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Forecastle Festival Welcomes Largest Crowd Ever For The Avett Brothers, Alabama Shakes & More [Gallery]

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first_imgLoad remaining images Louisville’s Forecastle Festival had a record breaking year this past weekend, welcoming more than 65,000 attendees over the course of three days at scenic Waterfront Park. Major acts from all over the map including The Avett Brothers, Alabama Shakes, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, Gary Clark Jr., Brandi Carlile, Big Gigantic, Grouplove, Dr. Dog, Ghostland Observatory, and Shakey Graves fronted the bill, drawing in fans of all genres for three days of music, art, and family-friendly activities.Check out some of our favorite highlights from the weekend, by John J Miller Photography.Death Cab for CutieDanny BrownAlabama ShakesBrandi CarlileSpeedy OrtizGrouploveBen Harper & The Innocent CriminalsThe Avett BrothersAndrew McMahon In The WildernessMoon TaxiFull Gallery:last_img read more

Long-awaited Delhi giant pumpkin now reaching nearly 400 pounds

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first_imgChytalo had a goal of 100 pounds for this year’s giant pumpkin by the third week of the month, but as of Wednesday, he said it’s nearly 400 pounds! DELHI (WBNG) — A local man has been growing giant pumpkins at Delaware Academy for years, and this season’s patch is doing extremely well. Ed Chytalo grows pumpkins in the school’s garden. No normal jack-o-lanterns, however, these pumpkins are hundreds and hundreds of pounds.center_img “I promised her that the kids because of the corona pandemic, I promised them a real giant this year, so when they get out on the elementary playground, it’s going to put so much smiles on their faces, it’s going to be phenomenal,” explained Chytalo. Last year, he brought the pumpkin all the way down to Times Square in New York City to show off, but isn’t sure that will be possible this year due to the pandemic.last_img read more

