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Multiple late-Pleistocene colonisation events of the Antarctic pearlwort Colobanthus quitensis (Caryophyllaceae) reveal the recent arrival of native Antarctic vascular flora

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first_imgAim: Antarctica’s remote and extreme terrestrial environments are inhabited by only two species of native vascular plants. We assessed genetic connectivity amongst Antarctic and South American populations of one of these species, Colobanthus quitensis, to determine its origin and age in Antarctica.Location: Maritime Antarctic, sub‐Antarctic islands, South America.Taxon: Antarctic pearlwort Colobanthus quitensis (Caryophyllaceae).Methods: Four chloroplast markers and one nuclear marker were sequenced from 270 samples from a latitudinal transect spanning 21–68° S. Phylogeographic, population genetic and molecular dating analyses were used to assess the demographic history of C. quitensis and the age of the species in Antarctica.Results: Maritime Antarctic populations consisted of two different haplotype clusters, occupying the northern and southern Maritime Antarctic. Molecular dating analyses suggested C. quitensis to be a young (<1 Ma) species, with contemporary population structure derived since the late‐Pleistocene.Main conclusions: The Maritime Antarctic populations likely derived from two independent, late‐Pleistocene dispersal events. Both clusters shared haplotypes with sub‐Antarctic South Georgia, suggesting higher connectivity across the Southern Ocean than previously thought. The overall findings of multiple colonization events by a vascular plant species to Antarctica, and the recent timing of these events, are of significance with respect to future colonizations of the Antarctic Peninsula by vascular plants, particularly with predicted increases in ice‐free land in this area. This study fills a significant gap in our knowledge of the age of the contemporary Antarctic terrestrial biota. Adding to previous inferences on the other Antarctic vascular plant species (the grass Deschampsia antarctica), we suggest that both angiosperm species are likely to have arrived on a recent (late‐Pleistocene) time‐scale. While most major groups of Antarctic terrestrial biota include examples of much longer‐term Antarctic persistence, the vascular flora stands out as the first identified terrestrial group that appears to be of recent origin.last_img read more

Posh Purplebricks? Seven-month old central London hybrid estate agency expands

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first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Posh Purplebricks? Seven-month old central London hybrid estate agency expands previous nextAgencies & PeoplePosh Purplebricks? Seven-month old central London hybrid estate agency expandsLondon-based Agent & Homes says it now has an 18-strong headcount and has bullish development plans for 2019.Nigel Lewis4th January 201902,912 Views Two former employees of John D Wood say their new ‘modern approach’ hybrid sales and letting agency in central London launched in May last year is expanding fast.This includes increasing its team from the two founders to a head count of 18 and moving into larger premises.Called Agent & Homes, it offers negotiators the opportunity to become self-employed ‘Purplebricks-style’, but enables them to keep 90% of the commission they earn from property sales and rentals.The agency’s founders are Rollo Miles (above, left) and Bob Crowley (above, right), who worked together at Countrywide brand John D Wood two years ago at its Notting Hill branch.After leaving the branch, Miles set up Agent & Homes while Crowley worked for bridging loan disruptor Nested until a few months ago.Agent & Home’s team now works out of a ‘hot desking’ office/hub in Notting Hill Gate while the company provides them with back-office support and also takes 10% of their commission income in return.Estate agencyThe consultants working via the hub include another former John D Wood colleague Tim Lawler, Willem Colin (formerly at Douglas & Gordon) and Aaron Bryce (Nested).“Growth has been quicker than we anticipated and we now have properties for sale and let across Central and West London and have even started marketing properties as far away as Essex after recently agreeing the sale of a lovely apartment in Brentwood,” says Miles.The company currently has 31 properties for sale and 35 rental properties listed on Rightmove.Rollo Miles agent & homes Bob Crowley January 4, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

McDonald’s backs toasties

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first_imgFast FOOD chain McDonald’s said it has no intention of ditching its recently-introduced Toasted Deli Sandwiches, despite disappointing sales and a planned replacement of some of the range this summer.“There are no plans to cut back or drop the range,” said McDonald’s, after its UK chief operating officer declared himself unimpressed by sales since the toasted sandwiches were introduced last September. “Their popularity continues to grow.”The company declined to give sales figures but claimed that any disappointment at the figures was based on high expectations for the range, which was designed to sit alongside the salads and other ‘healthier’ products it has introduced.McDonald’s said that it was working on new versions of the sandwiches to replace some products in the range this summer. The launch of the range in the UK followed its introduction in the US and Canada; the range is not on sale elsewhere.last_img read more

