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All-Star Tributes To Jerry Garcia & Dr. John To Be Released On CD/DVD

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first_imgLast year marked the beginning of a new and exciting tradition, as all-star tribute concerts popped up across the country for a number of beloved artists. Put on by the group Blackbird Presents, tributes to Jerry Garcia, Dr. John and Emmylou Harris captured the imaginations of musicians everywhere, and entranced fans with creative interpretations of legendary songs.Today we’ve learned that all three of those tributes will be released on CD and DVD, though the dates of these releases have yet to be revealed. The Dear Jerry tribute was easily one of the most exciting evenings of music, with all four surviving members of the Grateful Dead on hand, as well as performances from Widespread Panic, moe., Bruce Hornsby, Grace Potter, Jimmy Cliff, David Grisman, Jorma Kaukonen, Railroad Earth, The Disco Biscuits and more. For more about the releases, head to Blackbird’s website. You can also relive “Dear Jerry” through Erik Kabik’s photo gallery below: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

HKS students win public service innovation award

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first_imgA team of Harvard Kennedy School students that founded an international social development organization has won the 2012 Accenture Public Service Innovation Award at the Harvard Innovation Challenge. The award is intended to encourage Harvard students to “apply their creative energy to solve pressing public sector challenges and to foster the next generation of government solutions and leaders.”Michael Belinsky, David Bullon, Michael Eddy, Avnish Gungadurdoss, and Madalina Pruna were honored for their vision in creating Instiglio, an organization designed to help governments apply social impact bonds to developing countries. Social impact bonds are a relatively new concept that facilitates private investment for the provision of public services. This concept is being piloted in England and has received initial support in the U.S., but has not yet caught on in developing countries.“We founded Instiglio with the mission of empowering societies to discover, adopt and scale innovative solutions to social problems,” said Belinsky. “Our team united over an opportunity to improve drastically the delivery of social services in developing countries by adapting the social impact bond model to emerging markets. We are thrilled to combine our Kennedy school training and our development world experience (our team has collectively worked in over 20 countries) to durably improve social service delivery. ”Rey Faustino was awarded honorable mention for his education nonprofit, OneDegree. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Jonathan Slinger Tapped to Play Willy Wonka in West End

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first_imgJust the golden ticket! Jonathan Slinger will play Willy Wonka in the West End’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He will begin performances on May 4, taking over from Alex Jennings at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane. Directed by Sam Mendes, the tuner features a book by David Greig and music and lyrics by Tony winners Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman. Slinger’s extensive stage credits include Hamlet, Macbeth, Richard II, Richard III, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, The Comedy of Errors, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Power, The Duchess of Malfi, The Coast of Utopia, Yes, Prime Minister, Uncle Vanya and Urinetown. The West End production officially opened on July 25, 2013, starring Tony and Olivier Award winner Douglas Hodge as Willy Wonka. Based on Roald Dahl’s 1964 children’s book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory follows the adventures of young Charlie Bucket as he and four other children win golden tickets to visit the strange and eccentric world of Willy Wonka and his chocolate factory. The book was first adapted to the big screen in 1971 under the title Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, starring Gene Wilder. In 2005, Tim Burton directed a remake using the novel’s original title, with Johnny Depp playing Wonka. View Commentslast_img read more

