by political parties.Forty-five-year old Baljinder Singh from Patiala, who had come to the holy town for the first time, said that he was peeved at the two stages. “They [SGPC and the State government] should have joined hands and set up only one stage. Guru Nanak Dev Ji’s idea and message of ‘oneness’ has been disregarded by them,” he said.“I’ll pay obeisance at the gurdwara and return. I’ll not go any of these stages,” he added.A group of youngsters from Jalalabad in Fazilka expressed similar sentiments. “How will they [political parties] preach the message of the Guru, when they seem to be involved in their advertising through there stages and events?” said 32-year-old Daljeet Singh.Seventy-five-year-old Darshan Singh from Amritsar said: “Such division is not good for humanity. The message of unification and integration should have been sent, instead an opposite message has been conveyed.”Guru Nanak Dev had spent 14 years of his early life in Sultanpur Lodhi.last_img read more

Vehicles of U.P. govt. agency that acquired land torched

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first_imgPlastic pipes and vehicles outside a State infrastructure agency godown here were set ablaze on Sunday, a day after farmers clashed with police demanding adequate compensation for their land that was acquired for an upcoming township by the agency. The incident took place around 11 a.m. outside the godown of the Uttar Pradesh State Industrial Development Authority (UPSIDA) which acquired the land for the Trans-Ganga City project near Kanpur, officials said. “Some anti-social elements had set fire to plastic pipes kept outside the godown. Apart from this, two vehicles were also set afire,” Additional District Magistrate Rakesh Singh said. “No farmer has so far claimed responsibility for Sunday’s act, which means that the work has been done by anti-social elements,” District Magistrate Devendra Kumar Pandey said. On Saturday, farmers demanding better compensation for their land clashed with the police when government officials visited the project site to clear the encroachment. Several farmers were injured as the police baton-charged them, used tear gas and water cannons. Many police personnel were also injured as the protesters targeted them with stones. Meanwhile, the Rashtriya Kisan Manch, a forum working for welfare of farmers, claimed that the growers were not indulging in violent protests and were only demanding adequate compensation for their land. “Nearly 30% of the farmers of the clash-hit area are yet to get compensation from the government,” RKM president Shekhar Dixit said on Sunday. The district magistrate, however, had said on Saturday that the farmers were adequately compensated.Priyanka tweetCongress general secretary Priyanka Gandhi Vadra shared a 22-second-long video of the clash on Twitter. “UP Chief Minister is making big speeches in Gorakhpur, but see the condition of his police. A farmer in Unnao is lying semi-conscious after being beaten by laathi (stick). He is still being beaten up. There should be some shame. A person who grows grains for you is subjected to such cruelty,” she tweeted.last_img read more

Fernandez enjoys coaching players from other schools in NCAA All-Star

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first_imgCatriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Fernandez was finally able to get one against Robinson, as the Saints team, made up of stars from San Beda, Letran, San Sebastian, Perpetual, and St. Benilde, escaped the late rally from the Heroes crew, comprised of standouts from Lyceum, JRU, EAC, Arellano, and Mapua.The Red Lion mentor  the rare chance to have players like Rey Nambatac, Bong Quinto, and eventual All-Star MVP Prince Eze in his team.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“They’re really good. You know them when you’re facing against them, but once you coach them, you can really see their basketball IQ,” he said.Fernandez was also caught by surprise with how the unheralded players from the Golden Stags and the Blazers worked hard in practice. Coach Boyet Fernandez. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netSan Beda coach Boyet Fernandez isn’t putting too much thought his victory over Topex Robinson when his Saints prevailed over the Heroes, 84-80, in the 2017 NCAA All-Star Game on Friday.“It’s a different situation. Even though Topex is coaching the other team, it’s still an All-Star game and we’re just enjoying today’s game. It’s for the fans and the students of the member schools of the NCAA,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ View comments UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “I’m surprised of the three San Sebastian players. They can play and they just play. The same goes with St. Benilde. They really enjoyed their time even if they came from different schools,” he said, praising the attitude of San Sebastian’s Ian Valdez, Kevin Baytan, and Alvin Baetiong, as well as St. Benilde’s JJ Domingo, Edward Dixon, and Gerard Castor.With the midseason festivities now done with, Fernandez’ focus is back in the second round as San Beda returns to action against St. Benilde.“We know the second round will come on Tuesday. We’re enjoying this now and tomorrow, we’ll already focus on the second round,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT PBA: Globalport stuns TNT SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes PLAY LIST 01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Read Next LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Folayang preparing for Nguyen’s speed

