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Overwintering strategies of terrestrial invertebrates in Antarctica – the significance of flexibility in extremely seasonal environments

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first_imgAntarctic terrestrial communities are characterised by their geographical isolation and the survival of extreme environmental stresses. Of particular significance to life history strategies of organisms in continental and maritime. Antarctic zones is the pronounced seasonality, with short (1-4 month) cold summers and long (8-11 month) winters. Activity and growth are largely limited to the summer period, although maintenance costs, undetectable in the short-term, may become significant over winter. Sub-Antarctic invertebrate communities experience a less rigorous regime, as climatic extremes are ameliorated by their oceanic environment, with positive mean temperatures occurring over 6-12 months. Here, year-round activity and growth of invertebrates are common. This paper considers our limited knowledge of the life histories of sub-Antarctic and Antarctic terrestrial invertebrates, to identify features correlated with seasonal and/or climatic cues. There is little evidence for diapause, although seasonal patterns of variation in cold tolerance and cryoprotectant production in direct response to desiccation and decreasing temperatures have been reported. A rapid response to feeding and growth opportunity is shown by maritime. Antarctic species, irrespective of season, although moulting does not occur over winter. Associated reduction of feeding, along with arrested growth and reproductive activity due to the low thermal energy budget over winter are probably sufficient to explain the peaks of moulting and reproduction often observed at the end of winter. Generally there is a high level of flexibility in the observed species life histories, with varying developmental duration and much overlap of generations being the norm, particularly in maritime and continental Antarctica.A formal diapause may be a disadvantage in maritime and continental Antarctic zones, as it would be erroneously triggered by severe conditions during summer. In contrast, the development of specific overwintering strategies including diapause may be unnecessary or even irrelevant in much of the sub-Antarctic, where seasonality is greatly reduced and the risk of severe of stressful environmental conditions during winter is negligible.last_img read more

Cavity use throughout the annual cycle of a migratory woodpecker revealed by geolocators

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first_imgThe importance of cavities as roost sites in migratory species is often unknown because it is challenging to monitor cavity use during the non-breeding period. We documented cavity use throughout the annual cycle of a woodpecker using light-level geolocators. Northern Flickers Colaptes auratus spent 63–90% of nights roosting in a cavity throughout the year, including during migration. The high frequency of year-round cavity use by Flickers suggests that cavities provide benefits beyond nest-sites. Our work highlights the potential use of geolocators to examine cavity use.last_img read more

Utah Punter Wishnowsky makes another All-American Team

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first_img Tags: All-American/Eric Weddle/Louie Sakoda/Luther Elliss/Matt Gay/Mitch Wishnowsky/Tom Hackett Written by December 12, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah Punter Wishnowsky makes another All-American Team Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailWACO, Texas-Wednesday, Utah punter Mitch Wishnowsky was named to a third major All-American team as he was selected to the second team of the American Football Coaches All-American squad.The senior from Perth, Australia ranks ninth nationally in punt average at 45.1 yards per boot.He has also made the Utes the #15 team in the land in net punt average at 40.65 yards per kick.He has placed 22 punts inside the 20-yard line, including nine punts at or inside the 10-yard line and has 19 punts of 50+ yards.Other Utes to earn AFCA All-American honors include defensive lineman Luther Elliss in 1994, defensive back Eric Weddle in 2006, kicker Louie Sakoda in 2008, punter Tom Hackett in 2014 and 2015 and kicker Matt Gay in 2017.last_img read more

Surprise of a Lifetime for Local Tri-State Students

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first_imgSurprise of a Lifetime for Local Tri-State StudentsFEBRUARY 8TH, 2019 TYRONE MORRIS EVANSVILLE, INDIANAThe Evansville Police Department gives some lucky children the surprise of a lifetime every year as part of ‘Cops Connecting with Kids’. Cedar Hall chose 16 students for a trip to the happiest place on Earth. One of those students is 12-year-old Madison Lambert.She’s the last one of her seven siblings to attend Cedar Hall, but she’s the first one lucky enough to go on this trip with EPD.Madison has had a tough year because her mother, Elizabeth Lambert, is battling breast cancer, but her teachers say she always shows up to school with a smile.As part of the surprise for these 16 students, their families greet them as their names are called.Madison’s mom came right from her radiation treatment Friday and says she wouldn’t have missed this moment for the world because of how hard her daughter has worked to get picked.“It’s a great great thing. It made Madison want to work harder every year so she would get picked, and even if she didn’t get picked we told her, ‘hey we’ll find a way to get there, we’ll find a way to get there’, and those kids who did get it, they deserved it. So it proves that you deserve it, baby. She deserves it,” says Lambert.This Connecting with Cops trip is the first time the groups will be flying to Disney World, which is another first for Madison. But a trip to the happiest place on earth is just what Madison needs.This is also the first time the Henderson Police Department will be joining EPD and the kids on the trip. They are all taking off for Disney World on May 13th.Comments0 comments FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Ocean City Reaches New Discount Level in Flood Insurance Program

