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Shelter calls for ban on letting agent fees in Wales

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first_imgHome » News » Shelter calls for ban on letting agent fees in Wales previous nextRegulation & LawShelter calls for ban on letting agent fees in WalesMystery shop of 85 letting agencies shows “widespread disregard for the law”.The Negotiator9th August 201601,131 Views Shelter is on the warpath again, reporting on its findings in a ‘mass participative mystery shop ’ of 85 lettings agents in Wales.The report, published on Friday, says that “Setting up a tenancy can be eye-wateringly expensive. Not only must new tenants find thousands of pounds upfront for tenancy deposits and rent in advance – they also have to pay fees to letting agents, which often cost hundreds and are difficult to compare in the marketplace.”Between January and March 2016 they reviewed websites and rang agents to find out what fees they charged and how they displayed them.“What we found amounts to a widespread disregard for the law. More than half of the agents we mystery shopped are not following legal requirements to display their fees clearly. Many agents gave information about fees over the phone that contradicted what was on their websites, while some appeared to be making up fees on the spot.“Overall, the highest fee was 12 times as high as the lowest.”Shelter says that this is “an uncompetitive market which is failing to drive down prices for the growing number of individuals, couples and families in Wales who rely on private rented housing. This needs to change.In the face of these realities there is only one realistic solution – to ban letting agents from charging fees to tenants to establish a tenancy.”Displaying fees The Consumer Rights Act 2015 requires agents to display a full list of fees in the office as well as on a website if applicable. However Shelter reported that more than half (52 per cent) did not display a clear list of fees on their website.Of these many mentioned that ‘a fee’ is required to begin a tenancy, but did not provide an actual price, or provide a way to calculate the amount of fees.“Not only does this mean that more than half of the agents we mystery shopped aren’t adhering to duties under the new law – it also means that people searching for a new home won’t be able to work out the full cost of moving until they contact the agent directly.“One letting agent actively refused to reveal any information to the mystery shopper, stating that no information on fees would be disclosed until prospective tenants register with the agent online. “Of the letting agents that offered enough information online to make a comparison with the information offered over the phone, Shelter says that more 55 per cent offered contradictory information.One agent’s website stated that its administration fee included a £100 registration fee for the first tenant plus £80 per additional tenant plus VAT. However the information offered over the phone by the same agent was £100 for one person or £125 for two people.Another letting agent’s website claimed an administration fee of £120. However the fee given over the phone was explained to vary between £150 and £295.Late payment feesMany agents apparently stated that as long as rent is paid within a few days of the due date then no action would be taken. However, “18 per cent of agents admitted they didn’t know if they charged a late fee, and some appeared to be making up a fee on the spot. For example, one agent stated that ‘nothing is set in stone’ and another said they ‘may charge for the hassle of chasing’.”52 per cent of agents are not displaying fees on their website as they are required to do by law.18 per cent said they didn’t know if they charged a late fee.Of the agents that did display fees online, more than half 55 per cent gave different fees over the phone.In response to the survey, Isobel Thomson, Chief Executive of the National Approved Letting Scheme (NALS) said, “We want a better, fairer, private rented sector for all, but banning letting agent fees in Wales is not the answer. Access to any form of housing tenure comes with associated costs, and renting in the private sector is no different. Letting agents are running businesses, and should be able to reasonably charge for the work they do in setting up a tenancy.“There are many letting agents across Wales who provide an excellent service, and stick to the rules, but the rogues need to be driven out. Trading standards and local authorities are responsible for enforcing the law on letting agents, and they must come down hard on any agent not displaying their fees.”letting agent fees ban on letting agent fees in Wales Shelter August 9, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

