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When traditions gave way to war

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first_imgIt was 1941. A gallon of gas cost 12 cents. “Dumbo” and “Citizen Kane” hit the movie screen. The U.S. Army adopted the Jeep.When the Class of 1941 entered Harvard, the University still had a full-fledged polo team (now a club), which was a favored destination for future Army officers enamored of the cavalry. There was also an annual freshman smoker in Memorial Hall. In May 1938, 1,000 students from the class attended a performance by circus giant Jack Earle, adventurer Frank “Bring ‘Em Back Alive” Buck, and bubble dancer Sally Rand. She kept her clothes on, and delivered a lecture called “How To Be Intelligent Though Educated.”Last week (May 25-26), during the 70th class reunion, there were no adventurers or burlesque dancers on the program.  But 20 members of the class did return, often with their children and grandchildren. There was plenty of discussion, and that was bittersweet too. (At Harvard, the 70th is the last class anniversary officially celebrated.)In the diversified class were two ministers, a lumber executive, a professor of surgery, two scoutmasters, and an antiques hobbyist. All had retired long ago. There was a political scientist, who in his younger days traveled the world for the United Nations. Also on hand was a onetime Time magazine correspondent and a State Department security expert. (He spent the first 18 months of his World War II naval service cruising the West Indies in a converted yacht.) There was a Connecticut bookstore owner — who for years had scouted the Yale football team for Harvard. There was also a biologist who was a world expert on the anatomy of turtle legs.John Francis Ambrose ’41 was there too. When he entered Harvard in the fall of 1937, he left behind a neighborhood in Queens that had turned out en masse to celebrate his scholarship. His father was a New York City policeman with an eighth-grade education.In those days, parents wrote letters as part of the application process, and the elder Ambrose apologized for his handwriting. “He couldn’t write profoundly,” said the younger Ambrose, who just turned 92. “But he wrote a wonderful letter.” His father died during freshman year, and to this day Ambrose remembers the late-night knock on the door to his fourth-floor room in Thayer Hall. He blames his father’s early death on years of nighttime, all-weather police duty, walking a beat on the waterfront.On the first day of the reunion, Ambrose stood near an upstairs bar at the Doubletree Hotel in Boston. He wore a lime green summer jacket and bright yellow pants. In his hand was a tall glass of amber liquid, no ice. “I learned this in England,” he said, hoisting the glass in a toast. “I never knew what scotch was. But I’ve loved it ever since.”Ambrose first visited England for far less enjoyable reasons. He was a 39th Infantry lieutenant with the 1st Army’s storied 9th Infantry Division, and was getting his platoon ready for the Normandy landings. Behind him was plenty of fighting. Ambrose was with the 9th — among the first American units to see combat in World War II — when it landed in North Africa in November 1942. Then came months of heavy fighting in Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, and Sicily.Late in 1943, when he sipped his first scotch in England, Ambrose was a platoon leader with an anti-tank unit. Ahead of him were the Normandy landings (he reached Utah Beach on D plus 4), and combat in France, the Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe. Ambrose remembers the Normandy hedgerows, the St. Lo breakout, the Battle of the Bulge, and Hürtgen Forest, and doesn’t want to recall any of them.“It was necessary for the country, an experience you wanted to finish,” he said. “It took a long time.” (The 9th spent 304 days in combat, had four Medal of Honor winners, and captured 130,000 Germans. More than 22,000 of its men were killed, wounded, or went missing.)“It wasn’t until the war developed that it made me see the necessity of it,” said Ambrose, who survived seven major campaigns. “I wasn’t worried about the war until it started.”After the war, he made a career in business, starting with Vicks VapoRub, then moving on to the rubber industry, and then settling in for a long run with a New York trade association specializing in silver — a market he still watches. He and his wife, now deceased, raised three daughters and a son.At Harvard, Ambrose was a government concentrator who enjoyed English courses too. He remembered that poet Robert Frost lived upstairs from him at Adams House for a while and used to meet with students in the community room.He had three older brothers, none of them college graduates. Ambrose entered on scholarships from the Harvard Club of New York City (where Chauncey D. Stillman ’29 was his mentor), and from the Price Greenleaf Fund. He worked as a cataloger at Widener Library for 50 cents an hour.With his scotch barely touched in front of him, Ambrose remembered his freshman year at Harvard. That fall, the whole family boarded an Eastern Steamship Lines ship and sailed to Boston to drop him off. All these years later, Ambrose was back with his present-day family. He took a walk through Harvard Yard on his arrival. “It really didn’t look different to me,” he said. “People still tend to gather around the [John Harvard] statue.”last_img read more