ESA takes on campus sustainability efforts

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first_imgIn the face of one of the worst droughts on record, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti issued an executive directive challenging the city to reduce its water use by 20 percent over the next two and a half years. The severity of current environmental issues, both water-related and otherwise, has not escaped the notice of the USC community. On campus, students are working to shift campus culture and university policy to become more sustainability-focused.The Environmental Student Assembly, which was formed last spring as a division of Program Board, is attempting to give a voice to individuals and groups on campus who are invested in environmental issues. Laura Walsh (left), a senior majoring in environmental studies, participates in the Environmental Student Assembly’s Green Awareness Fair on McCarthy Quad. — Daily Trojan File PhotoESA Executive Director Shawn Rhoads said that prior to ESA’s formation, there was a disconnect between like-minded environmental groups on campus.“There were these environmental organizations, but they didn’t know about each other. They didn’t really communicate with each other,” Rhoads said. “Two [organizations] were working on the same campaign at the same time, but they didn’t really know.”Since its founding, ESA has fostered communication and collaboration between its 15 member organizations that are devoted to various environmental issues and has held several events related to those issues, including film screenings and events featuring speakers such as former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and actor Ian Somerhalder. ESA also co-hosted the Homecoming Rally and Carnival earlier this month, during which students powered the stage with bicycles. The Office of Sustainability’s Sustainability Program Manager Halli Bovia noted that campus culture regarding sustainability has improved during her three years at USC.“We’re beginning to see a culture shift with the students, [including] the establishment of the Environmental Student Assembly,” Bovia said. “That’s been great.”ESA originated in the Office of Sustainability, and the two entities have maintained a close partnership. Bovia highlighted the importance of this relationship, particularly since each can provide specific resources and support to the other.“It’s so important to support students and their efforts in this area because we will never be able to do enough,” Bovia said. “ESA’s focus is really on environmental events for students. I think that’s fabulous [because the Office of Sustainability doesn’t] have the resources to put on events.”Despite ESA’s founding and the increase of environmentally focused events, however, USC still seems to lag behind many other campuses in terms of sustainability. Daniel Redick, ESA’s external membership director and co-founder of national sustainability nonprofit Green Student Fund, attended two other colleges before transferring to USC and said he noticed a marked difference when he arrived on campus.“The culture shift away from sustainability on campus when I got to USC was pretty amazing,” Redick said. “My first two colleges, Northern Arizona [University] and Santa Monica College, are very rooted in sustainable agendas and different environmental initiatives, while USC was not so much.”Both Rhoads and Redick cited lack of support from the administration as a major obstacle to achieving a more sustainable USC.“Getting USC to actually consider the environmental issues that are prevalent on campus … It definitely hasn’t been easy,” Rhoads said. “Sometimes it’s very hard to get administration on the same page.”Vice Provost for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry responded to this by saying that Bovia, as well as USC Environmental Health & Safety Executive Director Dr. James Gibson, are two of the university’s administrators who are involved in promoting student sustainability efforts. “Over the years, [a sustainability] task force has launched a number of initiatives through student input,” Carry said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “The administration works hard to listen to student input from multiple venues — student government, student organizations, residence life. We appreciate student input and carefully consider ideas when they are brought forth.”Rhoads specifically emphasized the necessity of greater support from the administration in terms of water conservation and recycling initiatives. He cited the need to decrease water usage in campus fountains and sprinkler systems, as well as the problematic aspects of USC’s current single-stream waste management system, in which all recyclable materials are mixed together instead of sorted by type.“USC recycles, but it’s all single-stream,” Rhoads said, referring to the fact that the university employs third-party company Athens Services to sort out recyclables from the waste. “When that happens, where’s the conscious effort of USC students actually recycling? There’s no awareness.” Rhoads also noted that in single-stream waste management systems like the one USC uses, recyclables are often soiled by trash and are then no longer able to be recycled.On-campus recycling is one initiative that is at the forefront of environmental efforts at other universities. At the University of California, Los Angeles, for example, there is an approximately one-to-one ratio of trash cans to recycling bins both on campus and in the university’s residential community. Kyle Hess, co-chair of UCLA’s largest sustainability organization, E3: Ecology, Economy, Equity, notes that his university’s emphasis on environmental research has enabled more effective sustainability on campus. Hess said UCLA has an initiative to become waste-free by 2020. “There was a recycling team that conducted a waste audit on campus to see the recycling habits of students,” Hess said. “Based on their research they designed a plan of where recycling bins should be located on campus … and they also designed a new bin and signage so that it would show people exactly what can be recycled versus what should be trashed or composted.”Hess said that E3 has recently started an E-waste initiative on campus, providing bins and encouraging students to properly dispose of their electronic waste to make UCLA’s campus even more environmentally friendly. UCLA’s sustainability initiatives have received accolades from such entities as the Sierra Club, the Princeton Review and the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Though USC might not measure up to other campuses in regards to environmental issues yet, both Rhoads and Redick are optimistic about the future of sustainability on campus. Rhoads said that as the assembly continues to grow, students invested in environmental issues will have more opportunities to affect  change on campus. “It’s been very rewarding to have these students in our assembly be extremely passionate about something and ESA being able to support them and serve as their resource,” Rhoads said.Redick also believes that continued efforts to communicate effectively with university administration can improve sustainability on campus.“I think showing administration … how much that sustainable culture has been growing is huge because I think the administration is going to want to reflect its students as well as possible,” Redick said.last_img read more

