qvmoqvqh

New trigonoid bivalves from the Albian (Early Cretaceous) of Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula: systematics, paleoecology, and austral Cretaceous paleobiogeography

Posted on

first_imgNewly discovered trigonioid bivalves are systematically described from the Late Albian of the Fossil Bluff Group of Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula. The fauna includes Nototrigonia (Nototrigonia) ponticula Skwarko, N. (Callitrigonia) offsetensis n. sp., Eselaevitrigonia macdonaldi n. sp., Pterotrigonia (Pisotrigonia) capricornia (Skwarko), and Pacitrigonia praenuntians n. sp. It represents the first Albian trigonioid fauna described from the Antarctic. It is also the first published record of the Nototrigoniinae (excluding Pacitrigonia) outside Australasia. Paleoecologically, this fauna represents the shallowest and highest energy molluscan assemblage from the Fossil Bluff Group and occurs near the base of a significant transgressive unit, the Mars Glacier Member of the Neptune Glacier Formation. The paleogeography of Austral Cretaceous trigonioids is reviewed. Endemic centers are identified in India–east Africa, southern South America, and Australasia. Only one trigonioid genus, Pacitrigonia, had its origin in the Antarctic. During the earliest Cretaceous, cosmopolitan trigonioid genera occurred in Antarctica. In the mid-Cretaceous faunal similarity of Antarctica with Australasia was strong, and in the latest Cretaceous affinity with southern South America increased.last_img read more

Lecturer – Construction Management – (ADJ000015)

Posted on

The Construction Management Department at the University of Houstonoffers a broad range of undergraduate level courses in ConstructionManagement and occasionally has openings for part-time Lecturers toteach courses throughout the academic year. The University ofHouston, with one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation,seeks to recruit and retain a diverse community of scholars.Interested and qualified candidates are invited to apply totemporary, part time positions. Lecturer appointments are made on asemester basis.Please indicate the course that you are interested in teaching.Areas that commonly need lecturers include: Construction managementCapstone coursesEquipment, materials, and testingEstimating, scheduling, project controlContract, legal aspect, and safetyGraphics and surveyingSoil, steel, and timber construction The University of Houston is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction institution. Minorities, women, veterans and persons withdisabilities are encouraged to apply.Qualifications :M.S. degree in engineering/construction or a closely related fieldwith relevant industrial experience are required.Ph.D degree in engineering/construction are preferred.Notes to Applicant: Official transcripts are required for afaculty appointment and will be requested upon selection of finalcandidate. All positions at the University of Houston are securitysensitive and will require a criminal history check. read more

St Hilda’s JCR tries to prevent ‘Prevent’

Posted on

first_imgSt Hilda’s College JCR passed a motion seeking to “boycott Prevent” earlier this week.The Counter Terrorism and Security Act (2015) requires universities to implement ‘Prevent Duty’, a series of measures designed to ensure “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”.Oxford will have to be fully compliant with Prevent by August this year; the Higher Education and Funding Council for England has been given responsibility to monitor how the been given responsibility to monitor how the University has met the new counter-terrorism.The motion, proposed by the JCR President and seconded by the St Hilda’s student BME officer, mandates JCR officers “not to co-operate with the Prevent strategy” and to “boycott it as far as legally possible”.The JCR has also committed to “lobby the College to be completely open and transparent about how it is engaging with Prevent” by providing the JCR with access to the publications used to train staff and students to spot potentially radicalised individuals, as well as to hold consultations within the student body.Hilda’s JCR president, Mollie MacGinty, argued that “the act further criminalises Muslims and black people,” and raised concerns that the concepts of ‘extremism’ and ‘radicalism’ are “ill defined and open to abuse for political ends”.The Oxford University Student Union passed a similar motion in October last year to “not cooperate with the [government’s] Prevent strategy”. In February 2015, over 500 academics signed an open letter condemning the Counter Terrorism and Security Act when it received Royal Assent, declaring that it remains “a threat to freedom of speech at universities.”Aliya Yule, third year undergraduate at Wadham and the proposer of the OUSU motion last year, told Cherwell , “The new Prevent legislation (2015) poses a huge threat to all students, but in particular Muslim and BME students. “Most notably, plans to implement the legislation include monitoring prayer rooms and religious facilities, having welfare staff , including JCR and MCR Welfare Offi cers, trained to look out for signs of ‘extremism’, and stopping people speaking whose views could be deemed problematic. In a climate of increasing Islamophobia, and in a university where 60 per cent of BME students feel “The Prevent legislation poses a huge threat to all students”unwelcome or uncomfortable on account of their race or ethnicity, Prevent will have a hugely negative impact on Muslim and BME students.”Yussef Robinson, who is the BME officer at St Hilda’s and who seconded the motion, said, “Our Counselling Service will now be trained and required to report on ‘suspicious’ students. This is inherently awful and it will further marginalise BME students at the University; we will now feel less comfortable approaching the counselling service. I would have been far less able to have an effective discussion in my counselling sessions if I thought my words might be reported back to the state.”last_img read more