Tim Krul reveals what he told Mesut Ozil after Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang penalty controversy

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first_imgKrul wasn’t happy with Arsenal’s first goal (Picture: Getty)Norwich goalkeeper Tim Krul was frustrated by Arsenal’s first goal in a 2-2 draw at Carrow Road and revealed he told Arsenal playmaker Mesut Ozil his side had got lucky in the aftermath of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s strike from the penalty spot.Krul had few complaints about the penalty being awarded in the first place – after Christoph Zimmermann clumsily handled the ball inside the area – but he was frustrated that a retake was ordered after he’d saved Aubameyang’s initial spot kick.Aubameyang slotted in the second attempt – celebrating by shushing the Norwich goalkeeper, who had been trying to distract him before taking the penalty – and Krul was seen clashing with Ozil amid Arsenal’s celebrations. Advertisement Aubameyang made no mistake with his second penalty attempt against Norwich (Picture: Getty)Asked by Sky Sports if he’d had a bit of afters with Aubameyang and Ozil once the goal had gone in, Krul replied: ‘No, no.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I just said to Ozil – they were celebrating – I said, you’re lucky!‘Because the referee obviously helped them a lot there.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityHe added: ‘It was a shame to concede a penalty like that.‘Obviously I could see Zimmo handballing it – I don’t know if it was a push or something.‘Yeah, it was a shame because obviously we were so solid all the game through and it was just a setpiece that killed us really with that. Ozil spoke with Krul after the penalty had been scored (Picture: Getty)‘Listen for me the job is to get in the striker’s head and doubt himself and I feel especially at home you’ve got the crowd behind you.‘I took a bit longer than the referee liked and he gave me a yellow card, rightly so, because I came off my line again but at the end of the day I saved it and it was frustrating that it had to be retaken I think just because one of our lads has run in too quick, I think.’It was a frustrating day for Arsenal, with Teemu Pukki and Todd Cantwell twice giving Norwich deserved leads before star man Aubameyang hit back. Bernd Leno was certainly the busier of the two goalkeepers.Will Freddie Ljungberg succeed at Arsenal?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsMORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang mocks Tim Krul after converting second penalty attempt against NorwichMORE: Why Freddie Ljungberg has started Kieran Tierney on bench for Arsenal’s clash with Norwich Commentcenter_img Advertisement Tim Krul reveals what he told Mesut Ozil after Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang penalty controversy Metro Sport ReporterSunday 1 Dec 2019 4:22 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link125Shareslast_img read more

Sheriff’s Cup scheduled to begin March 9

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first_imgELLSWORTH — This year’s Sheriff’s Cup is scheduled to be held March 9-11 in Ellsworth.Admission costs for adults are $4 for a day pass, $6 for a two-day pass and $10 for the weekend. Costs for kids are $2 for a day pass, $3 for a two-day pass and $5 for the weekend.Games will be played at Ellsworth High School, Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School and the Down East Family YMCA.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img

