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Waterside luxury in Essex

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first_imgHome » News » Land & New Homes » Waterside luxury in Essex previous nextLand & New HomesWaterside luxury in EssexThe Negotiator9th August 20170723 Views The historic market town of Maldon in Essex is set on the picturesque Blackwater estuary and has witnessed the third biggest rise in house prices in the UK.Properties prices in the town soared by 16.2 per cent in 2016 and it was recently voted one of the most desirable places to live in the country.Beresfords is currently marketing this new-build waterside development of five luxury townhouses at Fullbridge Quay, Maldon, which offers breathtaking views over the historic quay, amidst traditional Thames barges. More practically, it is just a short walk to smart independent shops, restaurants and cafes.Maldon, on the Blackwater estuary in Essex, was voted one of the most desirable places to live in the country!The townhouses offer spacious living accommodation over three floors with split level terrace. The properties include four double bedrooms – two with ensuite, two living room spaces and an impressive open plan kitchen/diner with bi-fold doors onto the southfacing terrace.Now ready for occupation, the townhouses are being marketed from £699,950.Neil McAninch, Branch Manager, Beresfords Maldon, says, “Maldon’s pretty and historic waterside is a big pull for people and these new developments are a major draw.This is a charming historic market town with a a heritage promenade with Thames barges and sailing boats, lots of space for families.”Maldon Beresfords waterside development Blackwater estuary Essex August 9, 2017The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Anne’s flag tension escalates

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first_imgSt Anne’s College Dean, Dr Liora Lazarus, condemned the response to Chao’s flag, although she admitted that she could see why it might have caused offence.She said, “Throwing stones at somebody for whatever political beliefs they hold is just not acceptable.“But we appreciate that there are some students in this College who do not agree with the hanging of the Tibetan flag.”One St Anne’s student, Edward Allbutt, an undergraduate in Arabic studies, described the violence that had taken place as “shocking”. He claims to have found the behaviour of some Chinese students strange. “It’s frankly bizarre that they think they can just casually complain to the authorities and so force someone to stop making a slightly controversial political statement.”Chao has expressed surprise at the controversy she has caused. She said, “I was disturbed by the reaction of the Chinese students studying in Oxford. I had expected a higher degree of open-mindedness from these people.”The College authorities claim that they do not want to intervene in this situation from any political angle and stressed that they wished to remain neutral.Lazarus stated,  “It is not the place of the College Dean to stipulate whether or not people should exercise their political rights.”“All the students are intelligent and are able to make this decision for themselves. The College respects everyone’s right to express their political belief and is certainly not taking a political stand.” To this she added, “Everyone has a right to hang up a flag should they chose to do so. At this stage we would like the students to come to a resolution on their own.”JCR President Amaru Villanueva Rance, said he supports students’ rights to express their beliefs, but added that he hoped students would be able to work through the issue without too much College interference. He said, “What we don’t want is latent animosity in College. We don’t want to cauterise debate and pretend nothing is going on. We also want to prevent the issue from snowballing.”There have been no further incidents of physical hostility from any students in St Anne’s.However Chao claims that due to the negative response, she no longer intends to remove her flag any time soon.She said, “Recent developments have placed me in a position where I cannot remove it. Chinese flags will stay up and it will legitimise their claim of being the victim in this scenario.” She added, “Some college students have even asked me to get hold of Tibetan flags, and the order is underway!”In a bid to settle the problem, Villanueva Rance said that he was willing to give time to the issue at last Sunday’s JCR meeting. “Before the meeting I mentioned that we would be talking about the flags issue. I was hoping that there would be a debate and that the students would work out a solution or a compromise.“We made reference to the situation during the meeting but it seems that no-one turned up to discuss it.”He added, “The JCR wants to protect freedom of expression and in this sense we support people’s freedom to exhibit their flags in public from their balconies.” Tensions have escalated at St Anne’s following an incident involving a student who displayed a Tibetan flag in her window.Last week third year Sophie Chau had stones thrown through her window. A number of Chinese students have now hung the Chinese flag in response to her Tibetan one.The day after the stone-throwing, carried out by three unidentified students, Chao was approached by a Chinese acquaintance in college who asked her to take down her flag. The student, who wished to remain anonymous, defended his decision. He said, “I asked Sophie if she could consider taking the flag down because we didn’t want to escalate this issue.“Hanging the ‘Snow Lion’ flag is a very serious criminal offence in China, as people perceive it as a symbol of violence. Any Chinese students would be disturbed by this flag.”Chao responded, saying that the Tibetan flag “is in no way anti-Chinese.”“The Tibetan flag is not pro-independence; it is a pro-human rights and this is not particular to China. This distinction is one that many Chinese people fail to make.”The political stand-off in St Anne’s has affected the student body, with Chao saying, “The atmosphere in College is slightly tense. My flag looks down on the Quad. It is provoking quite a bit of discussion.”One first year at St Anne’s described college atmosphere as “awkward”. She added, “Expressing political opinion is one thing, but it shouldn’t have to affect the community we all live and work in such a negative way.”last_img read more