You started it… You invented printing

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The aim of this blog is to study how the modern press fares in its own spiritual stomping ground, and how all the stereotypes we had of the Germans are completely and entirely accurate. Germany has its tabloids to match The Sun, but its broadsheets are dull in appearance, so I’ll report back to you on whether they’re actually any fun to read, how they portray things and where they stand on political spectra. I’ll share with you the best (and worst) of the German media, giving you links for the benefit of the German speakers reading this. For those of you who don’t speak German — not a problem now, but there’ll be a test at the end. And of course I’ll translate anything important for the sake of the Little Englanders. Expect brief updates every couple of days and more substantial weekly contributions once a week. Please post your comments too — I want to know your views on the blog and the subject of it. It’s some 600 years since Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg was born in the historic German city of Mainz. After moving to Strasbourg, dabbling in a few trades and getting caught up in a marital legal case we don’t know much about, the son of a merchant took out a loan for a contraption that would revolutionise communications and, in truth, change the world. By 1450 Gutenberg’s printing press was up and running, and five years later his most famous output, the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, was published. The modern-day outcome of the invention credited to Gutenberg couldn’t be much further from the 180 or so Latin prints that appeared in the mid-15th century. They say the morning papers have replaced morning prayers, and today’s media — save for the brief Thought for the Day the BBC puts out to silence the traditionalists — suffers the odd indictment or two, or seven, for being an amoral and godless defamer. The British press are as fierce as they come. Tony Blair’s send-off to the media was a calculated stab in a speech to Reuters journalists, singling out the The Independent as an “impact” paper and branding the industry a “feral beast” — the title of this series of posts from the home of mass printing. He may well be right. Just a few miles to the east of Gutenberg’s birthplace is the financial hub of Frankfurt am Main, where I’m blogging from on my year away from Oxford. Frankfurt is to Mainz what today’s fierce press is to Gutenberg’s Bible — the fast-paced outcome of a capitalist 21st century. I like to see Frankfurt and Mainz as symbols of this change. One has a high-speed present, the other an engaging past which spawned the forefather of the information superhighway. Next time Blair wants to set the record straight, he knows where to lay the blame. Cherwell 24 is not responsible for the content of external links. read more

Oxford protests Cecil Rhodes

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first_imgWith this Oriel said that due to, “overwhelming support” the “debate has underlined that the continuing presence of these historical artefacts is an important reminder of the complexity of history and of the legacies of colonialism still felt today.”  Oriel, as of yet, have not released a statement following the protest.  According to the government’s scientific guidelines, protests are according to Dr. John Swartzberg “really the worst thing you can do from a pandemic standpoint”. One protester said: “This is an undeniably difficult circumstance for all, but ultimately you cannot tell an oppressed group how they should express their grievances. People here are being responsible and taking precautions”.  As reported by The Guardian in 2016, Chancellor Patten stated at the time, “If people at a university are not prepared to demonstrate the sort of generosity of spirit which Nelson Mandela showed towards Rhodes… then maybe they should think about being educated elsewhere”. Susan Brown, leader of Oxford City Council, had invited Oriel to apply for permission to remove the statue before the protest began. She said, “The question of statues and their historical context is not a simple matter, but sometimes acts of symbolism are important”.  The support for the movement was by no means limited to black students, with a diverse crowd in attendance to show their support for Rhodes Must Fall. One speaker stated, “Colonialism isn’t just Britain’s past, it’s Oxford’s present”.  The crowd chanted “take it down” and “decolonise”, accompanied with speeches of impassioned support from a wide variety of groups – and an 8 minute 46 seconds silent sit down in solidarity with George Floyd, as “that’s how long they knelt on his neck”.   Dr. Sandis said she “found it very difficult to be promoting one set of values, whilst showing people round” the university “with a completely different point of view” displayed in the “iconography everywhere”. Despite what she calls the institution’s “autonomy”, she concludes “we are not providing a welcoming environment” and she can “totally understand why people don’t want to be here, why should they?” “It’s difficult to enforce social distancing, but at the end of the day we’re not going to stop peaceful protests” says Police Constable Brock. He also commented on Rhodes Must Fall protest itself, stating, “I don’t know the politics behind it all, and all that sort of stuff”. However, PC Brock was very willing to listen to the many voices of the community addressing him with their explanations. He even proceeded to take the knee himself raising his fist in the air in support of the Black Lives Matter organisation and thanked “everyone here” for “the way this has been done”.  An Oriel student, Esther Agbolade questioned, “how can I go to a college like this?” She described her experience living within Oriel grounds, looking out her window and “making eye contact” with the statue. An online petition with some 150,000 signatures, describes it as synonymous with “colonialism, racism and patriarchy”. “You cannot expect me as a black student to endorse a statue like that up there” says Agbolade, “if you like history put it in a museum”. She added that the maintenance of the statue was proof that “you really don’t care about black students”.center_img “Statues are a reflection of the history that the present wants to represent”, states a protestor and Oxford History student at Trinity College. “We have seen statues of Hitler taken down, of Stalin, of Saddam Hussein, because people have determined that those symbols should not represent our present”. Protestors left placards on the ground or placed against Oriel’s building upon the completion of the entirely peaceful protest. A recent statement from the Oriel College governing body said it “abhors racism and discrimination in all its forms” and is “deeply committed to equality within our community at Oriel, the University of Oxford and the wider world”. Over a thousand people, of every college, faculty, and ethnicity, gathered on Tuesday to peacefully protest the statue of 19th century colonialist Cecil Rhodes mounted on the façade of Oriel College. Members of the protest moved through the crowd distributing masks for those without and offering hand sanitiser. Although it may have been attempted, a two-metre guideline was not maintained. Rebecca Surender (The University’s Advocate and PVC for Equality & Diversity) distanced the institution of Oxford from the college of Oriel, reiterating when asked for a statement that “Oriel College is an independent and autonomous organisation (from the University) and will make its own decisions regarding this issue”.  Both Oriel and the Chancellor have been contacted for a revision or maintenance of these sentiments but declined to send a response. Speaking with former Access Outreach Officer at Oxford, Dr. Elizabeth Sandis, she expressed her distaste to such claims of the complexity of this debate. “People talk about how nuanced these monuments are and how important it is to understand history in all its perspectives” citing the inscription bellow the statue (“E: LARGA :MVNIFICENTIA  CAECILII. : RHODES”, By means of the abundant munificence of Cecil Rhodes) ,”that’s not a very complex nuanced statement is it?” last_img read more