Widespread Panic Performs In Olympic Caliber To Commence Celebrations In Birmingham [Videos]

Posted on

first_imgRock and roll titans Widespread Panic returned to stage last night at the Legacy Arena in the Birmingham Jefferson Convention Complex, known to many as simply the B.J.C.C. The six-piece powerhouse band appeared to be refreshed after their four-night run in Mexico, with hints of twinkling eyes and a reddened skin color from the week spent under the tropical sun. However, it seems they swapped out the tequila for whiskey as they began an unusually gritty night of music to represent the deep south with badass veterans-of-the-blues swagger.They began the first set of the two-night run with a kickin’ version of their original tune, “Pleas”, in which JB [John Bell] implored to “Don’t let it get too sad (and later don’t let it get too dark),” possibly in reference to the recent horrific school shooting in Parkland, Florida. Just as “Pleas” opened the 1993 album Everyday, it commenced last night’s show as well. Jimmy Herring destroyed a guitar solo before segueing into a cover of Bloodkin’s “Makes Sense to Me.” Danny Hutchens’ song describes three everyday tales of social injustice, in which the singer sympathetically responds “Well, makes sense to me.” John Bell imbued the bluesy lyrics with soul in his remarkable croak. Herring and Bell dominated until JoJo Hermann was summoned by JB with a cry of “JoJo, Go!” to play a jumpin’ organ solo.The band returned to their fourth studio album, Ain’t Life Grand, with a bass-thumpin’ rendition of “Little Kin”. The original tune was only played twice last year, and the boys nailed this top-notch version. Jimmy Herring crafted a masterful solo around Dave Schools’ pulsating bass line. John Bell blended his swampy voice into the mix while Schools added his own take on backup vocals. The song faded off to the lingering notes of Jimmy Herring and JoJo Hermann and a temporary silence ensued.This silence didn’t last long, however, as the boys jumped right into a scorching “Action Man.” The high intensity of this song hinted at chaotic revelry to come. “Action Man”, from their seventh studio album Don’t Tell the Band, was written about horse racing, specifically Triple Crown winner War Admiral and his elite sire, Man O’ War.  Herring, JoJo, and John Bell danced methodically around the heavy drums and bass rhythms provided by Duane Trucks, Sonny Ortiz, and Dave Schools. Sonny, Schools, and Trucks stood out in this driving rhythmic barrage.JoJo Hermann led the band through two songs with his keyboard talents on full display. A jovial “Street Dogs for Breakfast” from their last studio album with the same name epitomized JoJo Hermann’s casual barroom vocals and honky-tonk piano playing. Hermann kept the conducting baton to direct the band through a rarely played version of a brilliant cover of “Red Beans” popularized by Muddy Waters and Professor Longhair. Widespread Panic last played the song at St. Augustine Amphitheatre in 2016. With assistance from Dave Schools, JoJo paid tribute to Professor Longhair, the blues piano legend from New Orleans, and brought a taste of swampy funk to Alabama.The band kept the crowd on their feet all night and followed up with a cuttin’ “All Time Low” from the album Til’ the Medicine Takes. John Bell and JoJo Hermann both crushed the vocals, but at some point, Jimmy Herring took the metaphorical wheel of Doc Brown’s DeLorean and, much like Elon Musk’s “Starman” in the driver seat of the interstellar Tesla Roadster, brought the music to galactic proportions. For a wizard with powers over time and space, the first step into overdrive was a cinch for Jimmy Herring. He began lightly playing in the background behind John Bell and JoJo Hermann’s vocals, but soon he accelerated past lightspeed and the masterful band embraced his fluid tempo changes. Dave Schools took over the helm of the ship and coordinated with the percussionists through a transitional jam while the formidable Jimmy Herring worked his guitar