Reporting In Some reformulation would benefit consumers

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first_imgPaul Catterall,Bakery technology manager, Campden BRIJust when we thought we had everything (almost) under control with our salt levels in bread, we get another missive from the Food Standards Agency with its first raft of recommendations for reduced saturated fat in bakery products. Following consultation with the industry they have announced specific targets to reduce the saturated fat content in plain, sweet and savoury biscuits, and plain cakes by at least 10%; and 5% in non-plain biscuits (those not containing chocolate) by 2012.It’s a difficult question: who is responsible for what we eat? Consumers must take some responsibility for their diet and cannot always blame the baking industry for making products that are tempting and delicious. Bread may be a staple in the diet, but cakes and biscuits are seen as treats. Consumers know they contain fat and sugar and they may not be healthy, but they make you feel good and that is a distinct benefit. But at the same time, the industry must realise we do have a responsibility for the components of our products.One of the problems is that there was previously no incentive to reduce fat levels; they would have to be reduced by at least 25% to make a claim and, if we could not make a claim, why should we bother? When I started in the industry we had a free rein on the ingredients we used for product development and, as a result, we used high levels of fats and sugars. Even now, many recipes that have high levels of these ingredients could easily be reduced by quite simple reformulation and I have often suggested that a small reduction would benefit consumers’ diet. So now we have the impetus to reduce fat levels, but ensure you understand its functionality in your product before you do anything drastic.last_img read more

Tim Hortons plans Northern Ireland drive-through site

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first_imgCanadian coffee chain Tim Hortons is to open its first drive-through site in Northern Ireland.Located in Belfast’s Connswater Shopping Centre and Retail Park, the site is the brand’s second in Northern Ireland and follows the opening of a store on Fountain Street, Belfast, in May.“When we opened our first Belfast restaurant, we were completely blown away by the excitement and we’ve been doing roaring trade ever since,” said Kevin Hydes, chief finance and commercial officer of the Tim Hortons UK franchise.The business made its UK debut in May 2017, opening in Glasgow, and has since opened further sites in Cardiff and Manchester. It offers a menu including its signature coffee and Timbits, as well as its bite-sized doughnuts.Hydes added that the business was in the process of identifying a number of sites across Northern Ireland in the coming few years.“We have some work to do before we open in Connswater Retail Park and look forward to working with Belfast City Council’s planning department to expedite the process so we can start trading in East Belfast as quickly as possible.”The Tim Hortons brand was founded by its namesake, a top ice hockey player, in Canada in 1964 and now has 4,700 sites in Canada, the US, and around the world.last_img read more

Suwannee Roots Revival Adds Oteil & Friends, Leftover Salmon, & More

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first_imgOteil & Friends, Leftover Salmon, Bruce Cockburn, and Horseshoes & Hand Grenades have been added to the lineup for the Suwannee Roots Revival. Now in its third year, the event will return to its home its home at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak, FL from October 11th to October 14th.The upcoming festival’s edition of Oteil & Friends will find Dead & Company bassist Oteil Burbridge join by John Kadlecik, Weedie Braimah, Alfreda Gerald, Jay Lane, Scott Metzger, and Jason Crosby. Other additions to the lineup include Shinyribs, Dustbowl Revival, Jon Stickley Trio, The Grass Is Dead, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, and artist-at-large David Gans. They all join a bill that already features Keller Williams’ PettyGrass Featuring The HillBenders, Donna the Buffalo, The Seldom Scene, Samantha Fish, Peter Rowan Free Mexican Airforce, Jim Lauderdale, Verlon Thompson, Rev. Jeff Mosier, and Joe Craven & The Sometimers.Suwannee Roots Revival will feature five stages, and many of the bands on the lineup will play multiple sets. In addition to music, the festival will feature camping, yoga, music workshops, a kids tent, disc golf, canoeing/kayaking, and campground pickin’ sessions.Tickets for the festival are now on sale. You can check out the full lineup below.last_img read more