Letters From Around The World No. 4

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first_imgBY HENRY BENDER Hey Gang,Queen Victoria has her eye out for old Blackbeard. No BS! We’re under pirate alert! Captain Connery issued the warning after we departed Sri Lanka. Right now, we’re two degrees north of the equator, 68 degrees east of the Prime Meridian, heading southwest toward the Seychelles. Seas are calm, so Her Majesty’s zipping along at 21 knots. Flying fish are everywhere, and the sun’s beaming. Ninety degrees Fahrenheit, poolside! There isn’t a cloud in the sky. If we’re not captured or sunk, we’ll arrive in Port Victoria in a couple days.For a few nights, though, as we transit this sector of the Indian Ocean, the outside promenade on Deck 3 will be shut down, and Queen Victoria’s external lighting will be reduced to running lights and several deck lights. Guests in staterooms with balconies have been told to keep balcony lights off. And, curtains closed.  Yesterday, an exercise ran us through what to do in case we’re attacked. Of course, being a Brit and a master of understatement, Captain Connery didn’t say “attacked.” He said, “In the event of pirate activity.”It wasn’t much of a drill. Guests only had to return to their staterooms. Those in rooms with balconies and portholes sat in their hallway away from cabin doors. Guests with inside cabins enjoyed the luxury of being in their rooms.  A loud speaker summoned firefighters and security personnel to the outside promenade. Perhaps they were handed broomsticks and kitchen knives. I don’t know. Queen Victoria doesn’t carry firearms — so I’m told.In Aberdeen, Hong Kong, people still live on their boats.Passengers were jittery. Bits of bluster. False bravado. Empty threats. All the stuff that disguises fear floated down our hallway.“Bring ’em on, I was trained in hand to hand combat.”“Damn if I’m going to Somalia!”“I’ll jump ship.”Truth be told, no one knows how they’ll react.Karen asked if I was scared. “Heck no!” I lied. Then I tried being funny. “This is nothing compared to that crocodile cruise you had us on. Remember?”Mates, I was a basket case on that outing.Stubby the crocodile is tempted with a piece of meat.Queen Victoria was berthed in Darwin, the capital of Australia’s Northern Territory, when dear wifey got an itch to do something wild. Another city highlight tour wasn’t going to cut it for her. So, we ended up on the Adelaide River, 40 miles outside Darwin.Now mind you, the Adelaide is one of eight croc-infested rivers flowing through Australia’s Top End. Over 1,600 crocs swim in its waters. And yours truly suffers croc phobia. No lie! Remember Peter Pan? Well, the croc chasing Captain Hook scared the bejesus out of me. I was only five. Of course, Karen wasn’t aware of this. But then again, why would she? Twenty years of marriage, we’ve never seen Peter Pan together. Or, encountered crocs — until now. Anyhow, I was a Nervous Nellie. Whole ride out on the bus I kept mumbling: “Crocodile rocking is something shocking.” You recall that lyric, don’t you? It’s from Elton John’s hit single — Crocodile Rock. Karen thought I was trying to be funny. I wasn’t. I was reciting the line to keep from going bonkers. You know — a mantra.Out on the river I got worse. First, our guide, Captain Nigel, gave a spiel about lifejackets. “Whatever you do,” he said, “don’t put on a life vest if we sink. Crocs love orange. Just swim like hell for shore.”Swim like hell for shore? My heart bounced into overdrive. My best stroke is the doggie paddle.Then, five minutes later, a croc arrived for a meet and greet. I nearly brought up breakfast! This creature could’ve swallowed me whole. It was one of those Crocodile Dundee monsters. We were about a quarter mile down river.“Meet Stubby,” said Captain Nigel. “He’s a salty. A croc bit off part of his foot. They’re very territorial.”