wizardry throughout intergalactic realms. These between-song improvisational jams consistently proved the incomparable skill of Widespread Panic, and this particular build-up exploded into one of the highlights of the night.Widespread broke it down for a sentimental “Space Wrangler”, a beautiful tribute to late founding member Michael “Mikey” Houser. This version was executed flawlessly with a sweet solo by the patient and wise Jimmy Herring and included several perfectly synchronized tempo breakdowns and progressions. JoJo Hermann and Jimmy Herring worked together to interlay melodies while Schools pummeled his bass unmercifully. To finish the first set, the band returned to the swamps with a raunchy cover of Calvin Carter and Bobby Rush’s “Bowlegged Woman”, which was later popularized by Hot Tuna. The band annihilated this erotically suggestive tune with smoking parts by the omnipresent Herring and steady beats provided by Dave Schools. John Bell pulled out aces from his sleeves with an unbelievable improvisational rap that warrants many re-listens, and JoJo Hermann chimed neat cascades around Bell’s erratic phrases before Panic broke it down one last time for a final verse before they walked offstage for a set break.Widespread Panic returned to the stage to obliterate a mind-blowing version of “Greta” from Bombs & Butterflies. Dogs howled, bees swarmed, JB crooned behind JoJo’s lead vocals, and JoJo chased Jimmy Herring up and down his keyboard. The saucy tune wasn’t overextended; it was direct and straight-to-the-point. The band transitioned indirectly into Neil Young’s “Walk On”, but not before a heavy jam that featured teases of the Allman Brothers Band’s “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed”. Schools, Herring, and Hermann absolutely rocked out in their distinctive, badass style.“Walk On” slowed the tempo down and gave John Bell room to expand his vocal fills. Widespread continued the Neil Young theme with “Tortured Artist”, an original tune from the album Ball that has only been played once in the last four years: In it, John Bell paints a masterful depiction with the descriptive lyrics of a “tired, old cowboy who lets his horses run free” with other dirty lyrics and stinging guitar licks.The music subsided momentarily before the band delivered an energetically charged version of “Flicker” from Free Somehow. The snare drum provided a quick tempo throughout with bursts of the pure mayhem of Dave Schools. Jimmy Herring maneuvered with a heavenly brilliance while Dave Schools threatened to crush his instrument to bits with the colossal force he drove into his fretboard.The ultra-talented group of musicians executed a nearly twenty-minute old-school sandwich that surrounded “I’m Not Alone” and an improvisational jam between the two halves of “Driving Song”. A crowd-favorite sandwich brought decisive jams and heartfelt lyrics served a reminder that they are never truly alone. “Driving Song” was featured on the band’s debut album, Space Wrangler, while “I’m Not Alone” came on the subsequent album, the self-titled Widespread Panic. Jimmy Herring–as always, but especially last night–was playing perfectly and squeezed so many purposeful notes inside very small pockets of silence.A consolidated version of “Tie Your Shoes” followed. It was not as drawn out as the version from New Year’s Eve in Atlanta, still maintained an absurd amount of energy from each musician in the band. Duane Trucks and Jimmy Herring preserved musical perfection with spirited performances while JoJo Hermann splashed notes with methodological precision. Dave Schools dominated near the end and led the group into another illustrious transition jam. John Bell left the stage as JoJo, Jimmy, and Schools weave skillfully around the drummers’ percussive rhythms.Next, the rest of the band besides the percussionists left the stage, allowing the two rhythm players to vigorously duel for a solid 10 minute “Drums” jam. Sonny recently switched to a new drum kit, and he broke them in with an impressive