Field trip to eternity

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first_imgRicky Jackson and Russ Grimm both played at the University of Pittsburgh under Jackie Sherrill. Both were drafted in the second and third rounds in 1981 by the Saints and the Redskins, respectively. Imagine some of the practices at Pitt in the late ’70s! How could Sherrill prevent unintended bloodshed with Grimm and Jimbo Covert on the offensive line and Jackson along with Hugh Green patrolling along the line of scrimmage for the Panthers? Jackson talked about his Pittsburgh connection. “I tell you, I end up going to the University of Pittsburgh. We had a lot of great athletes. You got Russ Grimm, Dan Marino, Mark May. When I went there on a recruiting trip they had Tony Dorsett showing most of us around. They had just won the national championship. They was 12-0. One thing that I can say, coach Jackie Sherrill, he put a lot of young men together from all walks of life.”In the beginning of an emotional acceptance speech Grimm said; “Of all the guys that I could’ve picked, [to introduce him] I knew picking Joe [Bugel] would start me out being a little bit emotional, but with the humidity and some of the pollen, if I start to tear up little bit, that’s the reason.” During Grimm’s stellar career, I am certain that many defensive linemen “cried a few tears” at the thought of spending 60 minutes picking themselves up after being brutalized by Grimm and the rest of his “hog mates.’The football intellect and savvy of legendary Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau has not, now or ever really been questioned. Michael Herr, writing for the Detroit News, asked LeBeau if he remembered an incident in which Lions head coach Joe Schmidt had considered using LeBeau as a player/coach late in his playing career.LeBeau said that; “Actually, I remember it very well. Coach [Bud] Grant from the Vikings had called Coach Joe about the possibility of me going to work up there. Joe said no, he’s going to continue to play. I guess that might have gotten Joe thinking about using me as a player coach. We talked about it a couple of times. I think that’s about where it ended. I think that I really would have liked to have done that because I was quite a bit older than most of the guys anyhow but there had not been a whole lot of player-coaches in the history of the league but I would have liked to have tried it. I kind of knew from a pretty early age that I was going to go into coaching on some level.”The love that LeBeau had for his players was obvious in his humble and emotion- filled acceptance speech. He pointed out that “A few years ago we played in this game. Joey Porter and James Farrior got this idea that they would put on Dick LeBeau jerseys and wear them all over. Last year Rod Woodson stood up here in his induction speech and he mentioned me.” He also talked about Ike Taylor. “I might be a bit off on this but when I first came there [Pittsburgh], I don’t think I started him [in] one game. Now he’s started every game that we’ve played for the last six years. He hasn’t missed a game, hasn’t missed a snap. That’s a great record of durability and dependability. “But back to Little who grew up in a time when it was okay for African-Americans to belittle each other because of their skin “tone” and “African” physical characteristics.Gary Smith wrote for Sports Illustrated that Little had an “old hurt from childhood when even Black kids called him Cheetah, after Tarzan’s chimp, because his skin was so Black.” It is apparent that time and life’s experiences have added class and clarity to the journey of Little and have been the ointment that helped heal those old wounds. Little said, “There’s no words to describe the joy of experiencing this final sports chapter of my life. Every player wakes up wishing to have this honor. I have been favored by God and by those who have had a say in what happens to me.”Indeed if the pilgrimage to Canton by the 2010 Steelers to honor and induct Dick LeBeau and his fellow “classmates” into the “corridors of forever” amounted to a “field trip” then that getaway from school has to be one of the greatest trips of all time.(Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com or 412-583-6741.) There was something special in the air regarding the 2010 Pro Football Hall-of-Fame inductees. All of these men deserved to be enshrined and in the case of Floyd Little and Dick LeBeau, better late than never. What struck me, aside from the heat and humidity at Canton, was the humility of Russ Grimm and LeBeau; the swagger and bright personality of Emmitt Smith; the coolness and calm confidence of Jerry Rice; the quiet intensity of Ricky Jackson; the craftiness of John Randle and the relieved smile of Little. They all have my heartfelt congratulations at being part of one the world’s greatest sports fraternities. Oh by the way, Emmitt Smith gave a 24-minute speech without any notes and without the use of a teleprompter. Mr. Smith does not need me to write any of his quotes.last_img read more

OBITUARY John D Poland 72

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first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — John D. Poland, age 72, of Landaff, NH, formerly a long-time resident of Wilmington, MA, passed away peacefully at home on July 14, 2018.John was the beloved husband of Rita M. (Collins) Poland, devoted father of the late John D. “Dug” Poland, Jr., cherished son of the late Leo and Alice (Foote) Poland, dear brother of David Poland & wife Serena of Mesa, AZ, Susan “Sue” Moriarty & husband Ted of Stratham, NH, Marcia Howell of Mooresville, NC and Jacqueline Marchese & husband Stephen of Burlington. Brother-in-law of Fran Coleman of Tewksbury, Dan Collins and Marcia Consilvio & husband Ed all of Arlington, Loretta Thomas & husband Robert of Woburn, Patty Mitchell & husband Bucky of Windham, ME, Michael Collins of Tequesta, FL, Steven Collins of Standish, ME, Elizabeth Murphy & husband Philip of Melbourne Beach, FL and Karen Ashman of Leominster. John is also survived by many loving nieces and nephews.Family and friends will gather for a Funeral Service at the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62), Wilmington, MA on Saturday, July 21st at 11:00 a.m. Interment will follow in Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington, MA.In lieu of flowers donations in John’s memory may be made to Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth (CHaD), 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03766 or to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Stephen J. Bowker, 58In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Morris “Moe” Anderson, 68In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: John A. Townsend, 55In “Obituaries”last_img read more