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first_imgHe has already tweaked his training for his second bout this year, anticipating Nguyen’s quick attacks and counters.Nguyen, meanwhile, said that weight doesn’t pose any problems for him knowing he has bigger things worry about against Folayang.“Surprisingly, I’m still the weight I usually compete during fight camp. I don’t have problems when it comes to that,” said Nguyen.“I know Eduard is going to be strong. I still have my speed. But I know it’s going to be a chess game.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lyceum one win away from elims sweep, annihilates JRU Read Next The Makati skyline provides the perfect backdrop for Eduard Folayang and Martin Nguyen’s first face off. Photo by Celest Flores-ColinaFilipino ONE champion Eduard Folayang knows the caliber of opponent he’s up against.Folayang is anticipating a speedier fighter in Martin Nguyen, also the ONE featherweight champion, in his second title defense of his lightweight title on November 10 at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Alvarez ready to take risk vs Folayang, looks to end clash by ‘knockout or submission’ PLAY LIST 02:18Alvarez ready to take risk vs Folayang, looks to end clash by ‘knockout or submission’02:03MMA legends gather in Tokyo for historic ONE: New Era fight week00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  “Ev Ting is a natural lightweight. Mark is a natural featherweight. So I expect that he will be faster and quicker than Ev Ting. It will be a good match up,” said Folayang on Tuesday during their face off in Makati.The Baguio native said he was impressed with how Nguyen took down Marat Gafurov to earn his world title in Macao just last August months after he defeated Ting in a dominant performance via unanimous decision.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAgainst his upcoming Vietnamese-Australian foe, who is moving up weight for their cross-divisional fight, Folayang wants to prove that the lightweight is his territory.“I want to teach him that the lightweight division,” said Folayang, who was a high school teacher in Mountain Province before joining Team Lakay. “As a champion, I want my division to be respected so I will do my best to defend the title.” Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasacenter_img BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight MOST READ LATEST STORIES Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View comments LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversarylast_img read more

Archers slay Maroons

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first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Eager to settle an old score, La Salle came out tenacious early to deal University of the Philippines its worst beating of UAAP Season 80.Ben Mbala fired 27 points and grabbed 14 rebounds as the Green Archers also gave coach Aldin Ayo a fitting birthday present with an 85-62 demolition of the Fighting Maroons on Sunday to solidify their hold of second spot at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Facing one of the two teams that beat them in the past two seasons, the Archers zoomed to an early double-digit lead before coasting in the second half to raise their record to 6-2.Mbala made life difficult on UP top gun Paul Desiderio, who was held to just seven points on 2-of-13 shooting after scoring 30 points in the 98-87 win in the first round last Sept. 23.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We wanted this win so bad,” said La Salle guard Kib Montalbo, who also ended his shooting slump with 12 points.“We have lost to them four times this year, including tune-up games and its also coach’s (Ayo) birthday.” LATEST STORIEScenter_img 13 PH kids earn FC Barcelona training slots Mbala added: “We were eager, we cannot lose to the same team, which probably means that maybe we got to think about what we’re doing wrong.”Earlier, Far Eastern U inflicted more misery on winless University of Santo Tomas, while tightening its grip on fourth spot following an emphatic 96-70 victory. Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:38Duterte orders probe on radio broadcaster slay in Dumaguete02:11’Not just basketball’: Circumcisions, pageants at Philippine courts01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View commentslast_img read more

Lady Warriors, Jet spikers dispute semis slot

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first_imgMyla Pablo and Kai Nepomuceno took care of the scoring in Pocari’s 25-23, 25-14, 25-19 rout of Adamson on Sunday, scoring 17 and 14 points, respectively.But the Lady Warriors’ firepower will be put to test by the scrappy Air Force crew, including Iari Yongco, Joy Cases and Mae Pantino. —MARC ANTHONY REYESSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress But that’s also what Air Force, which shares second spot with Pocari at 4-1, has in mind.The Jet Spikers are riding on a five-set triumph over the Power Smashers on Sunday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBaliPure also hopes to stay in contention when it takes on Adamson-Akari in the other match at 4 p.m.The Water Defenders suffered a stinging five-set defeat at the hands of streaking Perlas-BanKo in a match that saw last conference’s runners-up take the first two sets. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Phoenix, NLEX shoot for No. 3 LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ An outright semifinal stint is at stake when defending champion Pocari Sweat and Air Force clash Wednesday in the Premier Volleyball League Open Conference at 6:30 p.m. Filoil Flying V Centre.Pocari is coming off a win against Adamson-Akari over the weekend and is bent on clinching a spot in the semifinals along with early qualifier and unbeaten league-leader Creamline.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet View comments El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ MOST READ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plantlast_img read more