molly-whopping. The drummers caught their breath for less than a half dozen seconds before they switched gears into a new pace as the other band members resettled into their positions.The ensuing “Diner” was extended and featured another outstanding JB rap. Schools punctuated, Hermann squealed, Herring generated lightning bolts from his deft fingers in overdrive. JB’s “Diner” rap typically describes a man waking up cold and early on a park bench and stumbling into a diner for a tepid cup of “yesterday’s coffee.” Last night’s version began with him indifferently admitting that he “couldn’t sleep anyway.. [when] a face in the window [appears]…. A friend from long ago (long, ago)… how you been? Where you been? Is there coffee yet? Still got some of yesterday’s donuts… ?[etc. etc]” John Bell repeatedly delivered the improvisational goods again and again and provided another reason to re-listen to this show many more times.Dave Schools took over lead vocal duties for his version of Vic Chestnutt’s “Sleeping Man”, which he supplied with his usual flair. The dynamically coupled bassline inexplicably intermixed with Jimmy Herring’s wizardry and JoJo’s exploratory synthesizing. They finally closed a prodigious second set with a rare cover of The Guess Who’s “No Sugar Tonight / New Mother Nature”, which they performed only once last year at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in June. Schools and Herring fought a musical battle from opposite ends of the stage while ol’ John Bell tried to navigate a treacherous position in the middle ground, avoiding bullets and shellshock alike.Widespread Panic returned to the stage to finish the night with an explosive closer. “Gimme” became the first encore with a poignant lyrical tribute to long-time friend of the band, Garrie Vareen, who passed away seven years prior. The band played deliberately and furnished the song with a very emotionally cutting tone.The boys then abandoned all sentimentality with a fiery performance of a crowd favorite, Funkadelic‘s “Red Hot Mama.” With true Prankster irony, the band typically plays “Red Hot Mama” and “Bowlegged Woman” near Valentine’s Day. Schools bestowed his heavy bass notes upon Herring’s conductive guitar prowess while John Bell’s verbal command and timing never ceased to amaze.To conclude the first night of music, the band dove headfirst into a deep jam-filled well of “Chilly Water” which was conspicuously absent from Panic en la Playa’s setlists. As to be expected, the already-enraptured audience went absolutely apeshit, and harmonious pandemonium ensued. Due to its unexpected position in the setlist, not many audience members had cups of water to throw, but even still, empty water bottles soon filled the air. The excitement persevered right until the very end of the show and left the audience drooling in anticipation of the next night of music tonight.Widespread Panic is back at the B.J.C.C. tonight for night two. For a full list of upcoming Widespread Panic shows, head to the band’s website.You can watch assorted fan-shot videos from the show below: Widespread Panic – “No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature” – 2/16/18[Video: Fred Ramadan]  Widespread Panic – “Diner” – 2/16/18[Video: Fred Ramadan] Widespread Panic – “Bowlegged Woman, Knock Kneed Man” – 2/16/18[Video: Julia Scott] Widespread Panic – “Sleeping Man” – 2/16/18[Video: Julia Scott]SETLIST: Widespread Panic | Legacy Arena @ The BJCC| Birmingham, AL | 2/16/18Set One: Pleas, Makes Sense To Me%, Little Kin, Action Man, Street Dogs For Breakfast, Red Beans*, All Time Low > Jam > Space Wrangler, Bowlegged WomanSet Two: Greta > Jam > Walk On^, Tortured Artist, Flicker, Driving Song > I’m Not Alone > Driving Song Reprise > Tie Your Shoes > Drums > Diner > Sleeping Man**, No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature^^Encore: Gimme, Red Hot Mama$, Chilly WaterNotes:%Bloodkin cover*Professor Longhair cover^Neil Young cover**Vic Chesnutt cover^^The Guess Who cover$Chilly Waterlast_img read more