Seniors reflect during retreat

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first_imgWith seven semesters behind them and one to go, more than 150 seniors will spend time reflecting on their Notre Dame experiences at the Senior Retreat this weekend, according to head organizer and senior Erin Connors. “It’s going to be a great weekend,” she said. “We’re focusing on how to cherish the last five months of our senior year beyond the last things to check off the ‘bucket list.’” Connors has been planning the retreat with senior Andrew Bell and 18 other students since Oct. 30. The retreat begins at 3:30 p.m. today and concludes Saturday evening with a closing dinner. “This is an opportunity to reflect on the last three and a half years,” Bell said. “Some reflections will be shared by the planning team to start conversation in small groups.” Bell said in planning, the team considered what seniors needed as their time at Notre Dame drew to a close. “It’s been interesting planning parts of a retreat knowing they’re for our friends and classmates, and, at the same time, for us. At the heart of what we’re hoping for is to provide an opportunity to pause when we’re at a time as seniors that everyone is telling you to go, go — to hurry,” Bell said. “It’s a moment to pause and reflect on changes.” While this year’s retreat follows a general pattern set by the past six retreats, the content is new because the planning team is different, said Fr. Joe Carey, the interim director of Campus Ministry. Carey led the Senior Retreat for the last six sessions, though Senior Retreats have occurred on campus since the 1970s. “It makes me proud to be at Notre Dame,” he said. “It’s different every year because of the team. It’s [a new retreat] in that it’s [the planning committee’s] experiences – they really capture all of the things Notre Dame students face.” In the past, the retreat has been career-focused, with alumni speaking on life after college, Carey said. The aim for the last few years has been for a more spiritual exploration. “This year we have added a talk that two people are giving on gratitude. We want attendees to see who to be thankful for,” he said. “The retreat is starting a process of reflection through this weekend, the next four months and beyond.” Carey assembled the planning committee over the summer, purposefully picking leaders he felt could bring together a successful retreat. “It’s seniors leading seniors,” he said. “We were gathering a team of student leaders, and we came up with a team from various facets of Notre Dame that will enable attendees to grow.” In addition to this weekend’s retreat, three more Notre Dame Encounters and two Freshman Retreats will happen before the school year’s end, Carey said. “They have a different feeling than this retreat — and anyone can participate in the Notre Dame Encounters,” he said. “They are also smaller, with the limit set at 50 people.” More information on the retreats is available at campusministry.nd.edu.last_img read more

Laws banning physical discipline of children are based on faulty science.