Students condemn rise in Uni fees

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first_imgOxford students have joined the national outcry against tuition fee hikes, as OUSU followed student unions across the country in condemning a raise in payments.Over two-thirds of universities would like to charge students at least £4,000 per year, a recent survey by the BBC showed. Some universities even called for fees of up to £20,000, or for complete removal of the fee cap.The national cap on fees is due to be reviewed this year as the first cohort of students charged at the current rate graduate.National Union of Students president Wes Streeting denounced the suggestion of fee rises. “In the context of the current recession, it is extremely arrogant for university vice chancellors to be fantasising about charging their students even higher fees and plunging them into over £32,000 of debt,” he said.His views were echoed by prominent figures in OUSU. “OUSU currently opposes a lifting of the cap on tuition fees,” said OUSU President Lewis Iwu, “the student community needs to work together to ensure that our voices are heard in this crucial debate.”A facebook group calling for a petition against fee raises has gathered over 130,000 members.Lord Patten, Oxford’s Vice-Chancellor, has been a prominent voice in favour of raising the limit on fees. He recently told the Government that “such a low level” of fees was “intolerable” for University administrators.Patten said he did not feel universities should serve as engines of social mobility, accusing the government of treating them like “local social security offices.”Supporters of raising fees have pointed to a recent report by Universities UK, a group which represents the interests of University vice-chancellors. The report suggested that a rise in tuition fees up to £5,000 would not significantly affect numbers of students applying to university.Jonny Medland, OUSU’s Vice-President-Elect for Academic and Access Affairs, questioned the report’s findings, “rising tuition fees will inevitably deter students from attending many universities as they consider whether they will see enough benefits to make entering into vast sums of debt worthwhile.” Average student debt would soar to around £32,000 if tuition fees rose to £7 000, the report’s researchers predicted.The report’s compilers also note that 59% of school leavers who do not go to university cite the costs of university as a primary factor in their decision.Many Oxford students have spoken out in support of the Student Union’s opposition to any increase in fees. First-year undergraduate Carla Thomas said she felt many middle-income students might struggle to pay fees even if the poorest were supported by bursaries, saying “raising fees would hit the people in the middle hardest.”Others, however, felt an Oxford education was worth potentially higher fees. Tim Kelly, a St Anne’s law student, stated that he would be willing to pay provided the extra money was spent on improved facilities and teaching. “For an Oxbridge degree, £7 000 is definitely worth it,” he said.The NUS last week organised a mass lobby of MPs by students, demanding ministers to scrap the current system of tuition fees and student loans, and instead introduce a “graduate tax.” This would make university free at the point of entry, but would mean that graduates would pay for university out of their income.According to NUS President Wes Streeting, graduates would make “a contribution depending on how much they are benefiting financially from their own use of the system.”The University and College’s Union, which represents lecturers and academics, has strongly opposed any potential raise in fees. Secretary Sally Hunt told press, “increasing fees or the other financial barriers that so many students and parents come up against when considering university is certainly not the way to deliver a world-class university system.”She pointed to a survey showing that the majority of British citizens wanted to see tuition fees abolished, not raised.Oxford University has declined to comment on the matter, stating that “we have no established policy at the moment.”last_img read more

More Than 1,000 Tour 14th Street Fishing Pier

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first_imgThe historic Ocean City Fishing Club (OCFC) has become one of the biggest tourist attractions on the Boardwalk.Bob Dever shows visitors the sand shark he just caught during a surf-casting demonstration at the Ocean City Fishing Club’s Open House July 23. The last event of the season is Thursday, August 6, from 6-8 pm.During the club’s two-hour, July 23 Open House, a total of 1,034 men, women, and children toured the clubhouse, strolled the 635-foot fishing pier, and witnessed surf-casting demonstrations.The visitors also brought 145 pounds of non-perishable food and $60 in cash contributions for the Ocean City Ecumenical Council Community Food Cupboard. In addition, the City’s mascot, Martin Z. Mollusk, entertained children.“It was another memorable evening,” said OCFC President Augie Conte, Jr., who pointed out that the largest Open House turnout previously was last year’s figure of 727 people.“Our club members always enjoy playing host to visitors from distant places as well as locals who have never set foot on the pier before.”Founded in 1913, the club launched these popular events in 2013 as part of its Centennial celebration. They are held on Thursday evenings in tandem with the City’s Family Nights on the Boardwalk.The second and last Open House of this season is scheduled for August 6 from 6 to 8 pm at the clubhouse at 14th Street and the Boardwalk.For more information, call 609-398-0534. Ocean City Fishing Club member Bob Dever demonstrates some long casts from the end of the 14th Street Pier during an open house on Thursday, July 23. Members of the Ocean City Fishing Club are able to store rods and reels in a clubhouse at the base of the 14th Street Pier.last_img read more