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first_imgAs a barrier island community, Ocean City is vulnerable to flooding. Ocean City has achieved Class 4 in the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System (CRS). The designation means all NFIP policy holders with compliant structures in Ocean City will receive a 30 percent discount on their flood insurance, according to a city press release Tuesday. The CRS program rewards towns that take action to make properties less vulnerable to flooding. The new rating means Ocean City’s 16,729 policy holders will collectively save $3,292,113 every year – an average savings of about $192 per participating home. Any policy that renews after May 1, 2020, will see the savings. A team of city employees, community members and outside experts is already hard at work on actions that could lead to a Class 3 rating, which would deliver another 5 percent savings. The CRS program is designed to encourage building regulations, flood protection measures, educational efforts and other activities to reduce the potential risk of flood damage.Ocean City property owners pay a total of $10,973,710 in insurance premiums, protecting more than $4 billion worth of property. Only three New Jersey communities have currently achieved Class 4 or better.last_img read more

LASER Golf Day to be held in July

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first_imgThe London & South East Region of Master Bakers will hold its 7th LASER Golf Day at Surrey National Golf Club, on July 10, 2007. All abilities are welcome and there will be prizes for handicaps and non-handicaps, a team award and raffle.The entry fee per team of four is £188 and the day includes coffee and a bacon roll on arrival, 18 holes of golf and a three-course Awards Dinner in the evening.Contact Ray Reddick, 18 Garland Point, Sussex Wharf, Shoreham by Sea, West Sussex BN43 5PF or 07774 188559 (daytime) 01273 465305 (evening).last_img read more

Indiana lawmakers getting ready for socially-distanced legislative session

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first_img Facebook Twitter By Network Indiana – August 19, 2020 0 304 Indiana lawmakers getting ready for socially-distanced legislative session Twitter (“Indiana State Capitol Building” by Drew Tarvin, CC BY 2.0) Legislators are touring a couple of possible alternatives to the statehouse as they get ready for a socially distanced session.The House chamber isn’t big enough for all 100 members to socially distance — because of the way desks are positioned, legislative staffers say they can only fit 42 members on the floor at the time. Even using the premium offices just off the floor or up the stairs, there’s only room for 94. The House would have to make use of offices or other space further away from the floor, making it more difficult to cast votes.Legislators are looking at the convention center, and the Indiana Government Center, which has an auditorium and several conference rooms, as possible alternative sites. But the Organization Day session, when newly elected members are sworn in and a House speaker elected, by law must take place at the statehouse on November 17. Members could change the law and their own rules then to accommodate a more flexible approach to the remainder of the session.A six-member committee studying how to hold the session during a pandemic is leaving it to Speaker Todd Huston (R-Fishers), Senate President Pro Tem Rod Bray (R-Martinsville), and the House and Senate minority leaders to decide how to handle Organization Day. The panel is focusing its efforts on recommendations on where things go from there.Next year’s session must pass a new state budget and new congressional and legislative maps. Beyond that, legislators warn the difficulties of conducting the session may limit their workload. The study committee is already recommending a 10-bill limit on what each senator can introduce. The House already has that limit.The panel is discussing other possibilities to spread out the workload. Avon Representative Greg Steuerwald (R) notes that while legislators normally start the real work of the session in January, state law allows either chamber to convene any time after Organization Day if there’s a quorum. That opens the door to getting an early start on the session in November or December.Indianapolis Representative Ed DeLaney (D) says legislators could borrow a couple of procedures more common in Washington than at the statehouse: using subcommittees to hear bills with fewer legislators in attendance, or conducting hearings on general topics, rather than on bills. He says hearings where no votes are taken could even be conducted by staff.The legislature’s I-T staff is already testing whether lawmakers could cast votes electronically from their offices or other locations. They say it definitely works within the statehouse, but they’re still checking whether it’ll still work further away, at the convention center or legislators’ homes. They say the biggest challenge appears to be providing tech support for legislators who run into difficulty logging in.House Majority Leader Matt Lehman says the November 17 Organization Day will have to change some rules:That first day has to be held at the statehouse on that date. But while legislators normally start the session in earnest in January, state law leaves room to begin earlier.The Indiana House is facing some challenges in holding its session while socially distancing:Legislative staffers say they can socially distance 50 senators in the Senate chamber if they put some of them in the visitors’ gallery. But because of the way the desks are positioned in the House, they can only fit 92 of the 100 members. Legislators may vote to hold the session outside the statehouse, but the November 17 start of the session has to be held there. Pinterest WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Google+ Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Previous articleNotre Dame suspending in-person classes for two weeks due to COVID-19 outbreakNext articleCass County traffic stop leads to drug bust, one arrested Network Indianalast_img read more

