Cultures clashing the Brazilian Film TV Festival Of Toronto and CineIran Festival

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first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Tonight (Friday October 14) at 7 pm, Marlom Meirelles’s short Button Eyes and Claudio Assis’s feature Big Jet are paired in a program devoted to the northeast region of Pernambuco, a part of the country that’s rarely captured on-screen but pretty spectacular to look at. And on Sunday (October 16) at 5 pm, a selection of six shorts offers a sense of emerging Brazilian cinema – including Gui Campos’s tender Rosinha and Diego Freitas’s clever Salt. Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement The fall micro-fest season can get a little crowded, but this is ridiculous: there are no fewer than four film festivals happening this very weekend.Competing with the expansive Reelworld and Toronto After Dark for your attention are two smaller fests, each with a much more specific cultural focus. But if you share that focus, they’re the only game in town.First, there’s the Brazilian Film & TV Festival Of Toronto, or BRAFFTV. Marking its 10th edition at the Carlton Cinemas, the festival – which opened last night – delivers exactly what it promises on the tin, importing recent Brazilian cinema and television for a Canadian audience. And all screenings are free. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Second Jen and the rise of actorwritten TV

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first_imgTelevision might be moving past the idea that actors act and writers write. Second Jen, a new comedy series premiering on City TV on Oct. 27, is the story of two young Asian-Canadian women who move into an apartment together, and the two leads, Amanda Joy and Samantha Wan, are also the creators of the show. Both had been working actors before they teamed up to make and sell the pilot for Second Jen, and they’re not the only actors who are taking more control over their careers by writing their own material. “In the industry you’re treated differently if you’re an actor, or you’re an actor and creator,” says Amanda Joy. “So it can create different relationships with people in the industry, which can facilitate your career in different ways.”One reason we’re seeing more actors write scripts for themselves is that it’s easier than it used to be to film those scripts. Joy and Wan produced the pilot for Second Jen themselves, and then began the process of selling it to production companies and networks. While self-produced pilots have sometimes resulted in shows, like South Park, it used to be much harder and more expensive to produce them. Today, in the era of web series made with relatively cheap technology, actors find it easier to get the resources to put themselves on film.“I think it would have been impossible for all but a very few to create a spec pilot or proof of concept just 10 years ago,” Joy says. “When my sister went to film school, she was shooting everything on film, and she’s not much older than me. Today people are able to prove they can make things, that their show has legs, in a way that they couldn’t have done by handing in a 22-page script, which goes on a stack with other 22-page scripts.” Wan adds that the creation of Second Jen “was just us thinking, ‘We want to make a TV show. How do people get a TV show? They make pilots.’ So we funded our own 22-minute short.” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

ICYMI – WINNERS THE 15th ANNUAL ACTRA AWARDS IN TORONTO

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first_imgACTRA Toronto is proud to announce the winners of its 15th Annual ACTRA Awards in Toronto.Outstanding Performance – FemaleJean Yoon (Umma) Kim’s Convenience, “Gay Discount” (Thunderbird Films)Outstanding Performance – MaleJoey Klein (Bobby) We’re Still Together (Achromatic Media) LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Outstanding Performance – VoiceLinda Kash (Gina Falcone) Fugget About It, “Vagina’s Got Talent” (9 Story Media Group)The members’ choice Series Ensemble Award went to Kim’s Convenience.Joel Keller presented ACTRA Toronto’s 2017 Award of Excellence to Yannick Bisson.The ACTRA Toronto Stunt Award was presented posthumously to Joel Harris. His widow, stunt performer Alicia Turner, accepted.The newly-elected President of ACTRA Toronto Theresa Tova said, “Canada has been reflected by ACTRA’s professional performers for fully half of Canada’s 150-year history. Linda Kash, Joey Klein, Jean Yoon, Yannick Bisson, Joel Harris and Kim’s Convenience, and all the nominees, personify the extraordinary talent of our professional acting community.”The 15th Annual ACTRA Awards in Toronto were presented at a live show and gala tonight at The Carlu. The show was hosted by Aurora Browne, Carolyn Taylor and Jennifer Whalen from the Baroness Von Sketch troupe with live music by the 11-piece Wintergarten Orchestra with singer and actor Ted Atherton. The evening sported a theme to honour Canada’s sesquicentennial celebrations.The 15th Annual ACTRA Awards in Toronto were sponsored by: DIAMOND: Actra Fraternal Benefit Society, ACTRA National, ACTRA Performers’ Rights Society, ACTRA Recording Artists’ Collecting Society. PLATINUM: Bell Media, SAG-AFTRA. GOLD: CBC, CMPA, Deluxe, IATSE 873, Rhombus Media, Shaftesbury, United Steelworkers. POST-SHOW RECEPTION: eOne. SILVER: Cavalluzzo, Directors Guild of Canada (Ontario), RBC Royal Bank. BRONZE: Addenda Capital, Creative Arts Savings & Credit Union, Canada Film Capital and Entertainment Partners Canada, Don Carmody Productions, Frantic Films, Grant Thornton, HUB International, New Real Films, Serendipity Point Films, Take 5 Productions, Thunderbird Entertainment, TriBro Studios, Universal Promotions, Writers Guild of Canada.ACTRA Toronto is the largest organization within ACTRA, representing more than 15,000 of Canada’s 23,000 professional performers working in recorded media in Canada. As an advocate for Canadian culture since 1943, ACTRA is a member-driven union that continues to secure rights and respect for the work of professional performers. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