“Wonder how big the other beast was,” I whispered to Karen. I was turning into jelly. The croc lunges out of the water for his meal.Just so you know, two types of crocs make Australia their home: saltwater and freshwater. Salties feature broad snouts; they can grow to six meters—that’s 21 feet.  Freshies, on the other hand, their snouts are tapered and they can grow to four meters or 14 feet. Both can live in salt and fresh water.“Freshies, they’ll bite you,” said Capt. Nigel. “But only if you step on them. They’re quite timid. It’s the salties you have to watch out for. Like Stubby here. They’re aggressive and can crush a pig’s head in a single bite.”Talk about being a Nervous Nellie. I could barely watch as Captain Nigel’s assistant, a young Sheila named Donna, extended a pole and dangled a handful of chicken before Stubby’s eyes. At first, Mr. Stubby wasn’t too interested. Perhaps he was crotchety. Captain Nigel said a salty can live 70 years, and Stubby was pushing sixty. Anyway, he just swam by. But after a lap around our pontoon boat, the old boy couldn’t resist the swaying bait.First his snout, then his head, then half his body rose from the muddy river — an easy feat since a croc’s tail is pure muscle. Opening his mouth, he revealed a jagged set of pearly whites. Then swoosh. He disappeared. So did the chicken. Everyone applauded. Except me. I was trembling inside and out. Karen though didn’t notice. She was too caught up in the spectacle. It wasn’t until maybe forty minutes later that she overheard me mumbling “Crocodile rocking is something shocking.” I was on the edge of the seat, my hands clenched, head bowed, staring at my feet.“Stop it, would you,” she said, elbowing my ribs. “You’re embarrassing.”It wasn’t until we were on the bus, halfway back to Darwin, that I confessed my secret. But still, that didn’t get me any sympathy. Karen still thought I was loony. But hey, crocodiles scare me! Always have; always will. Panoramic views of Hong Kong’s soaring skyline unfold from Victoria Peak.Anyhow, sitting outside our cabin, Karen began imagining “What if” scenarios. What if we’re captured? What if they torture us? What if they kill you?I mean, she was terrifying me!So, finally, I slipped on a macho face and said, “Babe, quit worrying! People don’t take trips; trips take people. There isn’t squat we can do.”  Well, it was either my false bravado or John Steinbeck’s line from Travels with Charley that made an impression. Because Karen sighed, then smiled, and once again all was well.Anyhow, pirates or no pirates, mates, this trip’s been a whirlwind. And before I sign off, let me bring you up-to-date. After New Zealand—that’s where I last left off — Queen Victoria sailed for Sydney, Australia. Yes, we arrived safely. Of course, we toured Sydney’s opera house, who wouldn’t? It’s famous. We also boozed it up in the Fortune of War, Sydney’s oldest pub. A chalkboard sign reading, I can’t walk on water, but I can stagger on beer lured us in.  We even made it over to Manly Beach, a surfers’ haven, where we hung out with Mark and Julie Preece, owners of Manly Longboard Company. They were gearing up for the VISSLA Surf Pro championships.A stop in Sydney, Australia, includes a tour of the famous Opera House.In Brisbane, the capital of Queensland, dear Karen realized a life-long dream—she held a koala bear. A soft gray-haired tyke with big round eyes named Connor. A day later in the Whitsunday Islands, a Maori Wrasse stared me down while I realized my dream of scuba diving the Great Barrier Reef. Over on exotic Bali, we paid our tribute to the Hindu god, Vishnu. A giant 80-foot statue of the god, riding atop a mythological bird, called Garuda, can be seen for miles across the countryside. In the southernmost part of the island, we visited one of the most sacred temples of the Balinese people—the Uluwatu Cliff Temple. Believe me, the heat and humidity almost did us in climbing up the hundred plus steps.Then in Nam, we had