When traditions gave way to war

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first_imgIt was 1941. A gallon of gas cost 12 cents. “Dumbo” and “Citizen Kane” hit the movie screen. The U.S. Army adopted the Jeep.When the Class of 1941 entered Harvard, the University still had a full-fledged polo team (now a club), which was a favored destination for future Army officers enamored of the cavalry. There was also an annual freshman smoker in Memorial Hall. In May 1938, 1,000 students from the class attended a performance by circus giant Jack Earle, adventurer Frank “Bring ‘Em Back Alive” Buck, and bubble dancer Sally Rand. She kept her clothes on, and delivered a lecture called “How To Be Intelligent Though Educated.”Last week (May 25-26), during the 70th class reunion, there were no adventurers or burlesque dancers on the program.  But 20 members of the class did return, often with their children and grandchildren. There was plenty of discussion, and that was bittersweet too. (At Harvard, the 70th is the last class anniversary officially celebrated.)In the diversified class were two ministers, a lumber executive, a professor of surgery, two scoutmasters, and an antiques hobbyist. All had retired long ago. There was a political scientist, who in his younger days traveled the world for the United Nations. Also on hand was a onetime Time magazine correspondent and a State Department security expert. (He spent the first 18 months of his World War II naval service cruising the West Indies in a converted yacht.) There was a Connecticut bookstore owner — who for years had scouted the Yale football team for Harvard. There was also a biologist who was a world expert on the anatomy of turtle legs.John Francis Ambrose ’41 was there too. When he entered Harvard in the fall of 1937, he left behind a neighborhood in Queens that had turned out en masse to celebrate his scholarship. His father was a New York City policeman with an eighth-grade education.In those days, parents wrote letters as part of the application process, and the elder Ambrose apologized for his handwriting. “He couldn’t write profoundly,” said the younger Ambrose, who just turned 92. “But he wrote a wonderful letter.” His father died during freshman year, and to this day Ambrose remembers the late-night knock on the door to his fourth-floor room in Thayer Hall. He blames his father’s early death on years of nighttime, all-weather police duty, walking a beat on the waterfront.On the first day of the reunion, Ambrose stood near an upstairs bar at the Doubletree Hotel in Boston. He wore a lime green summer jacket and bright yellow pants. In his hand was a tall glass of amber liquid, no ice. “I learned this in England,” he said, hoisting the glass in a toast. “I never knew what scotch was. But I’ve loved it ever since.”Ambrose first visited England for far less enjoyable reasons. He was a 39th Infantry lieutenant with the 1st Army’s storied 9th Infantry Division, and was getting his platoon ready for the Normandy landings. Behind him was plenty of fighting. Ambrose was with the 9th — among the first American units to see combat in World War II — when it landed in North Africa in November 1942. Then came months of heavy fighting in Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, and Sicily.Late in 1943, when he sipped his first scotch in England, Ambrose was a platoon leader with an anti-tank unit. Ahead of him were the Normandy landings (he reached Utah Beach on D plus 4), and combat in France, the Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe. Ambrose remembers the Normandy hedgerows, the St. Lo breakout, the Battle of the Bulge, and Hürtgen Forest, and doesn’t want to recall any of them.“It was necessary for the country, an experience you wanted to finish,” he said. “It took a long time.” (The 9th spent 304 days in combat, had four Medal of Honor winners, and captured 130,000 Germans. More than 22,000 of its men were killed, wounded, or went missing.)“It wasn’t until the war developed that it made me see the necessity of it,” said Ambrose, who survived seven major campaigns. “I wasn’t worried about the war until it started.”After the war, he made a career in business, starting with Vicks VapoRub, then moving on to the rubber industry, and then settling in for a long run with a New York trade association specializing in silver — a market he still watches. He and his wife, now deceased, raised three daughters and a son.At Harvard, Ambrose was a government concentrator who enjoyed English courses too. He remembered that poet Robert Frost lived upstairs from him at Adams House for a while and used to meet with students in the community room.He had three older brothers, none of them college graduates. Ambrose entered on scholarships from the Harvard Club of New York City (where Chauncey D. Stillman ’29 was his mentor), and from the Price Greenleaf Fund. He worked as a cataloger at Widener Library for 50 cents an hour.With his scotch barely touched in front of him, Ambrose remembered his freshman year at Harvard. That fall, the whole family boarded an Eastern Steamship Lines ship and sailed to Boston to drop him off. All these years later, Ambrose was back with his present-day family. He took a walk through Harvard Yard on his arrival. “It really didn’t look different to me,” he said. “People still tend to gather around the [John Harvard] statue.”last_img read more