This years Hot Docs festival flaunts neargender parity

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first_img“Fair and balanced.” That might be a term more closely associated with cable stalwart Fox News (in either a sincere or cynical fashion) – but it can also be applied to this year’s Hot Docs film festival, with organizers touting near-gender parity among 2017’s selections.Of the 230 titles to play this year’s edition of the documentary extravaganza, almost 48 per cent of the programming will be courtesy of female filmmakers. They include Lana Slezic, whose debut doc Bee Nation will act as the festival’s opening night film. Chronicling a group of students in Saskatchewan who compete in the province’s first First Nations Spelling Bee, Slezic’s work promises to resonate with current headlines – which makes it par for the course with Hot Docs’ 2017 lineup, a fact that the festival is eager to trumpet.“The Hot Docs programming team has scoured the globe to bring the finest documentaries to Toronto audiences for a festival-high of 58 countries,” said Shane Smith, director of programming for the festival, in a statement. “As our world shifts in startling new ways, Hot Docs is committed to showcasing those films that tackle topics of global importance: from environmental issues and human rights, to international conflict.” Advertisement On that latter note, this year’s festival offers coverage in spades across all 13 of its programs. The devastating war in Syria, for instance, will be highlighted by such films as 69 Minutes of 86 Days, which follows a three-year-old Syrian refugee and her family as they struggle to make their way through Europe; Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS, by noted documentarian Sebastian Junger; A Memory in Khaki, which promises a more poetic take on the conflict; and City of Ghosts, Matthew Heineman’s look at reporters covering a country under siege, which screened to great acclaim at Sundance earlier this winter. (All these films will screen under the “Syria 360°” label.) Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

QUEBECOR MAKES 100000 DONATION TO MAISON RENÉLÉVESQUE

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first_img“In addition to his vitally important contribution to the development of modern Québec, René Lévesque played a prominent role as a Journal de Montréal columnist from 1970 to 1976,” noted Pierre Karl Péladeau, President and CEO of Quebecor. “It was therefore natural for us to support the Fondation de la Maison René-Lévesque and pay tribute to this man, an exemplar of self-affirmation who was proud of his language and his roots. We hope that Espace René-Lévesque will long inspire future generations.”Quebecor has been supporting the Fondation René-Lévesque for more than 10 years. Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twittercenter_img Advertisement Facebook About QuebecorQuebecor, a Canadian leader in telecommunications, entertainment, news media and culture, is one of the best-performing integrated communications companies in the industry. Driven by their determination to deliver the best possible customer experience, all of Quebecor’s subsidiaries and brands are differentiated by their high-quality, multiplatform, convergent products and services.Québec-based Quebecor (TSX: QBR.A, QBR.B) employs more than 10,000 people in Canada.A family business founded in 1950, Quebecor is strongly committed to the community. Every year, it actively supports more than 400 organizations in the vital fields of culture, health, education, the environment and entrepreneurship.Visit our website: www.quebecor.comFollow us on Twitter: twitter.com/Quebecor MONTRÉAL, June 26, 2018 – In keeping with its commitment to protecting and presenting Québec’s historical heritage, Quebecor today announced a major $100,000 donation to the Fondation de la Maison René-Lévesque, an organization dedicated to supporting the Espace René-Lévesque site in René Lévesque’s home town of New Carlisle, Québec. Starting today, visitors to the facility can tour a pavilion and follow an outdoor trail celebrating René Lévesque’s life, his political legacy and his imprint on Québec’s history.last_img read more

ENTRIES NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE 2018 CAJ AWARDS PROGRAM

