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Hundreds rally for post-election unity at Broad Street demonstration

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first_imgOn November 13, a ‘Love Rally’ was organised by Oxford students on Broad Street, Central Oxford. Hundreds of people gathered outside the Clarendon Building to express peaceful solidarity, following but not exclusively in response to the results of last week’s US election.The organisers of the rally urged fellow students “Come stand in solidarity with the people who will be made most vulnerable by a Trump presidency. Come stand in solidarity with the people who fear being stripped of their rights.”Following the U.S. election, those who were experiencing “fear, confusion, sadness, anger, despair, loneliness, disappointment” were encouraged to stand together, whether American or not, in peaceful unity.Elizabeth Shaughnessy, one of the organisers of the rally, told Cherwell, “We organized the Love Rally as a way for students and the local community to stand in solidarity with anyone feeling marginalized and alone following the US election as well as Brexit and other nationalist and politically isolating events in Europe. Our goal was to create an inclusive, supportive environment for people here, in America, and abroad.”last_img read more

Young, female, Native American, scientist

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first_imgA pre-veterinary student used drones to study beaver dams in Montana. A senior majoring in chemical engineering researched how to make nontoxic batteries. A sophomore in chemistry got a taste of nanomedicine. Three other students examined bacteria from the gut microbiome as part of research to improve diagnostic tests of infectious diseases.Their projects were different, but the six students who took part in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) had more than one thing in common. All of them were young, female, Native American scientists.Christoffer Abrahamsson (left) of George Whitesides’ lab observes as Racquel White drops solution into a test tube. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe summer program brings students from universities and colleges across the country to perform cutting-edge research in fields such as biomaterials and nanoscale science and engineering, under the auspices of the National Science Foundation. The 10-week program has grown over the years, said Kathryn Hollar, director of community engagement and diversity outreach at SEAS, and the application process is very competitive. This year, 700 students applied for 70 slots, six of which were taken by Chelsea Draper, Trisheena Kills Pretty Enemy, Kylie Ray Lee, Naomi Redfield, Dominique Pablito, and Racquel White, who together made up the largest group of Native American students yet be enrolled.Increasing the number of Native American participants in the program is an effort that the School takes seriously, said Hollar. “Science and engineering are better off when we have people of different cultures and perspectives, because it leads to a richer set of ideas and questions,” she said. “This is also a social justice issue. We have very few Native American scientists and engineers, and it’s our responsibility to provide opportunities for all groups of people that have been historically excluded.”,Building partnerships with tribal colleges and universities in places with large Native American populations has helped increase their representation in the research program. Its significance is not lost on Jason Packineau, community coordinator at the Harvard University Native American Program.“There are many talented Native students in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) throughout the country,” said Packineau. “Hopefully, having these students here will increase the visibility that Harvard is an option for them.”Having more than one Native-American in the program helps keep the students from feeling isolated, alienated, and like token figures, said Packineau. “They’re not singled out as the only Native participant in the program. [They] arrive with a set of peers who have the potential to provide support and share the same background, and, finally, leave Harvard connected to individuals whom they’ll continue to interact with in future academic and professional settings.”On a recent afternoon, the three students who worked on the bacterial tests study sat in a classroom with their mentors, postdoctoral fellows Chris Abrahamsson and Michael Fink, members of the George Whitesides research group.The students were able to work in Whitesides’ lab as they studied how to separate bacteria, mostly E. coli and Staphylococcus, using different combinations of aqueous solutions. Kills Pretty Enemy, a microbiology senior at Montana State University, said the work was exhilarating and helped her think more independently.Michael Fink (right) holds up a test tube following a spin in the centrifuge. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“This was exploratory research,” said Kills Pretty Enemy, a member of the Apsaalooke Crow and the Hunkpapa Lakota tribes. “There wasn’t a protocol. We had to make it as we went. It taught me how to think on my own. It was fantastic.”Being surrounded by other science students was one of the program’s highlights for Lee, a chemistry major at the University of Utah and a member of the Cowlitz tribe. “I was able to talk to other science majors without having to explain what is material science or what is nanomaterial fabrication,” she said. “Instead, we all talked about our own research. It was really awesome.”Pablito, a senior studying chemistry and biology at the University of Utah and a member of the Zuni tribe, missed several cultural events and powwows held at home over the summer. But it was worthwhile. “It was cool to see how other people do research,” she said. “It was also great to experience other cultures and see new cities.”White, a chemical engineering student at Navajo Technical University, said she will miss Whitesides’ lab, but now plans to apply to grad school. “I have always wanted to come to MIT or Harvard,” she said.Draper and Redfield, too, now plan to go to grad school. “It was a door-opener,” said Draper, a chemical engineering student at the University of New Mexico and member of the Navajo nation. Pre-vet Redfield, a Montana State University junior from the Crow reservation, called it “a dream come true.”“Now I want to learn more to help my community,” she said. “I’d like to do research on buffalos, elks, mountain lions, and all the wildlife we have in the reservation to help protect it as much as possible.”last_img read more