the Mekong River experience. Did you know the Mekong originates in Tibet and flows through five countries before reaching Vietnam? I didn’t. A motorboat ran us out of My Tho to the island of Thoi Son. There we transferred to tiny sampans and paddled through a maze of narrow waterways. Afterwards we dined on Elephant Ear fish.Yes, we did get to Da Nang and Non Nuoc Beach. We rode across Dragon Bridge and even had pedicabs whisk us through the crowded downtown streets. Queen Victoria even stopped in Nha Trang, one of Vietnam’s most popular resorts — the food there was awesome!Karen Bender, the author’s wife, takes a ride in a pedicab in Vietnam.As you’d probably guess, Hong Kong’s magical. But the world of Suzy Wong is gone. Skyscrapers are the new norm. We rode Hong Kong’s Star Ferry around Victoria Harbor; shopped in Stanley Market, and had a sampan ride over in Aberdeen. A guided tour helped us reach Victoria Peak. And, of course, we witnessed Hong Kong’s Symphony of Lights. We couldn’t miss that. Every evening from 8 to 8:10, a kaleidoscope of colors decorates the sky. Singapore didn’t disappoint either. A trishaw sped us by Bugis Street Market, then through Little India, before we ended up at the famous Long Bar at the Raffles Hotel. Sometimes called the Writers Bar— Somerset Maughan and other scribes drank here — this is where the first Singapore Sling was served. Bartender Ngiam Tong Boom — you gotta love that name — gets all the honors.He came up with the concoction in 1915. Believe me, sitting there, drinking Tiger beer, and Singapore Slings, while listening to Dean Martin sing “Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime,” made an afternoon we’ll never forget. And Port Kelang, on Malaysia’s west coast, we’ll always remember this place, too. That’s for sure. On nearby Carey Island, we rubbed shoulders with descendants of the Mah Meri people; their ancestors date back over 3,000 years. I even took part in a mock wedding ceremony staged inside the Mah Meri Cultural Village. No kidding. I was father of the groom. Not an enviable position, when it’s discovered your son isn’t a virgin. Ha! I had to pay daughter-in-law’s parents 21 water buffalo!A statue in Bali depicts the Hindu god Vishnu riding a mythological bird.Three days after that experience, we called on Sri Lanka; you know, that pear-shaped island off the southern tip of India. For about three hours, Karen and I toured Colombo, the capital city, by bus. We stuck our heads in Buddhist temples, Hindu temples, you name it. What’s fascinating, all the street names are in three different languages — Sinhalese, Tamil, and English. Which I guess isn’t too surprising — Colombo’s situated at the crossroads of the ancient spice routes.Well, as I said to you earlier, we’re bound for the Seychelles. It’s not really a long run — about 830 nautical miles. But it is dangerous. Our captain has made that clear. So, please cross your fingers for us. Karen and I don’t want “pirate activity” stopping Queen Victoria from sailing her last leg. Or, for that matter, stopping me from writing my final letter! Mates, I’ll be in touch soon — if all goes well.Karen Bender holds a koala bear named Connor at a sanctuary in Brisbane, Australia.Sampans ply the back waterways off the Mekong River in Vietnam.The Sydney Harbor Bridge, which you can climb for $300.      Editor’s note: Henry Bender, of Ocean City, is a retired Ocean City High School English teacher turned full-time writer and global traveler. His seashore-themed book, “Stirring the Dust,” is a compilation of his articles and columns that appeared in newspapers and other publications. Accompanied by his wife, Karen, he is writing a first-hand account of his around-the-world cruise aboard the Queen Victoria for MediaWize/OCNJDaily.com. This is the fourth of five articles. Inside a Buddhist temple in Colombo, Sri Lanka. (Photos courtesy of Henry Bender)last_img read more