Lakers win slugfest over Clippers in NBA restart to charge out of the hiatus

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first_img“That spirit, that fight, whatever you want to do to try to help,” James said. “Even if you’re not shooting the ball good, being able to do things. You can always help in other ways, whether your voice or a defensive stop, or just your presence. That’s what’s fun about the game.”Much of the scene would have been difficult to explain to the NBA fans of a year ago: The digital walls of the arena projecting virtual fans in front of billowing black curtains; both teams kneeling together with referees during the national anthem in front of “BLACK LIVES MATTER” emblazoned on the court; jersey names replaced by slogans like “EQUALITY” and “HOW MANY MORE”; the legion of masked workers shuffling around a court with spaced-out seats instead of straight line team benches.But within the bounds of the court, a sense of normalcy took hold: the sneaker squeaks, the defensive call outs. And the familiarity — and fierce competitiveness — between the teams gave the game a comforting sense of gravitas.There were moments like Leonard, lining up hungrily against a defending James, waving off a screen to try to take him one-on-one. There was Green, drawing offensive fouls and popping back up from the court with a rakish grin as if he had just swiped the cookie jar clean. There was Pat Beverley, fresh out of quarantine, leaping wildly into the air while arguing to an official that he shouldn’t have been assessed a foul because, “It was all ball!”As lively as the action was, it lacked a definitive flow. The teams racked up a combined 57 fouls. Two early whistles kept Leonard on the bench for much of the first quarter as the Lakers built a 13-point lead, but the Clipper forward’s mechanical efficiency — and ability to get to the line — slowly erased that gap until the Lakers were looking at a double-digit deficit in the third quarter.The Clippers were boosted by Leonard’s consistency at the line and 3-point shooting driven by George and late arrival Patrick Beverley. But the biggest change, George thought, was that the team tried to do more dictating.“The game was a little out of hand to start off. But (the Lakers) were the aggressors,” George said. “They attacked us defensively. They pressured us.Second half we came out and I thought we attacked more.”Davis’ monstrous effort helped salvage the Lakers, as the forward got to the line more than anyone else in the game and went 16 for 17. By the end of the third quarter, Davis had 22 points more than anyone else on his own team.When James checked back in at the start of the fourth, he shelved his rusty jumper for playmaking, helping complete a 17-3 run that Davis started and setting the stage for another close finish that’s been common between these teams this year.The saga of the fourth battle of Los Angeles tells the story of 2020, a year of unpredictable upheaval and blunt force emotional trauma. The Lakers and Clippers were originally scheduled to play on Jan. 28, but the game was postponed after Kobe Bryant was one of nine who died in a helicopter crash in Calabasas. The game was rescheduled for April 9, but then was swept away with the rest of the NBA schedule when the league went on hiatus on March 11.The fact that the game was even played at all — 184 days after it was first scheduled — felt miraculous in retrospect.While the previous games played out in front of raucous Staples Center crowds, a bubble crowd of mere hundreds showed out. But rather than the cream of Los Angeles’ rich and famous in courtside seats, it was basketball’s elite: Chris Paul, Carmelo Anthony, Damian Lillard, DeMar DeRozan and C.J. McCollum among them. It made sense: With sparse nightlife in the bubble, why not see the first official NBA games staged in four-and-a-half months?“The environment was great,” Doc Rivers said. “You could tell, both teams were into it. I thought the NBA did as much as they could with crowd noise and all that, but at the end of the day, it’s a competition and you could feel that out on the floor.”There’s plenty for each L.A. power to work out.The Clippers need their full strength, with Lou Williams in quarantine through at least the first two games and Montrezl Harrell still attending to a personal matter. Having two leading candidates for Sixth Man of the Year back in the fold to erase that margin must have passed through the mind of team owner Steve Ballmer, who watched from a higher vantage than normal with a sheet of plexiglass separating him from his team.The Dion Waiters experiment had strong early returns for the Lakers, with 11 points, second only to Kyle Kuzma’s 16 points off the bench. The duo helped spur the second unit and the 8 for 19 finish from behind the arc. But Frank Vogel said a lot has to get better before the Lakers are playoff ready.The intensity of the game was grounding and familiar — even if everything else wasn’t. Back in March after the third installment, Davis told reporters that the Clippers battles had been “the type of games you live for” and would shape up to be a great playoff series if it every comes down to the franchises meeting for the first time in postseason history. Now in July, in a season unlike any before it, Davis didn’t think all that much had changed.