An innovative oasis in Longwood will relieve city stress

Posted on

first_imgIt’s deep summer in Boston. Oppressive humidity slows you down. Sidewalks radiate heat. Droning insects and city traffic hum. Just across the courtyard from the Kresge Building of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, you happen upon a place of respite in your otherwise stressful day. The brainchild of five budding garden designers from across the University, the Countway CoLab doesn’t exist yet except on paper. But with Erika Eitland’s passion and determination, what is currently the small, hidden Countway Community Garden will someday be a flourishing multiuse community space conceived by Harvard students.Eitland, S.D. ’20, a doctoral candidate in environmental health and president of the School’s Built Environment & Health Student Consortium, first learned about the community garden soon after arriving at the Harvard Chan School. Now she is leading the effort to make the Countway CoLab — or some version of it — come to fruition. It is a place of cooling shade, lush-green, canopied by native trees. Settling in on a comfortable bench, you notice that something is missing—the nonstop urban soundtrack, thanks to the living willow fences and sound-absorbing walls.You turn to admire the murals painted by members of the local Mission Hill community and check out the handiwork of volunteer gardeners whose plantings foretell a crisp salad later in the week. Your gaze wanders over to the fresh produce at the farm stand, and you begin to envision a succulent plant-based evening meal. You notice a class by the herb beds and wonder if the students are learning about herbal medicinal treatments past and present. It’s then that you realize the stress of the day has slipped away. Spirits lifted, you text your friends to meet you at the Countway CoLab. Tucked away alongside Countway Library, behind the bicycle cage and above the rare-book stacks in the library’s Center for the History of Medicine, the current Countway Community Garden was created in 2012 by staff and faculty from Harvard Chan School and Harvard Medical School (HMS). Bounded by the library and by concrete walls, the garden features 17 raised wooden beds of various heights. Since the garden sits on pavement above the subbasement of the Countway Library, there is no soil beneath it.During spring and summer, volunteers from the three Longwood schools tend to beds of their own vegetables, herbs, and flowers. A large bed of medicinal herbs for teaching, two strawberry beds, and pots containing tomatoes, mint, chamomile, and basil are communally managed. But fecund as it may be, it’s a city garden cut off from its city—and from most of the Longwood community.In spring 2016, Eitland and her classmates discovered that the bike cage adjacent to the garden was to be moved to accommodate a new ramp connecting HMS with the Chan School—one of several projects to bring the Harvard Longwood Campus into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. “….We started focusing on the need to preserve the garden area … We realized we could harness students’ perspectives and knowledge in shaping its future.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

Sweet on Dell Technologies: How Much Time Will You Spend Today Thinking About Tomorrow?

Posted on

first_imgThis is the first installment of an ongoing series “Sweet on Dell Technologies”.At Dell Technologies, we think a lot about what’s coming next. The next IT trend that’s going to transform business and the way we do things. The next big thing that’s going to help us use data to make smarter decisions faster. The next smart machine that works in partnership with humans to solve problems. We’re always thinking about how we help our customers become digital organizations and how harnessing the transformative innovation, partnerships, and essential technology Dell Technologies provides will move them and their ideas forward. This is why we exist.Since our earliest days, Dell’s commitment to customers has driven us to innovate—propelling us from a PC company to today’s leader in differentiated capabilities across our entire portfolio – from the edge to the data center core to the cloud. We’re creating value for customers by working across our family of businesses to innovate, invest in new capabilities and deliver unique solutions they can’t get from any other technology partner.And speaking of Michael’s thoughts on who we are as a company, at one of our recent meetings, Michael said it best – the value of Dell Technologies is in the seams. You’ll find us living that out in the way we build Dell Technologies solutions that integrate superior software, hardware, services from across our portfolio, the way we leverage our world-class supply chain to advance sustainability through responsible sourcing, minimizing our footprint, and innovating with the lifecycle of resources. You’ll also see it in how we activate our sales and support teams in 170 countries to meet our customers right where they are, across the globe.Looking at our fiscal year 2019 results—where we saw double-digit revenue growth across all three business units – our Client Solutions Group Business, our Infrastructure Solutions Group Business and VMware; as well as profitable share gains across our portfolio, and leading positions across the industry—we’re driving sustainable growth.Check out this infographic that shows where we’ve come from and where we’re headed. Transforming our own company to give our customers the essential technology they need to realize their digital transformations.I hope you’ll join me at Dell Technologies World or tune in virtually at Dell Technologies World Live to learn more, and watch our keynotes and programming from the show floor. From the edge to the core to the cloud, what’s coming next will show you how REAL transformation will unlock the digital future. Let’s think about tomorrow together.last_img read more