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first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Entries now being accepted for the 2018 CAJ Awards program (CNW Group/Canadian Association of Journalists) You can also go directly to the submission site by clicking here.Members always get the best rates and those considering an entry are encouraged to become a CAJ member as part of entering the awards. For example, CAJ members eligible to submit an individual entry into the Community Media or Community Broadcast categories will have their entry fee waived.“The past calendar year has seen Canadian journalists continue to respond to newsroom closures cutbacks and attrition in the best way they know how – by continuing to produce the kind of journalism that affects change, changes opinions and makes our communities better places to live,” said CAJ president Karyn Pugliese. “The CAJ Awards is one of the most rewarding programs offered by our association and we encourage all those journalists who did good work in 2018 to enter.”The CAJ Awards finalists will be announced by the mid- to end of March 2019, with the winners announced at the 2019 CAJ Conference scheduled for May 3-5, 2019 in Winnipeg.The CAJ is Canada’s largest national professional organization for journalists from all media, representing members across the country. The CAJ’s primary roles are to provide public-interest advocacy and high-quality professional development for its members.General awards questions can always be submitted to awards@caj.ca Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment OTTAWA, Dec. 11, 2018 – The Canadian Association of Journalists is pleased to announce entries are now being accepted for the 2018 CAJ Awards program, featuring Canada’s top investigative journalism award, the Don McGillivray Award.The deadline for entries is Jan. 14, 2019.Full information on the 2018 CAJ Awards is now posted on the Awards section of our website. Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Conservatives unveil belttightening federal budget with few changes

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first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–The Conservative government unveiled a carbon-copy federal budget Monday containing modest investments to First Nations policing, reserve infrastructure and for a highway in the Northwest Territories.The budget was essentially a replay of the previous budget unveiled on March 22 which was rejected by the opposition parties and failed to see the light of day after the triggering of the last election which led to a Conservative majority government.The two main additions in this incarnation of the budget was the $2.2 billion harmonized sales tax agreement with Quebec and the beginning of the phase out of the per-vote subsidy for political parties.The undercurrent of the budget remains belt tightening, with the government projecting a return to a balanced budget by 2014-2015.The government is projecting a deficit of $32 billion for 2011-2012. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said the government planned to find about $4 billion in savings a year.The main commitments on the Aboriginal affairs file in this latest version of the 2011 budget were also highlighted in the Speech from the Throne including completion of a highway in the Northwest Territories, investments in clean energy technology, expanding adult education and supporting an Indian Affairs initiative to help bands develop and enact laws governing their reserve lands.The government is committing $150 million to finish the final leg of the Dempster Highway to link Inuvik, NT., with Tuktoyaktuk, NT., according to the 2011 budget.The budget also set aside $8 million to continue investments in clean energy technology to power remote First Nation and northern communities that currently rely on non-renewable energy, like diesel powered generators, to provide electricity.The government has committed to invest about $22 million over the next two years to upgrade fuel tanks for these power plants that supply electricity to “off-grid” First Nations communities.The government will also put $30 million over the next two years into the First Nations Policing Program to continue funding on-reserve First Nations police forces.The First Nations Land Management program, which helps First Nations communities develop and enact laws governing reserve land use, will also get about $20 million in reallocated funds, according to the 2011 budget.Basic adult education is also getting about $9 million over two years.Nunavut’s justice system will get about $4.2 million to hire new judges and prosecutors.The budget also invests $68 million to clean up federal contaminated sites over the next two years, including the Giant and Faro mines in Northern Canada.last_img read more

Court tosses 60s scoop lawsuit

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first_imgAPTN National NewsFor most, the New Year is a time of resolutions and new beginnings.But for 60s scoop survivors in Ontario, they’re being forced to walk down a path they’ve been down before.APTN National News reporter Donna Smith has this story.last_img

Iqaluit rent for 2 bedroom apartment 2200

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first_imgAPTN National NewsResidents in Canada’s two most northern cities pay the highest rent rates in Canada.That’s from a new report from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.So just how much are people there paying?APTN National News reporter Curtis Mandeville went to find out.last_img