2 Sisters takes on pizza recruits

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first_imgPizza Factory, part of 2 Sisters Food Group, is to create 100 new roles, following new business wins.The firm, based in Nottingham, has seen an increased in production at its Gateside Road and Finch Close sites.It’s working with Nottingham Job Centreplus and the Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education (GIFHE) to deliver up to 100 fully trained operatives to the business by 1st October 2012.Natalie Websterm, HR manager for Pizza Factory, said: “This is good news for Pizza Factory and 2 Sisters and shows how our focus on working with our customers to grow the business is starting to pay off.”last_img read more

Perthshire pie-maker ceases trading

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first_imgThe Wee Pie Company has unexpectedly ceased trading, just months after securing a £150,000 contract to supply Aldi.It is not immediately clear why the business has closed.A winding-up petition has been submitted to Perth Sheriff Court and is being handled by Peterkins Robertson Paul of Glasgow. It is understood that the petition will be printed in newspapers next week to notify the company’s creditors ahead of further liquidation proceedings.Founded by Rose and Alastair Martin in 2011, The Wee Pie Company produced a range of artisan meat pies using local ingredients.Last December’s deal with Aldi saw the company supply 64 stores across Scotland with a range of wild game and savoury products, including steak and black pudding, venison and red wine, and buffalo & ale pies.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s announces new Dean of Faculty

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first_imgVickie Lynne Hess, a native of New York and previous academic dean of the American International College in Massachusetts, has been named Saint Mary’s new dean of faculty, the College announced in a press release Aug. 20. According to the release, Hess received her bachelor’s degree in physics and chemistry from Mount Holyoke College and then pursued a doctorate in chemistry at Indiana University. “I am delighted that our search process brought us Dean Hess,” Senior Vice President and Provost Patricia Fleming said in a press release. “At this juncture in higher education, her prior experience as dean, as well as her background in science, will stand us in good stead. Increasingly more women are coming to us wishing to major in one of the sciences, math or nursing. Vickie understands the complexity of those curriculums. I am grateful to the faculty search committee for urging me to include her as a finalist in our search.” Under the general supervision of Fleming, the dean of faculty oversees curriculum and personnel dealings for all of the current undergraduate departments, interdisciplinary programs and special programs, Hess said. “Different programs around campus will be reporting to me,” Hess said. “I am really going to be looking at questions of faculty load. How much teaching are our faculty members expected to do, and what exactly does this teaching look like? Different disciplines have different ways of teaching, and I believe it is important to know and communicate these differences.” Hess said library faculty, the College’s Writing Center, the Center for Academic Initiatives and the section of the Academic Affairs Office that deals with advising will also report to her. With the College implementing a pilot honors program and a learning outcomes-based curriculum called the Sophia Program, Hess said she looks forward to working with the faculty to continue pushing forward College President Carol Mooney’s initiatives. Hess said in recent years, the public has asked higher education institutions for more accountability. In response, Hess plans to work with faculty to create more academic assessments. “The public wants to know what we are doing,” Hess said. “Academic assessments on departments and curriculum are faculty-led efforts, but someone needs to provide the structure to let it happen.” As a product of a single-sex institution, President Mooney said Dean Hess knows what Saint Mary’s is about and will be a great asset to the community. “Today, we are a pretty unique place,” Mooney said. “She has had similar experiences, so she appreciates what we are about here at Saint Mary’s.” Hess said studying science at Mount Holyoke made her realize how important and necessary institutions are that aim to empower women. “I remember being at the American Chemical Society national meeting with my adviser my senior year at Mount Holyoke, and there were times I looked around the room and I was the only woman and I didn’t even have a bachelor’s degree yet,” Hess said. “That is when I realized for the first time I was going into a ‘man’s field.’” Because she studied at a liberal arts institution, Hess said she can easily connect with Saint Mary’s and will continue to promote the importance of teaching Saint Mary’s women not only what they can do, but what they can become. “We are not just functions, we are human beings,” Hess said. “We have to prepare our students not for what is out there today, but for things they are going to have to learn down the road.” Yesterday marked the first day of the academic calendar, and Hess said she is excited for the campus to continue to buzz with students. “I am thrilled to be here,” Hess said. “I am excited about the warmth of the community. From the very first day, the community has reached out to me, and I feel very much at home.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

4-H Future.