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first_imgIs it harmful to smack your child?MetcatorNet 14 February 2017Family First Comment: This is a superb read. It proves beyond doubt that anti-smacking laws are based on B.S. – Bad Science.In recent years, some medical organizations and many media outlets have claimed that disciplinary spanking causes emotional harm in children that predisposes them to aggressive behaviour when they are older. In an email interview with MercatorNet Professor Robert Larzelere of Oklahoma State University explains what is wrong with the studies on which this view is based. A more detailed critique of the studies by Dr Larzelere and Den A. Trumbull, MD, can be found at the website of the American College of Pediatricians.The use of spanking – or, more broadly, smacking — by parents to discipline their children has been banned in dozens of countries on the basis of studies that show it leads to aggression and mental health problems. The American Academy of Pediatrics “strongly opposes” spanking on these grounds. Isn’t this settled science?Anti-spanking advocates would like to convince everyone influential that the worldwide trends for countries to ban spanking is based on settled science. But when they have to defend the adequacy of their science on a level playing field they have been unable to do it. We saw this in the 1996 scientific consensus conference on corporal punishment1 and when both sides of the scientific evidence were presented to three levels of the Canadian court system in a case finally decided in 2004.2The position of the American Academy of Pediatrics, which co-sponsored the scientific consensus conference, was a compromise compared to the draft they had been planning to publish, because the conference exposed how weak the scientific evidence was against spanking.3 All invited participants were able to propose additional statements to the conference summary after thinking more about the scientific evidence and the complexity of various issues about the use of corporal punishment.It was mostly participants who took a more balanced perspective based on the scientific evidence who took this opportunity, including Drs. Diana Baumrind, Den Trumbull, and Robert E. Larzelere.4 The only others were well-respected pediatricians, Robert W. Chamberlin and Rebecca Socolar, who are not known to be anti-spanking advocates but sincerely want to learn what the best advice should be for parental discipline. Those in the conference known to be anti-spanking advocates did not take the opportunity to add statements, or only voted for a few proposals that sided with them. I heard one of them say during the conference something like, “We might as well go home now, since we are not going to get an anti-spanking consensus statement.”The balanced position differentiates between appropriate vs. inappropriate ways to use disciplinary spanking as well as other disciplinary methods and tries to use science to learn what is the best balance for parents to use when disciplining their children. In contrast, the most vocal anti-spanking researchers are primarily interested in imposing their agenda on the world, and producing and highlighting data that seems to support that viewpoint.The AAP refers to spanking in the context of “harsh physical punishment, such as pushing, grabbing, shoving, slapping or hitting”. How do you define spanking? In what circumstances would it be appropriate for a parent to use it?This illustrates part of the problem in the scientific evidence. The research against disciplinary spanking often lumps appropriate spanking together with overly severe physical punishment and punishment that is inappropriate in other ways. This is what the most-referenced study, the 2002 meta-analysis of the scientific literature by Elizabeth T Gershoff,5 as well as a 2016 update by her and A. Grogan-Kaylor,6 does. It makes for good advocacy, but lousy science.The 1996 scientific conference defined spanking as a type of corporal punishment that is “physical non-injurious; intended to modify behaviour; and administered with an opened hand to the extremities or buttocks.” This is a reasonable approximation of what we consider appropriate spanking, if it is used in appropriate circumstances, such as when 2- to 6-year-olds respond defiantly to milder attempts to get them to cooperate.Gershoff and colleagues’ latest review of the scientific literature claims to study spanking as defined by the scientific conference, but in fact, none of the studies that they use to support their conclusion is limited explicitly to spanking as so defined. For example, very few, if any of the studies go to the trouble of ruling out parents who physically abuse their children from the spanking group. The few studies that exclude abusive parents do not exclude spanking with a paddle or switch – methods that are also outside the definition.(The type of spanking that has been shown to produce better child outcomes than most other disciplinary options is summarized in response to a later question.)What exactly is wrong with the methods of Dr Gershoff and others?We are especially critical of the fact that anti-spanking advocates rely so much on simple, unadjusted correlations, which not only do not prove causation, but make all corrective actions appear to be harmful. That is because correlations do not take account of pre-existing differences in the children being compared. Children who are more seriously oppositional or defiant may remain more so than others regardless of how parents discipline them, but that may be because their prognosis was worse to start with, not because of the corrective disciplinary action itself.The analogy of chemotherapy may help because it is also a corrective action: correlations would indicate superficially and incorrectly that chemotherapy makes cancer worse, because patients who are receiving chemotherapy now or did so last year are more likely to have cancer now than the rest of us who didn’t need chemotherapy last year or this year.Controlled longitudinal studies (summarised by Chris Ferguson in 2013)7 have concluded that children show superficial, trivial adverse effects of spanking that disappear for children under the age of 7. With Ronald Cox and Emilio Ferrer and others9,10 I have replicated this strongest type of evidence against customary use of spanking and found very similar evidence against everything else that parents use to try to reduce oppositional defiance in young children, including privilege removal, grounding, sending children to their room, docking their allowance, and getting professional help (child psychotherapy or Ritalin).In additional analyses, we showed that this trivial, superficially adverse effect is due to what remains of the poor prognosis for children who are frequently oppositional and defiant, not due to customary ways that parents spank their children. What else does your research show?With Brett Kuhn8 I compared the child outcomes of four types of physical punishment with all disciplinary alternatives that have been analyzed in the same studies with the same methods on the same families. We concluded that the outcomes of physical punishment were worse than alternatives only when the physical punishment was (#1) overly severe or (#2) was the dominant method of discipline.With other colleagues I have shown that alternative disciplinary tactics lead to the same results as does (#3) customary spanking or customary “physical punishment.”9,10 Getting professional help in the form of psychotherapy or Ritalin also appears to be just as harmful as customary spanking. In other words, when using the same statistical methods that provide the strongest causal evidence against customary spanking, Ritalin appears to be just as harmful as spanking. This shows additional evidence that the superficially harmful outcomes of spanking are due to the remaining poor prognosis of children whose behavior causes parents to use every kind of discipline more, rather than being due to any harmful effect of spanking.Our review of relevant comparisons also found that the fourth type of spanking, conditional or back-up spanking, led to greater reductions in defiance or aggression than 10 of 13 alternatives it had been compared with. Conditional spanking is non-abusive (e.g., two swats to the rear end when parents are not out-of-control due to anger), used when 2- to 6-year-olds respond defiantly to milder disciplinary responses, such as timeout. A forced brief room isolation is the only alternative shown to produce equivalent outcomes in more than one study. Its equivalent effectiveness was noted in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Guidance for Effective Discipline, 11 as a reason spanking could be replaced (Bullet Point #8, p. 