1984’s Andrew Gower on Coping with Rats & Big Brother

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first_img 1984 is the London play that just won’t quit and is now at the Playhouse Theatre for a third West End run, this time with an entirely new cast. Adapted from George Orwell’s chilling and prophetic 1949 novel, Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan’s stage version currently stars Liverpool-born actor Andrew Gower as Winston Smith, the Ministry of Truth employee who suffers a bleak trajectory as he learns to succumb to Big Brother. Broadway.com spoke to the lively West End newbie about chilling after an emotionally charged performance and facing down the novel’s notorious Room 101—oh, and those rats.You’re too young to have been around in 1984 itself.Hah! That’s right, I was minus 4 then [Gower is now 27]: not even a twinkle in anyone’s eye.Did you know much about the novel when this offer came your way?I hadn’t read the novel, and when I then went to read it, I made a conscious decision not to actually finish it. I read up to a certain point—and the appendix—but I didn’t actually read the final pages.That’s interesting: why was that?I think I felt that I wanted to remain in a sort of Winston Smith head space so that I would know the story without having read the very end. In every other respect, and for every other big moment, the book has been like our bible, basically.I suppose it frees you up to form your own view of the character.Yes, and in fact at my first audition, [co-directors] Rob [Icke] and Duncan [Macmillan] were very interested to see how I would approach [the material] not having read the book. The fact is, there are so many people who have seen the film or read the book or both and they have such a concrete image of it all in advance, whereas I think it was important for me to go on a journey, discovering both the character and the book as I went along.The material is certainly timely.What’s extraordinary is how genuinely timeless Orwell’s writing is. So many current events or how they are reported in the press seem to fit what is described in the book, so you’re always finding bits of the novel jumping out at you. Something will happen, and I will think, “that’s very thought police, that’s very double-think”: it’s as if Orwell has created a language to speak to us right now.Which must explain why a production first seen in London at the Almeida early in 2014 keeps coming back—and has toured internationally as well.From day one of rehearsals, every single member of the cast was basically referring to how poignant 1984 is for us today. There are so many reasons why [the production] has had a prolonged run, and I can’t imagine why that shouldn’t continue given the demand of people who either know the story already or want to discover it for themselves.How would you describe Winston?I see him as a man who is forever trying to find an answer to his problem when there is never an answer but only further questions. The book doesn’t give you answers and I don’t think the play should either, beyond the fact that Winston starts the play not really knowing who he is and is constantly trying to find an identity and in a way only realizes by the end end how happy he has been.That awareness comes at a terrible price.Yes, Winston ultimately is a tortured soul trapped in a world in which he doesn’t fit in. He’s stripped back to a non-person, back to a blank canvas.There are so many images associated with the novel—not just the fearsome Room 101, but the rats that exist to torture Winston.It’s funny you mention that because when I first told my parents I was doing this, my dad hadn’t read the novel but my mum had and the very first thing she said was “rats!” She’s English but lives in Turkey and is coming over this summer to see me in the play.So not one, then, for the squeamish.I wouldn’t let [the rats] put you off a performance, but I suppose you can always stand up and leave [laughs].You graduated from drama school [the Oxford School of Drama] six years ago but are only now making your West End debut.Yeah, which is funny because when I left drama school, I always envisaged that my career would be on stage; I never saw it going down the route of TV and film, so for this to be only my third theater job and in something so incredible and illustrious is really amazing.I saw you described in one of your TV roles as exhibiting a characteristic nervous energy in that part—is that how you see yourself as an actor?Well, it’s always nice to hear what people pick up on, but for me it has to do with how you access emotions once you’ve found the character. On [BBC supernatural drama] Being Human, for instance, I might be playing a vampire but the job is still about presenting a character with whom the audience can form a connection—who feels real. To me, it’s always about the search for identity.Is this show hard to switch off after each performance?At the moment, I’ve been stopping off at Whole Foods and buying myself a super green juice and watching highlights of the football on TV. Last night’s performance, for instance, was quite raw and bloody so it took me a while. It’s important to get back home and switch off and turn on some trashy television. View Comments Andrew Gower in ‘1984’(Photo: Manuel Harlan)last_img read more