BP holds ‘Meal or no Meal’ auction

Posted on

first_imgFor the past 25 years, the annual Breen-Phillips meal auction has allowed students to see professors, athletes and other campus celebrities in a new light by auctioning off meals with these various Notre Dame personalities. This year’s event will continue thattradition.Tonight’s “Meal or No Meal” auction will include live and silent auctions, and all proceeds from the event support Meals on Wheels, a charity that delivers meals to homebound senior citizens. Students can bid on dinners with a variety of prominent members of the Notre Dame community, such as University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, Irish football coach Brian Kelly, Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Mark Poorman, student body president Grant Schmidt and student body vice president Cynthia Weber.In addition to the live auction, a silent auction will feature gift cards from several area restaurants, including Chipotle, Olive Garden and Hot Box Pizza. It will also include six gift baskets assembled by each section of Breen-Phillips. Each will have a unique theme, such as “Death by Chocolate” and “Luck of the Irish.”In order to offer students a variety of meals to bid on, event coordinators Susan Garabedian and Adriana Taylor, both sophomores, contacted regular participants and prospective personalities via e-mail during winter break. They also asked other residents of Breen-Phillips for names of popular professors to provide a good sampling from each college, Taylor said.According to Taylor and Garabedian, the campus celebrities decide how many students to take to dinner, where they will have the meal and how much they want to spend per plate. Some participants, such as Carolyn Woo, dean of the Mendoza College of Business, and Anre Venter, professor of psychology, treat students to home-cooked, ethnic meals, while others take winners out to expensive restaurants, including Sorin’s.Poorman traditionally gives students a tour of the Main Building and the tunnels around campus. A new offering this year is a meal in Chicago with Professor Candida Moss of the Program of Liberal Studies.“Certain meals earn a lot of money because of the number of students involved, whereas others make money because the meals are expensive,” Taylor said. “It’s a good way for people to donate money to a great cause while getting to see another side of professors and other people on campus.”Garabedian said the off-campus restaurants were willing to make generous gift card donations to the event.“The donations from Chipotle are like Christmas in February,” she said.Garabedian and Taylor said they were happy about the number of new and returning  participants. “It’s very cool to see people at Notre Dame being so willing to participate in the event,” Taylor said. “It shows the amazing generosity on campus, and everyone is willing to help, from students to professors.”Professor Jim McKenna, chair of the anthropology department, and his wife, Professor Joanne Mack, traditionally take students to LaSalle Grille in South Bend for an evening of food and conversation.“We love every minute of it and the students we meet become our friends,” McKenna said. “It is just another wonderful reminder of the way Notre Dame, through its good works, helps us break the barriers between our students and us, the faculty.”Venter, who treats students to a traditional South African meal at his home, agreed with McKenna’s view of the event’s impact on student-professor relationships.“It is a great opportunity to get to know students, and we have been able to develop some wonderful relationships,” Venter said. “I think it is good for students and faculty to engage outside the constraints of the typical settings on campus.”Schmidt said he was surprised at his identification as a “campus celebrity” but nonetheless voiced his enthusiasm about the event.“Coach Kelly, Fr. Poorman, Professor McKenna and more blow us out of the water,” Schmidt said. “But we will be sure to take whoever is kind enough to bid on us to a very delicious meal and we’re looking forward to helping out.”The live and silent auctions will take place tonight from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in Burger King and the Sorin Room in LaFortune. Students may pay for meals with cash, check or the new Domer Dollars option for charity events.last_img read more

Economy minister says Slovakia to end coal-mining subsidies by 2023

Posted on

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Slovakia will phase out subsidies for coal mines supplying one of the country’s most polluting power plants from 2023, sooner than expected, Economy Minister Peter Ziga said on Monday.The Slovak government subsidizes mining at the country’s only coal company, privately owned Hornonitrianske Bane Prievidza (HBP), paying around 100 million euros ($114 million) a year, which helps maintain thousands of jobs. The company produced 1.8 million tonnes of brown coal last year, supplying the Novaky power plant in central Slovakia.The facility is operated by Slovenske Elektrarne, a utility co-owned by the state, Italy’s Enel and Czech energy group EPH. Slovenske Elektrarne said this year that extending the life of the 266-megawatt Novaky plant beyond 2023 would require significant investment.The Environment Ministry says the plant is the second-biggest carbon emitter in the country.“We will soon unveil an action plan and announce the year 2023 as the end of subsidies for the coal mines,” Ziga told reporters on the sidelines of an energy conference in Bratislava. “It does not mean they would have to close immediately. We have to work with the European Commission to show people alternatives,” he added.More: Slovakia to pull plug on coal subsidies from 2023: minister Economy minister says Slovakia to end coal-mining subsidies by 2023last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Friday, July 26