Kuldeep hat-trick; Rohit, Rahul hundreds crush Windies

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first_imgVISAKHAPATNAM, India (CMC) – In-form Shai Hope and Nicholas Pooran carved out contrasting half-centuries but Kuldeep Yadav’s dramatic hat-trick crippled West Indies’ run chase and propelled India to a series-levelling 107-run victory in the second One-Day International here yesterday.Chasing a mammoth 388 at the ACA-VDCA Stadium after openers Rohit Sharma (159) and KL Rahul (102) slammed scintillating hundreds, West Indies were challenging at 192 for three in the 30th over and creating some worry in the Indian ranksBut Kuldeep intervened with his left-arm spin to knock over Hope, Jason Holder (11) and Alzarri Joseph (0) in successive deliveries in the 33rd over as West Indies lost their last seven wickets for 88 runs to be all out for 280 in the 44th.Hope stroked a top score of 78 off 85 deliveries while Pooran unleashed a breathtaking 47-ball 75 but their dismissals ended all hope of pulling off the record run chase.With the game gone, all-rounder Keemo Paul lashed a stroked-filled 46 from 40 balls, in an attempt to take some of the shine off India’s convincing win.Kuldeep finished with three for 52 while seamer Mohammed Shami picked up three for 39, including the key wickets of Pooran and captain Kieron Pollard (0) off successive deliveries in the 30th over.The victory saw India avoid a series defeat to West Indies and turn Sunday’s final game in Cuttack into a series- decider.Sent in, India flourished through Rohit and Rahul, the pair posting an astonishing 227 at the top of the order – a record first-wicket stand for the hosts against West Indies.Man-of-the-Match Rohit Sharma crunched 17 fours and five sixes in his 28th ODI ton.Rohit, a deserving Man-of-the-Match, crunched 17 fours and five sixes in a knock lasting 138 balls while Rahul chipped in with eight fours and three sixes off 104 deliveries.Rahul, though, was first to his fifty off 46 balls in the 16th over and Rohit followed in the 22nd over, bringing up his landmark off 67 balls by pulling seamer Paul to the square boundary.Capitalising on a dropped chance on 70, Rohit raced to his 28th ODI hundred off 107 balls in the 34th over and Rohit joined him three overs later, reaching his fifth one-day century off 103 balls.The stand ended when Rahul was taken at third man off pacer Alzarri Joseph off the final ball of the same over and the Caribbean side struck again in the next over, the 38th, when Pollard removed his opposite number Virat Kohli for a first-ball ‘duck’.However, Shreyas Iyer, who slammed 53 from 32 deliveries, then put on a further 60 for the third wicket with Rohit and 73 for the fourth wicket with Pant (39), to get India up to their second highest-ever total against West Indies and ninth highest total overall.Needing to score at nearly eight runs an over, Hope and Lewis gave West Indies a solid, if not dashing, start to their run chase when they posted 61 off 66 balls to deny India early success.Surviving a chance at slip off the fourth ball of the innings before he had scored, Hope struck seven fours and three sixes while the left-handed Lewis punched five fours in a 35-ball stay at the crease.With the required run rate steadily rising, Lewis holed out to deep square off pacer Shardul Thakur in the 11th over and first-match century-maker Shimron Hetmyer lasted just seven balls before he was run-out for four going for a second run in the 14th over.When left-arm spinner Ravindra Jadeja squared up Roston Chase (4) and rocked back his off-stump, West Indies were reeling at 86 for three in the 16th over – having lost three wickets for 25 runs in the space of 30 balls.Pooran then entered to unveil a gem of an innings, belting half-dozen fours and sixes in an up tempo 106-run fourth-wicket stand with Hope to give the Windies Hope.While Hope reached his fifty off 58 deliveries, Pooran wasted little time in racing to his – the fourth of a promising career – off 34 balls in the 27th over with disdainful pull to the mid-wicket boundary off pacer Deepak Chahar.Dropped on 22 in the 24th over, Pooran eventually perished in the 30th over, top-edging Shami to Iyer at long leg and off the very next ball, Pollard edged one that left him and was caught at the wicket.Hope was eyeing a third straight ODI hundred when he swung Kuldeep to Kohli at deep mid-wicket. Holder, who had crossed, was then deceived and stumped by Pant and Joseph edged a prod to Kedar Jadhav at slip, to give Kuldeep the second hat-trick of his career.INDIA inningsRohit Sharma c wkp. Hope b Cottrell 159KL Rahul c Chase b Joseph 102V. Kohli c Chase b Pollard 0S. Iyer c wkp. Hope b Cottrell 53R. Pant c Pooran b Paul 39K. Jadhav not out 16R. Jadeja not out 0Extras: (b-1, lb-3, nb-1, w-13) 18Total: (5 wkts, 50 overs) 387Fall of wickets: 1-227, 2-232, 3-292, 4-365, 5-373.Bowling: Cottrell 9-0-83-2 (w-2), Holder 9-0-45-0 (w-1), Pierre 9-0-62-0 (w-2), Paul 7-0-57-1 (w-1), Joseph 9-1-68-1 (w-3), Chase 5-0-48-0 (w-3, nb-1), Pollard 2-0-20-1 (w-1).WEST INDIES inningsE. Lewis c Iyer b Thakur 30S. Hope c Kohli b Yadav 78S. Hetmyer run-out 4R. Chase b Jadeja 4N. Pooran c Kuldeep Yadav b Mohammed Shami 75K. Pollard c wkp. Pant b Mohammed Shami 0J. Holder stp. Pant b Kuldeep Yadav 11K. Paul b Mohammed Shami 46A. Joseph c Jadhav b Kuldeep Yadav 0K. Pierre c Kohli b Jadeja 21S. Cottrell not out 0Extras: (b-1, lb-2, w-8) 11Total: (all out, 43.3 overs) 280Fall of wickets: 1-61, 2-73, 3-86, 4-192, 5-192, 6-210, 7-210, 8-210, 9-260.Bowling: Chahar 7-1-44-0 (w-2), Thakur 8-0-55-1 (w-2), Shami 7.3-0-39-3 (w-1), Jadeja 10-0-74-2 (w-1), Yadav 10-0-52-3, Iyer 1-0-13-0 (w-2).Man-of-the-Match: Rohit Sharma.last_img read more