Safe chicken

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first_imgSeparate raw meat from cookedor ready-to-eat foods.Don’t use the same cuttingboard or knife for raw poultry and other foods.Don’t handle raw and cookedfoods without washing your hands thoroughly in between.Wash your hands, too, after handling frozen or thawed chicken oreggs. Wash your hands with warm, running water and soap for atleast 20 seconds, rubbing them together and rinsing thoroughly.Don’t put cooked meat backonto a plate or surface with raw meat juices.Don’t use raw or soft-cookedeggs in food preparations that won’t be heat-treated orcooked.Keep surfaces clean.Thoroughly wash surfaces, plates or utensils that have come intocontact with raw meat.Use a thermometer. Again, cookpoultry pieces to 170 and whole birds to 180. You can’t tell bylooks if the meat is properly done. It’s important to use a meatthermometer. By Helen CarterUniversity of GeorgiaYou may be asking yourself, “With all this talk about bird flu,is it safe for me to handle and eat chicken?”In University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offices across thestate, that’s the question agents are answering most often thesedays.Recent media coverage of avian influenza, or bird flu, hasconsumers questioning the safety of poultry. To date, theguidelines for safely handling and cooking chicken haven’tchanged.The World Health Organization still says that no epidemiologicalinformation suggests that anyone has been infected through eatingwell-cooked, contaminated poultry meat. WHO also says there’s noevidence that products shipped from affected areas have been thesource of infection in humans.Proper cookingNormal cooking to the recommended temperatures (170 degreesFahrenheit for poultry pieces and 180 for whole birds) willinactivate the viruses if they’re present. Other guidelines: To learn more about this or other food topics, contact your localUGA Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.(Helen Carter is the University of Georgia CooperativeExtension County Coordinator in Pike County, Ga.)last_img read more

Spain Respects Colombia’s “Sovereign Decision” On U.S. Troops

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first_imgBy Dialogo August 11, 2009 Spain’s deputy prime minister said that Madrid respects Colombia’s decision, “in the exercise of its sovereignty,” to reach an accord with Washington on allowing U.S. troops to be stationed at bases in the Andean nation. Maria Teresa Fernandez de la Vega expressed that respect during a press conference at the presidential palace in Bogota after meeting with head of state Alvaro Uribe. She denied the Spanish government had changed its position on the matter after an initial statement about it by Foreign Minister Miguel Angel Moratinos, who said last week on a visit to Brazil that the pact could lead to a militarization of the region. Fernandez de la Vega said that Moratinos himself refined that statement in a subsequent telephone conversation with his Colombian counterpart. After receiving additional information from Uribe, she could say the Colombian government has taken a decision in the exercise of its sovereignty to do whatever gets results in the fight against terrorism and drug trafficking, and the Spanish administration respects that decision “because it couldn’t be any other way.” Asked whether Spain might mediate the hostility of countries like Venezuela and Ecuador for the pact between Colombia and the United States, she would only say that Spain will always work in favor of dialogue to seek a reconciliation of positions. Officials in the Spanish delegation said that Fernandez de la Vega told Uribe that the government of Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero is willing to explore ways to help lower tensions by establishing contacts with governments in the region. Uribe appeared briefly with the deputy prime minister at the press conference, but made his exit before the questions started, leaving Vice President Francisco Santos to face reporters. Fernandez de la Vega took advantage of his appearance to confirm Spain’s commitment to “walk side by side with Colombia and Uribe” to achieve an end to violence in this country. A position that she also conveyed to a group of representatives of organizations working in favor of peace with whom she met previously. Fernandez de la Vega and Santos were together in describing bilateral relations as extraordinary and saying that proof is the coming transfer to Afghanistan of a Colombian military unit under the command of the Spanish contingent in the Asian nation.last_img read more