Harper planning on ducking out early during meeting with FN leaders Chiefs

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first_img(Prime Minister Stephen Harper and AFN National Chief Shawn Atleo inside the prime minister’s Parliament Hill office on Dec. 1 APTN/Photo)By Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsPrime Minister Stephen Harper is expected to leave by lunch time during next Tuesday’s meeting with hundreds of First Nations leaders in Ottawa, according to chiefs in Ontario and British Columbia.In interviews with APTN National News, chiefs said they have been notified that Harper may not be attending any of the post-ceremony meetings where First Nations leaders are expected to voice their concerns and priorities for changing the often desperate state of Indigenous communities across the country.Chiefs, however, said details of the gathering seem to be changing almost every hour.Harper will be present for the opening ceremonies and speeches, one of which he will deliver.Chiefs have been told that the prime minister may have to leave early to either prepare or take a flight to the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland, which begins Wednesday.Harper called next Tuesday’s gathering with First Nations leaders “historic” when he announced the event in December as political fallout from the Attawapiskat housing crisis was reaching its climax.“It is something I hope to be historic,” said Harper, who announced the event in his Parliament Hill office with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo sitting next to him.Several cabinet ministers, including Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver, Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Peter Penashue and Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, are expected to attend. But the chance to have Harper hear directly from and respond to First Nations chiefs was the centerpiece of the event.The prime minister was personally urged Monday in a telephone conversation with Atleo to “maximize his time” with First Nations leaders on Tuesday, APTN National News has learned.Some chiefs had also suggested the prime minister meet with some First Nations leaders separately Monday evening to hear their issues, but the Prime Minister’s Office has been reluctant to agree fearing it could turn into a “media circus” once word got out, according to a source with knowledge of the file.The PMO will only say that Harper’s itinerary would be set 24 hours in advance of the meeting.“The Prime Minister looks forward to attending next week’s gathering and addressing and engaging with Chiefs from First Nations across Canada,” said a statement from the PMO. “The government, which will also be represented at the gathering by several ministers and high-level officials, welcomes the opportunity for a constructive dialogue with First Nations and to identify the ways we can make progress on key issues like economic development, education, and accountability.”Harper’s expected departure midway through the Crown-First Nations gathering has left some First Nation leaders wondering about the point of the meeting.“We are deeply disappointed to hear the prime minister will be ducking out the back door within a couple of hours after this session begins,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. “I think in many ways it reflects his dismissive attitude towards the Aboriginal people in this country.”Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Patrick Madahbee said he hoped that Harper would find the time to hear directly from chiefs either on Tuesday, or at an eventual meeting between First Nations leaders, premiers and the prime minister.Madahbee said chiefs were hoping that Harper and his cabinet ministers would agree to a time-table that would see concrete changes within six to 18 months.“We need to get some traction on issues,” said Madahbee, whose organization represents 39 Ontario First Nations. “There is a young generation of people who are getting more and more impatient, that want to get results and actions. We have been telling the government to deal with the leadership or deal with what could get out of hand.”Madahbee said the preparation for the meeting has been “11th hour” and “on the fly” with uncertainty even surrounding how many actual chiefs will be in the room at Ottawa’s old city hall building for the actual meetings, or in an overflow room at the Chateau Laurier blocks away.“It is kind of unfortunate the planning process with this government,” he said.About 400 chiefs are expected to descend on Ottawa Tuesday and the AFN says they hope to get at least 200 chiefs in for the actual meetings, while the rest would watch it on video screens.There has also been disappointment among some chiefs over Harper’s plan to deliver a speech focused on his government’s commitments and plans, said Phillip.Phillip said many chiefs were hoping Harper would stay and listen to their concerns, and then respond to what he heard at the end of the gathering.“The idea was that at the end of the day, there would be an opportunity to reflect on what was said and what his government heard. That would be the high point of this historic dialogue with the prime minister,” said Phillip. “Now we find out that it is not going to happen.”Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Otsi Simon said he was going to take a wait and see approach to the meeting, but he hoped chiefs would find a way to stick together to force the government’s hand with Harper present or not.“We know it is going to be a challenge to deal with the Harper government. We are not sure if the chiefs will stick together,” he said. “We will probably see cracks again within the ranks of the chiefs…We are hoping the chiefs are going to see the urgency of unifying under one position and stick to that, regardless of what happens.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Hundreds of chiefs cast vote for national chief