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first_img New 4-H Focus Today’s 4-H’ers focus on leadership, community service and technology. While still grounded in its rural roots, 4-H has grown to meet the needs of all of America’s youth – rural, urban and suburban alike. “Character education is a big issue for us in the coming years,” Ryles said. “Ethical issues are a major concern for young people today, as well as their parents.” According to Public School Teachers in the U.S., the greatest issues facing youth during the 1940s were: talking out of turn, chewing gum, running in the halls, making noise, dress code infractions, littering and cutting in line. That list today includes: alcohol abuse, drug abuse, pregnancy, rape suicide, robbery and assault. A national survey of youth ethics conducted by the National 4-H Congress this summer showed that the four major concerns of America’s young people are peer pressure, lack of parental involvement, substance abuse and sexual activity. “In Georgia 4-H, we will also be focusing on urban agricultural issues, and will continue emphasis on environmental education,” Ryles said. A recent survey from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that of the more than 6.5 million 4-H Club members nationwide, most are enrolled in projects that are centered on plants and animals, healthy lifestyle education, science and technology or communication and expressive arts. Georgia has more than 138,000 4-H members enrolled in clubs. More of Georgia’s 4-H’ers live in central cities than live on farms. The largest number of 4-H’ers, 41.3 percent, live in rural, non-farm areas. Thirty-two percent live in small towns and cities of 10,000 to 50,000. Changing Face of 4-H Regardless of when the club actually began, be assured the 4-H Club of the next millennium isn’t your grandparents’ 4-H Club. “It’s not just agriculture any more,” said John Williams, a 4-H’er from Doughtery County, and a member of the 1999 National 4-H Congress leadership committee. “It’s a whole new experience.” As the world changed over the last century, so did 4-H. When man was headed to the moon, 4-H introduced new programs and projects like rocketry, electronics and frozen foods. “4-H has always been evolving,” said Bo Ryles, Georgia’s state 4-H program leader. “That’s how we have remained relevant to the lives of children in this state and across the county.” When 4-H began, almost 100 years ago, children were focused on helping on the family farm, learning homemaking skills and trying to get to school. The 4-H Club was established to help rural youth learn by doing. Who had the very first 4-H Club is hotly debated. Georgia claims the first club was the Boys Corn Club established in Covington, Ga., in 1904. A girls canning club quickly followed in Hancock County. However, Springfield, Ohio, has the earliest claim in 1902. In 1914, when Congress established the Cooperative Extension Service, 4-H Clubs were made a part of the organization and have been administered through the land-grant institutions in each state ever since. “We are recognizing the Centennial of the 4-H Club in 2002,” said Susan Stewart, director of the National 4-H Congress. “The National 4-H Congress will be held in Atlanta over Thanksgiving weekend through the Centennial celebration.” center_img This story is another in a weekly series called “Planting the Seed: Science for the New Millennium.” These stories feature ideas and advances in agricultural and environmental sciences with implications for the future.last_img read more

Rebuild, repair, recover: Affinity Plus helps the Twin Cities heal

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first_img continue reading » On May 25, 2020, a 46-year-old Black man named George Floyd was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis. The next day, protests against police violence began in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul and have since spread to hundreds of cities across the United States and around the globe.In some instances, peaceful protests turned into rioting and looting. According to a Star Tribune article published on June 6, more than 500 shops and restaurants in Minneapolis and Saint Paul have reported protest-related damages. Owners and insurance experts estimate those damages could exceed $500 million.The protests occurred in the backyard of Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union ($2.6B, Saint Paul, MN). For the Twin Cities-based cooperative, the demonstrations underscored two truths. First, it could and should do better on matters of race and equality, inside its walls and out. And, second, it needed to help those affected by the protests. In addition to taking a corporate stand against racial injustice and discrimination, the credit union launched Twin Cities Healing, a fund that coordinates contributions to 10 certified 501(c)3 nonprofits working to address racial injustice, rebuilding efforts, and basic needs. The credit union is distributing $136,000, and members are voting on how to distribute the funds among the approved organizations. To further address these issues, Affinity Plus also created an employee directed fund called Affinity Plus Gives, which made available an additional $200,000 in funding for organizations dedicated to making an impact.In this Q&A, Affinity Plus CEO Dave Larson discusses the current atmosphere in the Twin Cities, his credit union’s response in the weeks that followed George Floyd’s death, lessons learned in leadership, and more. Minneapolis, MNcenter_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Marriage ‘Equality’ – Really?

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first_imgQuote of the day“Every marriage policy draws lines, leaving out some types of relationships. Equality forbids arbitrary line-drawing.”The Wisdom of Upholding Tradition – The Wall Street Journal SHERIF GIRGIS, RYAN T. ANDERSON and ROBERT P. GEORGElast_img