129000 Rohingyas trapped in squalid Myanmar camps

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first_imgRohingya Muslim children and elders gather at the Thet Kel Pyin camp in Rakhine state during the Eid al-Adha celebrations on 22 August 2018. Photo: AFPAbdurahim worries the lack of food, medicine and free movement is doing lasting damage to his four young children, who are among more than 129,000 Rohingya Muslims trapped in squalid camps inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state.In the grimy, rubbish-strewn alleyways of Thet Kel Pyin camp, near the state capital Sittwe, children gather around a slaughtered cow, a rare chance to eat meat on the second day of the Eid al-Adha festival.Most of the camp’s residents were forced from their homes in 2012, victims of ethnic and religious hatreds that have simmered for decades.Cut off from outside contact, their plight is rarely reported.Abdurahim, 46, fears that everyday life in the camp-split communities, restricted movement for the Rohingya and dependency on relief handouts-will shape his children forever.Aged between eight and 17, their formative years have been spent in Thet Kel Pyin, where the family arrived six years ago.“What kind of memory comes into their head? They think only one ethnicity lives like this,” Abdurahim-whose Myanmar name is Shwe Hla-told AFP.“Their vision is becoming like this.”His family’s struggle is overshadowed by the vast scale of the Rohingya refugee exodus into neighbouring Bangladesh that began one year ago.An army crackdown last August saw 700,000 of the persecuted minority flee over the border to one of the world’s largest refugee camps in violence the UN and US have likened to ethnic cleansing.Grim realityConditions in Thet Kel Pyin, witnessed during a brief visit late Wednesday on a government-steered press trip, suggested a dire need for food, education, jobs and medical services.But it is probably among the better camps in Rakhine, where government minders are willing to take media and visiting dignitaries.Visitors are denied access to other sites, like those in remote Pauktaw township where more than 22,000 eke out an existence in shelters built upon piles of garbage and excrement.Kaman Muslims live alongside the Rohingya in the camps, where many struggle with deteriorating health.“After six years here, our health is worsening,” said Thin Mya, a 64-year-old Kaman Muslim mother of four. “The rooms are so close to each other so… the health problem is getting bigger.”The first step to improving the grim reality of internally displaced Rohingya is “freedom of movement”, said Abdurahim, once a prosperous owner of a construction business in Sittwe.Myanmar says it is ready and willing to repatriate the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya who have fled to Bangladesh since last year.But it has complicated the process with bureaucracy while the refugees refuse to return without guarantees of safety, security and compensation.The UN has said conditions in Myanmar are not ripe for a safe and voluntary repatriation, especially given the desperate conditions in camps like Thet Kel Pyin, which were established after previous rounds of violence.To head off criticism, Myanmar says it will close nearly 20 of the camps in coming months.State media on Tuesday said one camp had been closed at Ni Din in the Kyauktaw area of Rakhine, following recommendations by the late United Nations secretary-general Kofi Annan released last year.But the UN’s Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs questioned whether these “so-called camp ‘closures’” were being done in the spirit of those recommendations, which emphasised an end to movement restrictions and granting the Rohingya a pathway to citizenship.“What matters most is not whether a camp is closed, but whether the displaced people in them can go home or be relocated in a process that profoundly transforms their lives,” OCHA spokesperson Pierre Peron told AFP.Myanmar’s government denies allegations of ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, yet labels them “Bengalis” non-native to the Buddhist-majority country.It insists that any Rohingya who return from Bangladesh should take up a National Verification Card, a form of ID that falls short of citizenship and denies them full rights.“Why do we need to hold this National Verification Card?” said Abdurahim. “We have lived here for generations.”last_img read more

Full Show Political Roundup And Lessons From Hurricane Carla Aug 8 2018

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first_imgListen On Wednesday’s Houston Matters: From the latest on Paul Manafort’s trial, to Pres. Trump’s latest tweets related to Russia, our experts discuss the latest national, state, and local political stories with an eye for how they might affect Houston and Texas.Also this hour: We look back at lessons learned from Hurricane Carla in 1961 in the latest installment of Houston Public Media’s new podcast, Hurricane Season. And writer Richard Rhodes pores through history for examples of how humanity has weathered transitions from one form of energy to another for his latest book, Energy: A Human History.We offer a free, podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and other podcasting apps. This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Share 00:00 /50:48 center_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more