728), but without specifying what that effective alternatives is, apparently because room isolations are also opposed by advocates on ideological grounds. Despite the fact that this evidence about conditional spanking was based on nine studies, including the four studies with the most valid causal evidence,12 anti-spanking advocates keep on claiming that there is no evidence of beneficial outcomes of appropriate disciplinary spanking.Since then, Dr. Majorie Gunnoe 13 has also shown that, if anything, children who were spanked are doing better as adolescents than never-spanked children, as long as the spanking ceased after 11 years of age. These are the kinds of evidence that anti-spanking advocates choose to ignore rather than to respond to.Interestingly, one of the leading anti-spanking advocates also published a recent study 14 showing that spanking did not have any adverse effects if parents were no longer spanking at age 9, and such phased-out spanking was associated with better outcomes in conservative Protestant families, apparently because it was more likely to be perceived as appropriate parental discipline rather than evidence of parental rejection.There is, however, an alarming amount of child physical abuse in some quarters of society. Isn’t it worth banning physical discipline altogether for the sake of children vulnerable to real abuse? Aren’t alternatives like time out and withdrawal of privileges enough for good parents?This is the main rationale for spanking bans, using the same logic that was used for the Prohibition Amendment in the United States a century ago. Unfortunately most evidence indicates that enforced spanking bans lead to increases in physical child abuse as well as other forms of violence as children grow up without effective discipline.Recent studies continue to show escalating rates of criminal assaults by minors in Sweden. The first country to ban spanking in 1979, Sweden has enforced this law more vigorously than most other spanking-ban countries. Physical child abuse, criminal assaults against minors by minors, and rapes of children under the age of 15 are occurring more than 20 times as often in 2010 than was the case in 1981, according to Swedish criminal records. 15A five-nation comparison in Europe 16 found that some kinds of verbal and physical violence are higher in countries that have banned spanking compared to those who had not banned spanking. For example, 79% of intimate partners say that they insult their partners in Sweden, compared to 36% in countries without spanking bans. A surprising 34% of partners get tackled or hit in Sweden compared to 18% in countries without spanking bans.The only evidence that physical abuse decreases after spanking bans comes primarily from countries where most parents were unaware that mild spanking had been banned! Because less than 1/3 of parents in Germany and Austria were aware that mild spanking had been technically banned, the five-nation study compared parents who thought mild spanking was legal (and only severe physical punishment was illegal) vs. parents who recognized that all spanking was banned. Those who thought they could still legally use mild spanking were less likely to resort to severe physical punishment.There was a similar finding for how they were disciplined as children. Those receiving mild spanking but not severe physical punishment were less likely to use severe physical punishment with their children. This supports a speculation we made in 199917 that mild spanking can serve to bring a frustrating discipline episode to a conclusion before parents get so frustrated that they erupt by hitting the child harder than they otherwise would.Also, haven’t the people who say that spanking, even if mild, teaches children that “hitting others is OK” got a point?With that logic, we should quit fighting fire with fire, and we should unilaterally disarm rather than think that a strong military defense will help stop wars against us. Parents’ goals should always be to resolve disciplinary disagreements in the best way possible, such as finding a mutually acceptable compromise when applicable or explaining why, if that will help. But children need to learn that they cannot get their way by having increasingly worse tantrums or with increasing aggression, verbal or physical.One of my mentors, Dr. Gerald Patterson started by trying to reinforce (reward) children for good behavior, assuming that their behavior would improve with that method alone. He still supports reinforcing good behavior, but said in his major book, Coercive Family Process, in 1982:18 “If I were allowed to select only one concept to use in training parents of antisocial children, I would teach them how to punish more effectively. It is the key to understanding familial aggression” ( p. 111). By that, he meant timeout, because he personally opposed spanking.All the other gurus of behavioral parent training — the primary psychosocial treatment supported for ADHD In the guidelines of clinical child psychologists, pediatricians, and child psychiatrists — also used timeout, but they recommended a two-swat spanking to enforce cooperation with staying on the timeout chair — until spanking fell into disfavour in the 1990’s.So parents should prefer the mildest disciplinary response that can get acceptable cooperation from children. But children need to learn that persistent defiance in response to milder responses will not let them get their way. In such cases non-abusive spanking can be a very effective enforcement of milder disciplinary responses, which is why most behavioral parent training protocols recommended that from the late 1960’s, when they were developed, to the mid-1990’s. By then the gurus could no longer get research funding if they continued using the spank backup (but they never found anything more effective).And what about children’s dignity and rights?As children grow up, they develop rights and responsibilities together. We require many things of children that are not required of adults (vaccinations, school attendance). A balance of love and limits, which is called authoritative parenting, has been shown to be optimal for children to achieve their potential. The polarized extremes of authoritarian parenting (limits without love) and overly permissive parenting (love without limits) fall way behind in developing their potential competencies across a range of outcomes. 19The argument that children should not be subject to negative disciplinary consequences that would be unacceptable for adults is an argument against most negative disciplinary consequence, including timeout, grounding, etc. To maximize their potential, children need both love and limits when they are young, so they don’t need to learn lessons about cooperating with people around them when they are older and the negative consequences are worse and longer lasting.Discipline is obviously an essential but challenging part of raising children. Can people rely on their instincts, or the way they were brought up, to find the right approach for their kids? Do we need more education for parents – new parents anyway?I would like parents to be able to learn from the best available information, not just from the way they were raised. Unfortunately, the disciplinary messages that are emphasized in the media are based on ideological viewpoints and advocacy efforts rather than objective science. We are trying to provide the kind of fact-checking that seems to be needed more today than in previous generations.Robert E. Larzelere is a Professor of Human Development and Family Science at Oklahoma State University, specialising in research methodology and the study of parental discipline. He was one of 7 experts invited to present evidence at the only scientific consensus conference on outcomes of corporal punishment, co-sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics. He was one of three expert scientific witnesses called by Canada’s Dept. of Justice to defend the use of reasonable force by parents to correct children’s behaviour. He has published research comparing child outcomes of physical discipline with alternative disciplinary responses based on his own data and on large national data sets from the United States and Canada. He has also published literature reviews of the most relevant studies in leading professional journals in paediatrics and in clinical child psychology.Den A. Trumbull, M.D. is a founding member of the American College of Pediatricians and was one of 20 experts invited to the 1996 scientific consensus conference on outcomes of corporal punishment by the co-chairs of that conference.https://www.mercatornet.com/family_edge/view/is-it-harmful-to-smack-your-child/19348Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Glenn Allen Burris