Long-awaited Delhi giant pumpkin now reaching nearly 400 pounds

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first_imgChytalo had a goal of 100 pounds for this year’s giant pumpkin by the third week of the month, but as of Wednesday, he said it’s nearly 400 pounds! DELHI (WBNG) — A local man has been growing giant pumpkins at Delaware Academy for years, and this season’s patch is doing extremely well. Ed Chytalo grows pumpkins in the school’s garden. No normal jack-o-lanterns, however, these pumpkins are hundreds and hundreds of pounds.center_img “I promised her that the kids because of the corona pandemic, I promised them a real giant this year, so when they get out on the elementary playground, it’s going to put so much smiles on their faces, it’s going to be phenomenal,” explained Chytalo. Last year, he brought the pumpkin all the way down to Times Square in New York City to show off, but isn’t sure that will be possible this year due to the pandemic.last_img read more

Picking up the pieces

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Ander Herrera makes ‘promise’ to Manchester United fans after PSG defeat

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first_imgAnder Herrera makes ‘promise’ to Manchester United fans after PSG defeat Wenger believes United lost the first leg in midfield (Picture: Getty)Wenger added: ‘The difference technically, and speed of understanding of the game, between the two teams was huge and became bigger as the game went on.‘Man United played at home and had one shot on goal in a Champions League game – that tells you about the difference between the two teams.’MORE: Jan Vertonghen adamant that Spurs can beat anyone ahead of Borussia Dortmund clash Ander Herrera hasn’t given up hope just yet (Picture: Getty)Ander Herrera insists Manchester United have not given up hope in the Champions League and has promised to make fans ‘proud’ in the second leg against Paris Saint-Germain.Quickfire goals from Presnel Kimpembe and Kylian Mbappe stunned United after the break at Old Trafford and United were unable to respond in what was Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s opening defeat as interim manager.The Red Devils now face an uphill battle in qualifying for the quarter-finals and must pull off a near-miraculous comeback in Paris without Paul Pogba after the Frenchman’s sending off.Rio Ferdinand believes United will have learned a lot from the defeat and Herrera has reassured supporters that the tie is far from being over.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘We knew it was going to be impossible to be unbeaten forever,’ the Spanish midfielder posted on Instagram.‘But we wanted to give to our fans a special Champions League night and we couldn’t.‘We promise we will keep working hard to make you all proud.’Former Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger believes PSG were able to gain the upper hand by overpowering United in midfield.‘In the Champions League it is an important thing that you cannot be dominated in midfield and the whole evening Man United were dominated in midfield,’ Wenger told beIN SPORTS after the final whistle.‘Paris Saint-Germain played with five midfielders and they never lost the ball. Manchester United could never win the ball back and when they had the ball they lost it very quickly because Paris Saint-Germain dominated the midfield to win the ball back.‘And they lost the battle there, in midfield. When you play at home and you cannot keep the ball, you’re always in trouble and that’s what happened.‘Man United looked very poor in midfield compared to the class of PSG. And basically it was a little advantage for Paris Saint-Germain to play with five midfielders tonight and with less offensive players.’ Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 Feb 2019 12:02 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link656Shares Comment Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Keep politics out of UK infrastructure decisions, says PiP