Exhibition set to boost sales

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first_imgDon’t forget to register to visit Bakers’ Fair, supported by Norbake, taking place at Manchester Armitage Centre on Sunday 4 October. Entry is free, and visitors will have the chance to pick up lots of new tips and ideas for their businesses, as well as checking out the Richemont Club of Great Britain’s Annual Competition, including its live cake decorating challenge.At the Stage Area, visitors can watch presentations from NAMB chairman Mike Holling, who will be talking about how craft bakers can survive on the high street, while NAMB director Anthony Kindred will discuss salt reduction. Software company RedBlack will illustrate the benefits of bakery software.The show is open from 9.30am to 4pm. For tickets, call 01792 365902 or register at www.bakersfair.co.uklast_img read more

All-Star Tributes To Jerry Garcia & Dr. John To Be Released On CD/DVD

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first_imgLast year marked the beginning of a new and exciting tradition, as all-star tribute concerts popped up across the country for a number of beloved artists. Put on by the group Blackbird Presents, tributes to Jerry Garcia, Dr. John and Emmylou Harris captured the imaginations of musicians everywhere, and entranced fans with creative interpretations of legendary songs.Today we’ve learned that all three of those tributes will be released on CD and DVD, though the dates of these releases have yet to be revealed. The Dear Jerry tribute was easily one of the most exciting evenings of music, with all four surviving members of the Grateful Dead on hand, as well as performances from Widespread Panic, moe., Bruce Hornsby, Grace Potter, Jimmy Cliff, David Grisman, Jorma Kaukonen, Railroad Earth, The Disco Biscuits and more. For more about the releases, head to Blackbird’s website. You can also relive “Dear Jerry” through Erik Kabik’s photo gallery below: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Training Slated.

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first_imgThe Georgia Golf Course Superintendents Association has planned a Spray Technicians Seminar Feb. 8 at Eagle’s Landing Country Club in Stockbridge, Ga. The program is designed to keep people who maintain golf courses updated on the latest in pesticide application, safety and technology. The training should provide 6 hours pesticide recertification credit. It will begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 4:15 p.m. The fee is $40. For more information or a registration form, call Karen White at (706) 742-2651.last_img read more

Organic gardening 101

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first_imgMany gardeners are eager to jump on the organic gardening bandwagon. However, just as many are not able to pin down what it means to be an organic grower.A generally accepted definition of organic gardening is the use of cultural practices to improve soil and plant health in order to reduce plant problems without the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. Control pests with organic productsDoes organic gardening mean saying no to pesticides? The surprising answer is no. Many organic pesticides are available on the market to purchase and use safely in your garden. Typically these products are derived from natural, rather than synthetic, sources and work on a variety of pests. Marketing organic products to consumers continues to increase, but gardeners should be wary. Using products labeled as organic does not automatically make your garden productive. Cultural practices will be your most important tool. You need to review your gardening philosophy and adopt practices that will improve the soil, help you grow healthy plants and prevent pest problems. A few examples of organic gardening practices include amending soil, soil testing, crop rotation, companion planting, using disease resistant plant varieties, mulching and sanitation. It all starts with good soilThe basis for growing healthy plants in an organic garden begins with the soil. Healthy soil lays the groundwork for healthy plants. Organic gardeners must work hard to build and maintain soil health. In some parts of Georgia, this can be a real chore, so it is important to have a long-term outlook on soil preparation. Good soil has plenty of organic matter, which can include decaying plants, composted manure, composted shredded wood and other natural mediums. These materials decay in the soil, slowly releasing nutrients and improving soil structure and drainage. Consider having your soil tested through your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office. A soil test report provides information regarding the soil’s fertility status. This is critical to plant health and growth. A soil test will provide data about the soil pH and recommend how to improve the soil for maximum productivity. Growing plants organically requires more planning and labor than conventional gardens, but in the end will be more rewarding.last_img read more

Sally Beauty reveals POS compromise

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first_imgby: Roy UrricoThe Denton, Texas-based Sally Beauty Holdings admitted in a statement that attackers inserted malware into multiple POS systems at its U.S. stores between March 6 and April 17, putting customer information in jeopardy.“Payment card information of customers that used cards at affected U.S. Sally Beauty stores during this time may have been put at risk,” the retailer stated. The company said on May 4 that it was investigating reports of unusual card activity. Sally Beauty also suffered a data breach in early 2014. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

The Masters: Phil Mickelson excels tee to green, but rues ‘horrific putting’ | Golf News

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first_img– Advertisement – Mickelson is hitting the ball well, but not putting well Bernhard Langer is the oldest player to make the cut Bernhard Langer is the oldest player to make the cut