Posted on

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18 Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionMany made Music Haven what it is nowIn reference to your article on Mona Golub and Music Haven, Golub certainly deserves accolades for her successful programs offered in Schenectady’s Central Park. She has taken Music Haven beyond what was started by others so many years ago.Without taking away Golub’s well-deserved applause, we must also acknowledge those whose efforts created and made Music Haven what it was in the years before her.Once located near its current site, Music Haven was built to attract area residents to the park through its summer concerts. Back then, Music Haven played host to concerts featuring local musicians and their bands: jazz music by Nick Brignola, Polka and Dixie music by Don Nikolski, 50s and 60s classics of Freddy Randall, and Schenectady Musician’s Union members Abe Rapp, Steve Anthony, Ronnie Pidgeon, Norm Pratt, Tom Brown and others.These gifted musicians graced the Music Haven stage, packing the park lawns and seats for every performance. Let’s also remember the commitment of local restaurant owner Mike Iacobucci, whose very successful Tuesday in the Park festivals filled Music Haven with day-long entertainment.Having grown up in Schenectady, I remember the Music Haven of the early days, and it’s great to see the stage still being used to bring more people to our city. Kudos to Golub for her success, and kudos to those musicians and performers who were there in the beginning. Their music still echoes in the walls of Music Haven, as well as in our own memories.Michele A. DobskiSchenectadyLove what Rivers is doing, but lower ACI have been a customer at the Rivers casino for about two years and have seen several improvements, including complimentary drinks for table game players.My favorite attribute at Rivers are the dealers. They are the friendliest and most professional that I have experienced anywhere. Rivers is doing many things right as it shows in the excellent revenue produced. It is by far the most successful of the new New York state casinos.With all the things they are doing right, why are they trying to freeze the customers and employees? Whenever it’s hot outside and they are air-conditioning the casino, it’s way too cold in the building. If I wanted to keep customers as long as possible, I would want to make it as comfortable as possible. They are certainly not doing well in that department. Please raise the temperature.Tom SingerDelansonSt. Clare’s retirees going through hellI know the St. Clare’s pensioners are having an awful summer. I feel they are going through the worst case of abuse that anyone could ever go through. Due to the actions of the St. Clare’s Hospital, these care-givers were left to care for themselves, to live the rest of their lives with a 25% slash in their retirements or no retirement at all. We are speaking about 1,100-plus pensioners who were very loyal employee’s at St. Clare’s. These are the actual people who cared for our families. St. Clare’s was the hospital that helped all who needed it. These pensioners are living a nightmare. I don’t know how they can sleep at night. Their stress levels must be over the top. They all feel their lives have been ruined. They have been living with this agonizing problem since last year. Their retirements have still not been recovered. These are people like you and me, put in a very sad situation. Everyone knows they are deserving of their retirements, but the hospital left them no way to receive them. It’s a disgrace that they are being treated in this manner. It’s shameful. They are hurting and afraid at what is going to happen to them. No one should be treated this cruel way. This isn’t going to be settled for a long time. How long can these people go through this torture? Please say a prayer for them. They need all the help they can get.Walter “Neal” BrazellRotterdamlast_img read more

Live like a Palmer progeny for just $600 a week

Posted on

first_imgClive Palmer and son Michael in a file photo taken at Government House in Canberra. Picture: Kym Smith.MICHEAL Palmer, the son of Queensland’s richest man, never really has to work a day in his life having emerged as a bit of a property whiz.Property records show the younger Palmer – who’s in his late 20s now – has inherited his famous father Clive’s love of residential real estate, with nine homes registered in his name.He keeps them on a regular rotation on the rental circuit too, with the most recent one being in Yaroomba, north of Mt Coolum national park — one of two homes he has on the Sunshine Coast.The three bedroom, two bathroom, double car garage home, which was bought in 2006 for $895,000, was put up for rent at $600 a week. The figure was a rental drop of $130 in just eight months, showing even the Palmers were averse to shifting fortunes in the real estate market.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market20 hours agoThe property is in a gated community in Yaroomba on the Sunshine Coast. Space galore to unwind.Four of his homes are in Brisbane — a four-bedroom house in Brookfield bought for $490,000 in 1997, a three bedder in Chapel Hill that has no price on it, a four bed luxury house in Fig Tree Pocket and a three bedder in Sunnybank Hills.Three of his luxury homes were in Paradise Point on the Gold Coast, two of which were five bedders and one four bedder.The Yaroomba home that was up for rent has a stunning master suite that was described as so big it occupies the whole top floor of the property and includes a spa bath and double-sized shower.Security is so tight in the gated executive community that those approved for inspections for rental have to wait by the front gate to the complex for an escort to take them through.Key features of Mr Palmer’s rental were extra office space, air conditioning as well as ceiling fans, a modern kitchen, an open plan and large outdoor entertaining space. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more