Women’s hoops notches W over Long Beach State

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first_imgJunior guard Minyon Moore (center) dribbles through opposing defenders at Galen Center. (Josh Dunst | Daily Trojan)Behind 40 combined points from senior shooting guard Aliyah Mazyck and junior guard Minyon Moore Sunday at Walter Pyramid, the women’s basketball team improved to 2-0 after defeating Long Beach State 86-50.Mazyck scored 17 of her 19 points in the first half, shooting 6-of-9 from the field and 4-of-6 from beyond-the-arc. Mazyck finished the game with 26 minutes, 19 points and four rebounds. Moore was 4-of-4 from the field for 10 points in the first half, including 2 points from the free throw line. The junior guard finished with 21 points in 32 minutes, leading all scorers. She also added seven rebounds, seven assists and four steals to her total. “[Minyon] has an elite skill, and that skill is playing hard,” head coach Mark Trakh said. “She gets after it, she rebounds defends, scores at a high rate … She’s an overall great player.”The Trojans had some solid performances off the bench. Redshirt sophomore forward Asiah Jones  did not wait long to get her college career started. Coming off her first career college game where she scored 4 points with five rebounds, Jones showed improvement by leading all non-starters in minutes, points and rebounds with 18, 9 and six, respectively. In addition, senior Cheyanne Wallace went 5-of-8 at the free throw line. Wallace finished with 5 points in 16 minutes.The Trojans began the game fast, scoring 8 straight points before giving up a 3-pointer to sophomore Naomi Hunt three minutes into the game. The Trojans finished the first quarter with a 23-8 run that extended to a 31-9 run four minutes into the second quarter. USC finished a dominant half shooting 60 percent from the field, taking a commanding 51-22 lead at halftime.“In the first half we focused … we’re executing our offense, we really focused on our defense. So the first half gets an A-plus,” Trakh said. “But we lost our focus, we lost our discipline in the third quarter. We started making mistakes on defense, and made some mistakes on offense … We need to be focused for 40 minutes not 20.”After a trip to the charity stripe by Wallace in the third quarter, the Women of Troy extended their lead to 37, the greatest margin of the night. USC dominated the post with 38 total points in the paint while out-rebounding the 49ers 50-24. Minyon and senior guard Mariya Moore combined for 16 boards on the night. The Trojans also scored 33 points off Long Beach State’s 24 turnovers, another testament to Trakh’s philosophy of taking advantage of turnovers.“[My philosophy first comes from] our defense, we do a good job of forcing turnovers,” Trakh said. “I expect that to continue, we have some kids who can defend and I expect that to continue.”With only two games under their belt, the Trojans have shown what they are capable of, having outscored opponents 159-105 so far.Freshman guard Justina King led Long Beach State with 12 points and five assists in 39 minutes of play. Junior guard Sydney Bordonaro led all bench players for the 49ers, scoring 12 points on two 3-pointers and four free throws in 15 minutes.The Trojans look to extend their undefeated record when they return to Galen Center for two home games. They will face UC Santa Barbara Thursday at 7 p.m., and Santa Clara University Sunday at 2 p.m.last_img read more