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first_img(Chiefs cast ballots in Toronto for next national chief of Assembly of First Nations APTN/Photo)By Jorge Barrera and Tim FontaineAPTN National NewsTORONTO–Hundreds of First Nations chiefs began voting Wednesday morning for one of eight candidates vying to lead the country’s most influential organization for the next three years.The race for national chief of the Assembly of First Nations has featured the largest fields in its history, including four women who have ignited widespread support among the grassroots.It’s only the chiefs, however, who are allowed to cast their ballots for the candidates which include Ellen Gabriel, a Mohawk from Kanesatake, who rose to prominence during the Oka crisis, Joan Jack, an Ojibway lawyer from the Berens River First Nation and former Treaty 3 grand chief Diane Kelly, a lawyer from Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation, and Pam Palmater, a Mi’kmaq lawyer and professor at Ryerson University.The field also includes incumbent National Chief Shawn Atleo, George Stanley, Alberta AFN regional chief from the Cree First Nation of Frog Lake, Bill Erasmus, Dene Nation chief from the Northwest Territories and Terrance Nelson, the five-time former chief of Roseau River.According to the AFN, 515 chiefs and proxies (individuals casting votes for an absent chief) were registered to attend the Toronto gathering where the voting is being held.Voting began at about 9 a.m. and the results of the first ballot are expected after 12 p.m.Serpent River First Nation Chief Isadore Day said he was voting according to the will of the majority of his community which he said backed Palmater. Day, whose community is in Ontario, said he polled his residents using Twitter, Facebook, email and over the telephone.“Our members have seen (Palmater) as outspoken against what isn’t right,” said Day, in a statement. “They have not seen that level of resistance and outcry (from incumbent national chief Shawn Atleo).”Scia’new First Nation Chief Henry Chipps said, while standing in line waiting to vote, that he was backing Atleo who he felt was the best candidate up to the job. Chipps’ community is based in British Columbia.Tyendinaga Mohawk Chief Donald Maracle said he would be voting for Gabriel in the first ballot and Atleo in the second ballot.  Maracle, whose community is in Ontario, said he was pleased with the First Nations-Crown gathering held in Ottawa this past January that saw chiefs meet Prime Minister Stephen Harper.“I think it was a beginning. Hopefully there will be more of those,” said Maracle.Beausoleil First Nation Chief Roland Monague says he sees no consensus among Ontario leaders, but he’s decided to back Atleo.“I want someone who has already been to these communities and who knows our issues,” he said. “Better to go with someone who has already been there than to start all over again.”Other chiefs, however, were keeping their choices close to their chests.Chief Ray Sydney, from Kwanlin Dun First Nation in the Yukon, said he had two candidates in mind, but he wouldn’t reveal who they were. Sydney said he was looking for “integrity” in the candidates.Timiskaming Chief Terence McBride said he would decide who to vote for once he got into the voting booth.“They are all good candidates. They have a lot to bring to the table I suppose,” said McBride. “I guess the best one is going to win.”Atleo is expected to emerge in the lead following the first round of balloting, according to chiefs and observers surveyed by APTN National News. Opinions, however, vary wildly on the order of the rest of the field.Given that Atleo appears to have a lock on the large British Columbia voting block which could represent up to about 200 votes, some Ontario chiefs have spotted an opportunity to play kingmaker.Treaty 3 and Treaty 9 northern Ontario chiefs are considering backing Kelly as a block and holding their position on the premise that Atleo will need their support to take him over the top and strike a deal with them.Treaty 3 chiefs can bring about 28 votes to the table and Treaty 9 represents about 49 votes.Some northern Manitoba chiefs will also be voting strategically, supporting one candidate in the first round of voting and incumbent Shawn Atleo in any subsequent ballots.jbarrera@aptn.catfontaine@aptn.calast_img read more

New Brunswick student missing since Nov 25

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe search for Christopher Metallic in New Brunswick continues as the student hasn’t been seen since November 25.Metallic, 20, was last seen leaving a party in Sackville where he was attended university.The Mounties, search and rescue teams have scoured the area using helicopters, police dogs and divers.The family still holds out hope the Mi’Kmaq man will be found safe and they’ve now paid for cadaver dogs to join the search.last_img

Bostons Mikmaq speak to APTN in bombing aftermath

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first_imgAPTN National NewsBoston residents are still coming to terms with the terror attack two weeks ago.A number of the city’s residents are Mi’kmaq. In fact, more than 2,000 have moved south from Canada and call Boston home.APTN’s Tim Fontaine caught up with the community to find out how they’re coping.last_img