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first_imgGlenn Allen Burris, 46, of Aurora, IN, passed away Friday, May 27, 2016 in Lawrenceburg, IN.He was born Sunday, September 21, 1969 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, Son of George “Glenn” Burris and Martha Burris.Glenn worked as the Horseshoe Lake Campground manger. He was a self-employed Home Renovator and Real Estate Broker and mechanic. He loved his home renovation business, Burris and Associates. The business allowed him to work with his son Justin, teaching him the skills related to the business.Glenn was a graduate of South Dearborn High School. He was a wrestler while in school and continued in the sport by being an assistant coach. Glenn was a workaholic. He enjoyed his work of renovating old houses and making them look new. His building and craftsmanship showed the pride that he took in his work. He also loved camping, old country music, kayaking, stained glass work, gardening, old Westerns and beekeeping. He valued spending time with friends, dogs, Roxy and Axle and family the most. He will be missed by all..Surviving are his wife, Mary Jean Pfister Burris; children, Justin L. Burris and Reagan L. Burris of Aurora, IN; Father, Glenn Burris of Rising Sun, IN; Mother, Martha Burris of Aurora, IN; Siblings, Brian (Becky) Burris of Burlington, KY, Ruth Penny of Aurora, IN, Jennifer (Terry) Jackson of Rising Sun, IN, Mary (J.R.) Hardison of Moores Hill, IN.Friends will be received 5:00 – 8:00 PM, Thursday, June 2, 2016 at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the Funeral Home, Friday, June 3, 2016 at 12:00 PM.Interment will follow in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, IN.Contributions may be made to Love the Hungry . If unable to attend, please call the office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Linda Gail Wittkorn

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first_imgLinda Gail Wittkorn 75 of Moores Hill passed away at her residence on Wednesday August 9, 2017.  Linda was born Wednesday August 27, 1941 in Marion, North Carolina the daughter of William R. and Kitty V. (Hutchins) Mues Sr.   She married Heinz A. Wittkorn May 5, 1959, who survives.  Linda was a former employee of Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati working in the medical records department.  Linda enjoyed animals, especially her cats.Linda is survived by husband, Heinz of Moores Hill, son Josef (Valerie) Wittkorn of Delaware, Ohio, brother William R. Mues Jr. of Cincinnati, and 4 grandchildren, Amber, Ethan and Aaron Wittkorn and Erika Basil.Private services will be held at the convenience of the family.  Memorials may be made in her memory to the Salvation Army through the funeral home.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home, Moores Hill entrusted with arrangements; Box 156, 47032;  (812)744-3280.  Go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more