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Neil Young and Promise Of The Real Perform ‘Old Man’ Together For First Time [Watch]

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first_imgEdit this setlist | More Neil Young + Promise of the Real setlists[H/T – JamBase] Neil Young continued his current European tour with current backing band Promise of the Real on Thursday night with a performance at AccorHotels Arena in Paris, France. Promise of the Real, which includes Willie Nelson‘s sons Lukas and Micha Nelson, has been touring with Young since last year in support of their collaborative 2015 album The Monsanto Years, their third studio album and Young’s thirty-sixth.While Young had performed his hit song “Old Man” a handful of times on this tour during the solo portion of the performances, Thursday’s show was highlighted by the first live rendition of the song by Young with the full support of Promise of the Real. The band also tackled “Like An Inca” (from Young’s 1982 album Trans) in the encore slot, laying into the band with tight improv for just its second outing since 1982. You can watch fan-shot video of “Old Man” and “Like An Inca” from the Paris show below, courtesy of YouTube users Gerard Rallo and Jean-Paul Pelicant:“Old Man”:“Like An Inca” encore:last_img read more

In last semester, ‘Last Lectures’

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first_imgFormer U.S. Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter will deliver official words of wisdom to the Class of 2010 next month at Commencement. Until then, a new “Last Lecture” series organized by the Senior Class Committee is giving College seniors a less formal venue for parting words of inspiration from some favorite professors.“With just eight semesters here at Harvard, many of us have not had the chance to hear from all the tremendous professors in Harvard’s faculty, or to dig into all the topics we’d hoped to during college,” said senior Ami Nash, a marshal for the Class of 2010. “We hope this series can help in introducing the Class of 2010 to some of Harvard’s most fascinating thinkers.”The “Last Lecture” series kicked off Thursday (April 1) with a talk by Nicholas Christakis, professor of medical sociology and medicine at Harvard Medical School, professor of sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and master of Pforzheimer House.Christakis spoke to a full Lowell Junior Common Room on his study of the spread of behaviors through social networks, framing some of his research themes as advice to the graduating seniors as they prepare to head into the world.“Your thoughts and your feelings and your body depend on those around you,” he said. “As you better yourself, that betterment can ripple out to hundreds or even thousands of other people.“Good things are required for social networks to flourish,” he added, referring to his findings that beneficial attributes such as happiness and altruism, as well as positive behaviors such as voting and exercising, can spread through social networks.Christakis told the assembled students that 70 percent of them will end up marrying someone within three degrees of themselves in their social network.“Your social network will fold up around you and, like a yenta, introduce you to one another,” he said.Nash says the “Last Lecture” speakers are faculty identified by graduating seniors as formative in their college careers. More lectures will take place on upcoming Thursdays, and are free and open to the Harvard community.Speakers in the “Last Lecture” series include: David Charbonneau, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Astronomy, April 8, 5:30 p.m., location to be announced.Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History and Professor of Business Administration and William Ziegler Professor of Business Administration, April 15, 5:30 p.m., Lowell Junior Common Room.Steven Levitsky, professor of government, April 29, 5:30 p.m., Winthrop Junior Common Room.Judith Palfrey, T. Berry Brazelton Professor of Pediatrics and master of Adams House, May 6, 5:30 p.m., location to be announced.For more information.last_img read more

Safe chicken

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first_imgSeparate raw meat from cookedor ready-to-eat foods.Don’t use the same cuttingboard or knife for raw poultry and other foods.Don’t handle raw and cookedfoods without washing your hands thoroughly in between.Wash your hands, too, after handling frozen or thawed chicken oreggs. Wash your hands with warm, running water and soap for atleast 20 seconds, rubbing them together and rinsing thoroughly.Don’t put cooked meat backonto a plate or surface with raw meat juices.Don’t use raw or soft-cookedeggs in food preparations that won’t be heat-treated orcooked.Keep surfaces clean.Thoroughly wash surfaces, plates or utensils that have come intocontact with raw meat.Use a thermometer. Again, cookpoultry pieces to 170 and whole birds to 180. You can’t tell bylooks if the meat is properly done. It’s important to use a meatthermometer. By Helen CarterUniversity of GeorgiaYou may be asking yourself, “With all this talk about bird flu,is it safe for me to handle and eat chicken?”In University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offices across thestate, that’s the question agents are answering most often thesedays.Recent media coverage of avian influenza, or bird flu, hasconsumers questioning the safety of poultry. To date, theguidelines for safely handling and cooking chicken haven’tchanged.The World Health Organization still says that no epidemiologicalinformation suggests that anyone has been infected through eatingwell-cooked, contaminated poultry meat. WHO also says there’s noevidence that products shipped from affected areas have been thesource of infection in humans.Proper cookingNormal cooking to the recommended temperatures (170 degreesFahrenheit for poultry pieces and 180 for whole birds) willinactivate the viruses if they’re present. Other guidelines: To learn more about this or other food topics, contact your localUGA Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.(Helen Carter is the University of Georgia CooperativeExtension County Coordinator in Pike County, Ga.)last_img read more