Families of missing murdered Indigenous women must be part of roundtable AFN

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first_imgClarification – After publishing this story representative from the AFN wrote to APTN to clarify their position.They said they understand the resolution to be a step toward a public inquiry and noted the following:  “AFN resolutions 02-2011, 01-2012 and 04-2013 specifically call for a national inquiry and it is a focus of the AFN’s National Action Plan to End Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls. Further, the resolution that mandated to work towards the roundtable (04-2014) specifically states it is a step towards an inquiry. These resolutions and the Action Plan are all publicly available and on the AFN website as are many public statements calling for a national inquiry. The AFN has been and will continue to be very vocal in its calls and action towards a national public commission of inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, as reiterated in the AFN’s Opening Remarks at this Special Chiefs Assembly.”APTN National NewsWINNIPEG – Rinelle Harper stood on the podium before the chiefs pleading to them to call for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women on the first day of the Assembly of First Nations special assembly earlier this week.It was one of the first public statements by the 16-year-old since she was sexually assaulted, viciously beaten and left for dead by a Winnipeg river last month.“I ask that everyone here remembers a few simple words – love, kindness, respect and forgiveness,” Rinelle told the crowd as her parents and older sister stood by her. “As a survivor, I respectfully challenge you all to call for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.”Chiefs from across Canada backed a roundtable voting unanimously in favour of two resolutions aimed at including women and families in the debate.One called for the inclusion of relatives of missing and murdered Indigenouswomen while the other wants the federal government to formally announce its participation in the roundtable and provide resources for Native women’s councils to take part.Chief Cathy Merrick of Manitoba’s Cross Lake First Nation burst into tears when her resolution on families of missing and murdered Indigenous women was passed Thursday. There are no resources to support mourning families or help them participate in the roundtable expected in February, she said.“Families should be given that support. When they go out looking for their loved ones, they have no support,” she said. “It’s 2014. We should be able to support them. We have to do something.”An RCMP report released earlier this year put the total of missing and murdered women at 1,181. Indigenous women make up 4.3 per cent of the Canadian population, but they account for 16 per cent of female homicides.Although the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women has been a key focus of the three-day assembly meeting, no one moved a formal resolution demanding the federal government call a national inquiry. Instead, the focus was aimed at empowering and including those on the front lines of the issue.Ghislain Picard, the assembly’s interim leader who lost his bid to become national chief Wednesday, raised the possibility of First Nations holding their own inquiry given Ottawa’s steadfast refusal to call one.“Every other day, there is a case being reported … about a missing person in this country,” Picard told the chiefs. “We need to act on it quickly rather than having a government remaining indifferent on the issue.”Chief Fawn Wapioke, of Iskatewizaagegan First Nation in Ontario, said an inquiry isn’t the only way to explore the issue. Wapioke brought forward the resolution calling for adequate support allowing women’s councils to drive the discussion at the roundtable.Women need to lead the discussion into missing and murdered Indigenous women, she said. That conversation can happen at a gathering of neighbours or a national roundtable meeting, Wapioke said.“We can’t have that paternalistic approach where somebody else tells us what’s good to us,” Wapioke said. “It needs to be facilitated and led by the women.“We’re all impacted. We’re all affected by what has happened and what’s been happening. That’s our future.”The Conservative government has repeatedly rejected calls for an inquiry, while the NDP and Liberals have promised to call one if either forms government after the next election.Perry Bellegarde, who was elected national chief, said Tuesday he would continue to fight for a national inquiry to examine all the factors that contribute to missing and murdered Indigneous women.“It’s homelessness. It’s poverty. It’s all those things we need to address,” he told delegates. “I’m going to push hard for that.”It’s not immediately clear if he was one of the chiefs who voted for a roundtable.Grand Chief David Harper, who represents Manitoba northern First Nations and is related to Rinelle, said Tuesday the teen is coming to grips with what she now represents to so many. At first, Harper said, the teen was reluctant to speak, but “now she is starting to understand why she has to speak out.”Elders have told Rinelle that she has been given “a gift,” he said.“A gift for those who cannot speak for themselves, those who have passed on,” Harper said. “You’re the voice for them.“This is why she is doing what she has to do now. Even though she didn’t want it, it is given to her.”– with files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Indigenous Affairs having second thoughts about not counting fires on reserve

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first_imgDennis WardAPTN National NewsFire has claimed hundreds of lives on reserves across the country.The causes can be attributed to substandard housing, overcrowded conditions or any number of problems that plague some First Nation communities.In 2010 the federal government stopped keeping track about the number of people who die in those fires.Now, there seems to be a change of heart.dward@aptn.calast_img