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first_imgThe Thames Tideway Tunnel is a £4.2bn (€5.9bn) London infrastructure project funded by a group including Dalmore Capital and insurers Allianz and Swiss Life.PiP investors are collaborating with a £370m equity contribution. The NIC, the arms-length government agency announced by chancellor George Osborne in October last year, can play “a vital role” in setting long-term priorities for infrastructure investment in the UK, said the PiP, but it will be rendered “obsolete and ineffectual if its recommendations consistently fail to be acted upon”.Overall, it stressed the importance of predictability of long-term returns to pension schemes and said that, for core infrastructure, this mainly had to do with the political, legal and regulatory regimes the assets operate under, as well as in relation to subsidies and any usage revenues.Having noted that infrastructure projects are lengthy ones vulnerable to short-term political risk, PiP said: “It is critical decisions on the UK’s strategic infrastructure needs be separated from short-term, partisan, political interference and that, once the country’s needs are established, there is confidence implementation decisions will be taken within a clearly defined period – not subject to open-ended prevarication”.More specifically, it said it should be mandatory for the government to put before Parliament recommendations from the NIC.“Allowing the government discretion over whether to respond to NIC studies risks introducing political expediency, undermining the perceived independence of the NIC and ultimately rendering it ineffectual,” it said.The Treasury’s consultation proposed that the government would have discretion to do so.The PiP agreed with most other questions in the consultation but opposed the proposal that the remit of the NIC should be set by a letter from the chancellor on behalf of the government.“Allowing the chancellor of the day to set the remit for the NIC risks the introduction of politically driven short termism into the supposed 10-30 year focus of the commission,” said the PiP.“It risks the remit’s being dependent on the particular views of the individuals who happen to hold the office of chancellor at any particular time.”It also disagreed with the NIC’s “working assumption … to only review those areas of infrastructure that are the responsibility of the UK government” and that it should be free to review projects in devolved regions.The responsible authorities in these regions would not, however, be obliged to accept or act on the NIC’s findings, said the PiP.The PiP launched its first investment fund in 2014 and its second in February 2015 – both are externally managed.It launched its first internally managed fund this month, a £1bn direct infrastructure fund.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to National Infrastructure Commission consultation Decisions on strategic infrastructure need to be free from “short-term partisan, political interference” to unlock investment from UK pension schemes, said the Pensions Infrastructure Platform (PiP) in response to a consultation on the National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) that closed yesterday.The infrastructure venture for pension schemes set out the key conditions that needed to be met to funnel investment capital from UK pension schemes into infrastructure projects in the country:A clear pipeline of future projectsProjects structured to reduce overall risk consistent with producing real returns of 2-5% and to minimise any initial periods of zero yieldInflation-linked return streams for debt and equity financingClarity over long-term regulatory and subsidy regimes It held up the Thames Tideway Tunnel (TTT) as a good example of how multi-year construction projects could be structured to appeal to pension schemes, noting that the project “delivers a yield from day one” and includes contractual risk sharing mechanisms.last_img read more

US election: What does the result mean for monetary policy?

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first_imgThe US Federal Reserve (Fed) is expected to delay its next interest rate hike following Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, according to asset managers.Trump’s scathing remarks about Fed chair Janet Yellen earlier in his campaign have caused some commentators to speculate the membership of the Federal Open Markets Committee – which sets monetary policy – may change in the near future.Dominic Rossi, global CIO for equities at Fidelity International, said the probability of a December rate increase “has fallen sharply” following today’s shock result.“The dollar, which has been trending higher in anticipation [of a Hillary Clinton victory], has consequently reversed,” he added. “Both were threats to the bull market, and these have now been postponed. Monetary policy will remain accommodative.”Ian Kernohan, economist at Royal London, agreed the Fed might delay its rate hike.He added: “Trump’s fiscal stimulus plan would be supportive for US economic growth.“However, with trend growth lower thanks to a productivity shortfall and structural demographic pressures, it is difficult to see the US economy growing much more rapidly without running into overheating inflation and a more hawkish Fed.”However, not all commentators believed December was off the table.Mark Dowding, co-head of investment-grade debt at BlueBay Asset Management, argued that the US economy “retains reasonable momentum and, … if US asset markets stabilise, the Federal Reserve remains likely to raise rates in December”.In the run-up to the election, Trump attacked the Federal Reserve and Yellen in particular for being “political” and bowing to pressure from president Barack Obama.In an interview with CNBC in September, Trump said: “[The interest rate] is staying at zero because [Yellen] is obviously political, and she’s doing what Obama wants her to do …. They’ll keep them down even longer … because they want to keep the market up so Obama goes out and the new person that becomes president, let him or her raise interest rates and watch what happens.”Stefan Kreuzkamp, CIO at Deutsche Asset Management, warned that this rhetoric could mean “closer congressional oversight” of the Fed, which could limit its ability to act in the event of another economic downturn.David Lloyd, head of institutional fixed-income portfolio management at M&G Investments, added: “Much of what Trump has said suggests the balance of risks is towards a more hawkish Fed. “In the short term,” he said, “the market will obsess over whether Trump’s rhetoric softens somewhat – ie [he tries] to forge a constructive working relationship with Yellen. If he sticks with his campaign tone, the rates market could get quite lively.”Outside of the US, Matthew Beesley, head of global equities at Henderson, said Europe could see “modest fiscal expansion with ECB-related stimulus in place to counter the short-term impacts of a slower US economy”.However, investor attention is likely to switch to forthcoming elections in France and Germany and a constitutional referendum in Italy, he said.“What price some further anti-establishment success and with it heightened risks to the already fragile growth outlook for Continental Europe?” he asked.BlueBay’s Dowding added: “We would caution against jumping to hasty conclusions regarding the European Central Bank or upcoming European elections in France, Germany or Italy in the wake of this result.”last_img read more