“It still felt like a game back in Staples,” he said. “Always physical, it was gritty. Guys who were getting after it, competing on both ends of the floor on both teams. And that’s what makes it fun.”Related Articles Anthony Davis (34 points) and Leonard (28 points) powered much of their teams’ respective efforts, while George (30 points) came on late. James was undoubtedly rusty, just 6 for 19, but late he contested baskets and a stalwart defensive effort made the difference in the key stretch at the finish.The final sequences reminded the basketball world why an all-L.A. series would be a Western Conference Finals dream.Under the two-minute mark, George knocked down a corner three on a dish from Leonard to narrow it to a one-point game. In response, James drove into the lane for a contested lay-up. George tied it up with a three over Danny Green, flexing with both arms.James answered again with two points off a putback, screaming for the foul but regaining the lead.James said last week that getting his competitive juices flowing was the thing he missed the most. Thursday night’s game was the kind of thing he had in mind. Photos: Lakers defeat Trail Blazers in Game 4 of first-round playoff series On Mamba Night, the Lakers make short work of Blazers to take 3-1 series lead LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — From the night this NBA season began, to the night it began again, the Lakers-Clippers has carried the feel of a heavyweight bout.In March, each team seemed trim, limber, ready to contend. After a hiatus unlike any in the sport’s history at four-and-a-half months long, the Lakers and Clippers felt ungainly and awkward with lurching stops and starts — two fighters not quite in their primes, still circling and feeling one another out.PreviousThe Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers wear Black Lives Matter shirts and kneel during the national anthem prior to an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma (0) is defended by Los Angeles Clippers’ Amir Coffey (7) during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) makes a shot against the Los Angeles Clippers during the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers’ Anthony Davis, top, looks to pass against Los Angeles Clippers’ Patrick Patterson (54) during the third quarter oof an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, right, shoots against Los Angeles Clippers’ Reggie Jackson, left, during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) celebrates with his teammates after they defeated the Los Angeles Clippers in an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James stands on the court during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, right, collides with Los Angeles Clippers Reggie Jackson, left, during an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Clippers’ Kawhi Leonard looks to shoot against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ JR Smith (21) and Dwight Howard (39) look for a rebound against the Los Angeles Clippers during the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) looks on during a break in play against the Los Angeles Clippers during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Clippers’ Marcus Morris Sr. (31) shoots against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers Anthony Davis (3) and LeBron James (23) high-five during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James, right, slaps hands with a teammate prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) talks with Los Angeles Clippers’ Kawhi Leonard (2) during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James, second from left, wears a Black Lives Matter shirt and kneels with teammates during the national anthem prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Imagesvia AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakes’ Anthony Davis warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)A United States flag hangs above the court with Black Lives Matter written above the NBA logo at center court prior to an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James wears a Black Lives Matter shirt as he points up and kneels with teammates during the national anthem prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James wears a Black Lives Matter shirt as he takes to the court prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James takes to the court prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020 in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James takes to the court prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020 in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)A general view of the court with Black Lives Matter written above the NBA logo is seen at center court prior to an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)A general view of the court with Black Lives Matter written above the NBA logo is seen at center court prior to an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Clippers’ Joakim Noah warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ Dwight Howard warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ Dwight Howard warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Clippers’ Joakim Noah warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Players engage in warmups prior to an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Clippers’ Kawhi Leonard warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ JR Smith warms up prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James, second from left, wears a Black Lives Matter shirt and kneels with teammates during the national anthem prior to an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Imagesvia AP, Pool)The Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers wear Black Lives Matter shirts and kneel during the national anthem prior to an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images via AP, Pool)Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma (0) is defended by Los Angeles Clippers’ Amir Coffey (7) during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)NextShow Caption1 of 32Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma (0) is defended by Los Angeles Clippers’ Amir Coffey (7) during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP)ExpandBut what LeBron James in particular lacked in finesse, he finished off a 103-101 Lakers win (50-14) with pure will, sliding in front of Clippers stars Kawhi Leonard and Paul George on the same possession to force up an errant final shot.The 35-year-old Lakers star walked off cooly as the buzzer sounded, giving his Lakers a 2-2 season tie with their rivals in a season that’s taken longer than any other in NBA history. Video: What LeBron James said about Jacob Blake … ‘Black people in America are scared’ Chris Paul, Russell Westbrook and other NBA stars pay tribute to Kobe Bryant For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more