Families in Whitehorse share painful stories as inquiry tries to figure out

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first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN National NewsDiane Lilley can’t remember whether it was the right hand or the left hand that police used to identify her sister.Tina Washpan’s body was discovered along the Highway of Tears 20 years after her murder.Lilley said she will always remember the feeling of sitting by the telephone waiting for answers.“Even today it is quite hurtful to think back to my sister when she went missing and was found,” Lilley told APTN. “But I’m here to support the families and to keep my sister Tina’s memories alive.”DIane Lilly in Whitehorse. Photo: Charlotte Morritt-Jacobs/APTNLilley is now working to help other families in the north, by sharing her story at the first national inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls regional advisory meetings in Whitehorse in the traditional territory of the Kwanlin Dün and Ta’an Kwach’an.The meetings in Whitehorse began on Tuesday with a welcoming sacred fire ceremony that drew around 100 people and meetings on Wednesday and Thursday dedicated to families and community organizations.Fifty family members of Indigenous women and girls who have gone, missing, been murdered or experienced violence who met with Chief Commissioner Marion Buller, Commissioner Marilyn Poitras, researchers and members of the commission’s legal team to discuss their legal options and how they can participate in the national inquiry.Community organizations such as the Aboriginal Women’s Circle and the Yukon Women’s Directorate were also on hand to inform the commission on the practices and protocols of the north and how they could best conduct the inquiry in the Yukon based on area-specific systemic issues.Tiar Wilson, communications advisor with the inquiry told APTN that Whitehorse was chosen as the starting location for the regional meetings because of the the Territorial government and the Women’s Council’s strong pitch and advocacy on the issue.The regional meetings are part of the terms of reference in preparation for truth-finding gathering also known as a hearing, something Butler said she is happy with.“Holding these preliminary, regional meetings is the right thing; that’s the Indigenous thing,” said Wilson. “To consult with people, to understand their protocols, their rules of proper conduct, to understand their languages and their issues.”Aimée Craft, director of research with the inquiry, said that each regional meeting will help inform the commission on how the process should unfold in this particular region.Inquiry lawyer Gina Gill in Whitehorse. Photo: Charlotte Morritt-Jacobs/APTNThe truth-finding gatherings, an Indigenized term taken on by the commission in place of the more colonial and legal term “hearings” are where information and stories will be recorded.Those will begin in Whitehorse on May 29.On Friday, the commission announced that it is postponing future truth-finding gatherings until further notice and it’s not clear on whether that will delay the start of the official inquiry.Poitras said that the number of missing and murdered Indigenous women collected by the commission has grown since the commission arrived in Whitehorse.“So far, the commission has more than 250 names of people registered to take part in the National Inquiry,” she said.For Gina Gill, who has numerous family members reported as missing and murdered the meetings have been helpful to both her and her daughters.“It’s been an amazing experience I’ve heard from a lot of women including myself,” she said. “It is a very healthy environment. It’s professional and very warm and that’s exactly what the women need to carry on.”Gill’s sentiments on the Inquiry is not shared by all.The inquiry has been criticized by some families for confusion over registration.According to the commission, the national inquiry is committed to taking a voluntary approach when it comes to collecting registerees.“We are relying on what we call ‘families of the heart’ to come forward,” said Karen Snowshoe, a lawyer with the commission.Poitras told APTN that the term “families of the heart” were adopted by the commission after they were approached by an individual in Vancouver who suggested the commission change the term from family to ‘families of the heart’ to include individuals outside of the legal definition of immediate family who wish to participate.Commissioners told the media that testimonies can be given in public or private, spoken, written and or through artistic expression.The national inquiry will also schedule a set of hearings for institutions, such as governments, the RCMP, coroner services and child welfare agencies.The commission will then hear from experts such as members of the LGBTQ2S community, elders, youth and experts in aboriginal law.In a statement issued immediately following this week’s meetings, the inquiry announced that they would be postponing upcoming regional advisory meetings, citing the need for more time to reorganize future meetings.At this time there is no set date for the next set of regional advisory meetings.cmorrittjacobs@aptn.calast_img read more

StatCan October GDP flat compared with September up from 2016

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first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s economy took a pause in October, with gross domestic product unchanged from the previous month.Analysts had estimated that Canada’s GDP would grow 0.2 per cent from September, based on some of the recent October economic data released earlier this week by Statistics Canada.Goods-producing industries were down 0.4 per cent from September figures and service-producing industries were up 0.2 per cent, it said.CIBC economist Nick Exarhos said “the mood was running high” ahead of Friday’s report, but said strong wholesale and retail trade volumes reported earlier this week didn’t translate into the same degree of value-added growth.Statistics Canada said the value of wholesale trade was up 1.4 per cent from September, and the value of retail trade was up 1.1 per cent.“Collectively, they contributed a bit more than one tick to GDP, roughly half of what we would have expected heading into the release,” Exarhos wrote in a note to clients.Exarhos added that the mining, oil and gas sector was also softer than expected despite reports of strong production.Statistics Canada said that mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction declined 1.1 per cent.The agency reported that nine of the 20 industrial sectors that it monitors expanded in October, including manufacturing, which was up 0.1 per cent.“Except manufacturing, output in all goods-producing industries fell,” noted Arlene Kish, director for Canadian economics at IHS Markit.Statistics Canada said the mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector was down 1.1 per cent.“The drag from the oil and gas and mining industry was mostly related to maintenance operations within non-conventional oil activity . . . However, it should be noted that mining and quarrying activity as well as support activities for the entire sector were also down in the month,” Kish wrote.There were also contractions in the construction sector (down 0.1 per cent) and utilities (down 1.3 per cent)last_img read more

Canadian CEOs have already earned more than the average Canadian will this

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first_imgTORONTO – A policy think tank says Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs have already earned more than the average Canadian worker will make for all of this year.The 11th annual report on CEO compensation by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says the average CEO will have earned nearly $50,000 by 10:57 a.m. ET Tuesday, down from mid-afternoon when it first started studying the issue.Its latest report titled “Climbing up and Kicking Down” says the country’s top CEOs now make, on average, $10.4-million a year, or 209 times the average income of $49,738.That’s up from 193 times more in 2015.The report suggests that while the idea of a $15 per hour minimum wage has faced debate across Canada, rising CEO wages have gone largely unchecked.It concludes it isn’t likely that any one measure will curtail the overall growth in CEO compensation and decrease the record-high income gap between Canada’s top executives and the average worker.But it says Ottawa could consider more comprehensive amendments to the Income Tax Act and more broadly eliminate the tax preference that encourages companies to pay their executives in stock and stock derivatives rather than regular dollars.last_img read more