Andrew White makes splash with 24 points in exhibition against Le Moyne

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first_imgWhen the media convened to meet Syracuse for the first time in the 2016-17 season, television cameras and microphones took aim at Andrew White. Everyone wanted to know more about the fifth-year senior out of Nebraska.The 6-foot-7 guard finished second on his team with 16.6 points per game last year and was expected to bandage the loss of SU’s three best shooters last year. So, reporters asked, what was his plan to do that?“We’ll see, we’ll see,” White said at SU’s media day on Oct. 21. “I don’t like to talk a whole lot.“With games coming up here in the next two or three weeks, the world will see.”The Carrier Dome finally laid eyes on White last week against Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and his 2-for-9 shooting performance was nothing to gloat about. But in White’s second exhibition with the Orange, a 97-64 win over Le Moyne, SU fans, at least, finally did see. White led the Orange with 24 points and a 6-for-10 night from 3.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt was a promising performance with Friday’s season-opener looming, but it was an essential performance with Tyler Lydon dropping in eight points (only two in the first half). They’re the duo that will be leaned on to drive the offense, and in a meaningless exhibition, it didn’t matter that White provided the only fuel.“When the game starts, you want to start on a good note. You don’t want your bench players to have to come back from a deficit,” White said. “Tonight that was my emphasis.“I didn’t want to go down early and have it be my bad.”White didn’t hesitate to underscore his focus. After the Orange sunk to a 12-point deficit in five minutes last week against IUP, the veteran guard converted on an open 3 in SU’s first possession. There would be no early sinkhole Tuesday night. Instead in the opening five minutes, the starters staked themselves to an 11-3 lead.SU’s starters seemed to have a much better grasp on their game plan after they played flustered and disoriented themselves in a man-to-man defense. The Orange didn’t break out man-to-man on Tuesday, but unleashed the press with 12:30 remaining in the first half. The aggressive defense led to White’s brightest moment without the ball starting in his hands.Just after hitting a step-in 3 to give Syracuse a 27-13 lead, White jolted into the press and poached Le Moyne’s inbound pass. He muscled his way under the basket and poured in an and-one layup to push the lead further out of the Dolphins’ reach.“Andrew showed tonight how effective he can be shooting the basketball,” Jim Boeheim said. “He didn’t have a lot of time and he still knocked those shots down.”Le Moyne’s Tanner Hyland did his best to nullify White’s 19 first-half points, blanketing SU fans with memories of a 2009 Le Moyne exhibition win in the Carrier Dome. Hyland shot and converted five 3s in the final five minutes of the first half, drawing Le Moyne within seven at one juncture.But there was White, ready to counter with a 3-point contest of his own. In the face of C.J. Asuncion-Byrd, White shook off the 6-foot-3 guard near the top of the key and converted from 3. He hit twice more in the final three minutes to give Syracuse a nine-point lead at the half.“He’s the best shooter on the team,” freshman guard Taurean Thompson said. “… Every time he misses is a surprise.”There weren’t many unexpected turns to Tuesday’s trouncing. SU never looked back in the second half, outscoring the Dolphins by 24 in the final 20 minutes. White spent the final chunk of minutes on the bench, cheering a walk-on filled lineup.As expected with the mild-mannered White, he didn’t yell or celebrate as jubilantly as his counterparts. He remained more stoic, digesting the 26-minute showcase he just displayed. Even though it took him a second try, White unveiled the player he was reluctant to talk about three weeks prior. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 9, 2016 at 3:56 am Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossmanlast_img read more

Daniel Agyei sure of Cairo Victory despite volatile situation

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first_imgBlack Stars returnee goalie Daniel Agyei has allayed the fears of Ghanaians ahead of their return-leg World Cup play-off against Egypt in Cairo on November 19.He revealed in an interview from his South Africa base that FIFA’s decision to sanction the game at the Air Defense Stadium would not shift their focus.Gyan believed the venue, coupled with the mouthwatering $1m each financial package promised their opponents, had urged them on to play as though they have no feather in their cup.The Free State safe pair of  hands mentioned,despite his absence in the team’s emphatic win will have the tendency to make them complacent, which was common to humans.But he indicated that FIFA’s failure to shift the venue upon request by the Ghana Football Association (GFA) due to the security situation in the country, will give him and his colleagues a different mindset ahead of the clash.“We have come too far to miss the Brazil 2014 World Cup bus. We don’t want to miss it, we are determined to give our best shot, and that alone is enough motivation to conquer them at their own backyard. Ghanaians should relax and continue to pray for us for a good day. We won’t disappoint them. “My current form in the PSL in South Africa made me gained  a call up into the team and when given the  opportunity Ghanaians will see an improved Daniel Agyei”. he addedFIFA turned down Ghana’s appeal for a change of venue for the return leg due to the political tension in Cairo.The world football governing body has approved the Air Defense Stadium for the November 19 clash, stating that the CAF Champions League clash involving Al-Ahly and Orlando Pirates scheduled for the same venue on November 10 suggests it is safe for the Word Cup play-off.Ghana handed their Egyptian counterparts a 6-1 thrashing in the first leg at the Baba Yara Stadium in Kumasi on October 15.last_img read more