3 US banks post higher profits with huge assist from tax law

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first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Three of America’s biggest banks reported higher profits Friday, with a huge assist from the tax law passed late last year.JPMorgan reported a record quarterly profit, while Citigroup and Wells Fargo topped analyst expectations.Banks are expected to be major beneficiaries of the tax overhaul, which sharply lowered corporate tax rates. Comparing each of the effective tax rates from last year to this year, the three Wall Street banks that reported earnings Friday appeared to have saved roughly $1.6 billion altogether.The first-quarter earnings season will give investors and the public their first good look into how President Trump’s tax law is impacting Corporate America. Publicly traded banks are the first major industry to report their results each quarter.Net income at JPMorgan Chase, the nation’s largest bank by assets and deposits, rose 35 per cent to $8.71 billion. The result was primarily driven by two factors: higher interest rates, which have allowed banks such as JPMorgan to charge more for customers to borrow, and the lower corporate tax rate.However, JPMorgan had to set aside more money to cover bad loans in its consumer bank, where delinquencies have been steadily edging higher. JPMorgan shares fell 2.7 per cent, while shares of Wells Fargo slipped 3.4 per cent and Citigroup shares dropped 1.6 per cent.While JPMorgan’s pretax income rose by $2 billion in the quarter, the company said it effectively paid $240 million less in taxes compared to a year earlier. The bank paid an effective tax rate of 18.3 per cent in the quarter, compared with a rate of 22.7 per cent a year earlier. Before the changes to tax law, JPMorgan’s effective tax rate averaged in the high 20-per cent range.JPMorgan Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon has been a big promoter of the tax overhaul, saying it would be good for businesses as well as average Americans. Soon after President Donald Trump signed the law into place, the bank announced higher salaries for most of its retail bank employees, and said it would open branches in a handful of new markets. It also announced an expansion of small business lending.“The global economy continues to do well, and we remain optimistic about the positive impact of tax reform in the U.S. as business sentiment remains upbeat, and consumers benefit from job and wage growth,” Dimon in a statement.Other bank executives were just as optimistic when speaking about the tax law’s impact. Citigroup Chief Financial Officer John Gerspach told reporters Friday that businesses had only begun taking advantage of the changes.“I think the best is yet to come,” he said.Rising interest rates helped JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup, but not Wells Fargo, which continues to struggle under the weight of several scandals and investigations. Wells disclosed as part of its earnings that they may have to pay as much as $1 billion to federal regulators to settle investigations being conducted by financial regulatory agencies.The Federal Reserve has been steadily raising interest rates for more than two years. Net interest income at JPMorgan was $13.3 billion, up 10 per cent from a year earlier. At Citigroup, net interest revenues were $16.33 billion, up 12 per cent from a year earlier. Wells Fargo reported a slight decline in interest income.JPMorgan’s investment bank also had a solid quarter, helped by much more volatile and active markets last quarter. Net income in the investment bank was $3.97 billion, up from $3.24 billion a year earlier.There were some concerns about JPMorgan’s credit quality, however. The bank had to set aside more money to cover potentially bad loans, and the bank’s total charge-off rate — the percentage of loans it expects are not likely to be repaid — climbed to 1.20 per cent of all loans. That compares to 1.07 per cent of loans in the second quarter of 2017.Citi also had to add to its loan-loss reserves, and reported an 8 per cent increase in its total credit losses in the quarter.JPMorgan’s quarterly revenue was $28.52 billion, up from $25.85 billion. On a per-share basis, JPMorgan earned $2.37 a share, up from $1.65 per share, beating analysts’ forecasts.Citigroup reported a profit of $4.62 billion, or $1.68 a share, compared with a profit of $4.09 billion, or $1.35 per share, in the same period a year earlier. The results beat analysts’ forecasts for earnings of $1.61 a share, according to FactSet. It was the largest quarterly profit that Citi has reported since 2015.Wells reported first-quarter earnings of $5.9 billion, or $1.12 per share, topping Wall Street’s per-share expectations by 6 cents, according to a FactSet survey, That profit exceeds last year’s $5.46 billion, or $1.03 per share, in profit.Wells paid $1.37 billion in taxes in the first quarter, about 36 per cent less than the $2.13 billion it paid last year.___Ken Sweet covers banks and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at @kensweet.last_img read more