HKS students win public service innovation award

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first_imgA team of Harvard Kennedy School students that founded an international social development organization has won the 2012 Accenture Public Service Innovation Award at the Harvard Innovation Challenge. The award is intended to encourage Harvard students to “apply their creative energy to solve pressing public sector challenges and to foster the next generation of government solutions and leaders.”Michael Belinsky, David Bullon, Michael Eddy, Avnish Gungadurdoss, and Madalina Pruna were honored for their vision in creating Instiglio, an organization designed to help governments apply social impact bonds to developing countries. Social impact bonds are a relatively new concept that facilitates private investment for the provision of public services. This concept is being piloted in England and has received initial support in the U.S., but has not yet caught on in developing countries.“We founded Instiglio with the mission of empowering societies to discover, adopt and scale innovative solutions to social problems,” said Belinsky. “Our team united over an opportunity to improve drastically the delivery of social services in developing countries by adapting the social impact bond model to emerging markets. We are thrilled to combine our Kennedy school training and our development world experience (our team has collectively worked in over 20 countries) to durably improve social service delivery. ”Rey Faustino was awarded honorable mention for his education nonprofit, OneDegree. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Program aims to provide foster kids with life experiences

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first_img November 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Program aims to provide foster kids with life experiences Associate EditorHere’s the harsh reality: Some kids in Miami live in neighborhoods so dangerous that they spend entire summers locked behind doors watching TV instead of frisking playfully outside.Many foster children have never known the fun of summer camp or field trips to attractions like the Miami Seaquarium, the Miami Museum of Science, the Miami MetroZoo, or just going bowling, painting ceramics, or swimming.Norman Gerstein, an 11th Judicial Circuit judge and father of two boys, 4 and 8, decided to change that and give a few kids the experiences his own sons enjoy.Inspired by their own children, Judge Gerstein and his wife, Jackie, general counsel for Children’s Home Society, reached into their pockets to send eight foster children to camp at Temple Judea.That kind gesture in 1999 has blossomed into a nonprofit program called Summer Fun for Kids that reached more than 100 children this past summer. Next year, the hope is to double the fun for 200 kids. The grand scheme is to replicate the program throughout the state, through help from the Children’s Home Society.“What gave me the idea was my own children, unquestionably,” Judge Gerstein said. “Even though I represented kids when I was a lawyer, I realized for the first time when I was a parent how much help kids need, how much time they need.”Jackie Gerstein echoed that thought: “The idea started in having children and realizing how important it is to expose them to different things early on, and realizing kids in foster care wouldn’t have those opportunities. Once we became parents, our whole outlook and perspective became different. When our son started summer camp and we saw how much he enjoyed it, we thought: ‘Every child should have this experience.’”The Gersteins enlisted help from a few lawyer friends who make up the Summer Fun for Kids board of directors: Clay Roberts, Kevin Kaplan, and Patrick Knight. Their combined efforts raise money, make sure dollars go directly to helping kids, and take care of administrative paperwork as a 501c3 charitable not-for-profit organization.“It’s an opportunity for us as lawyers to give something back to our community in a way that helps out foster kids who really need help,” said Kaplan, father of three sons, ages 6, 4, and a baby born September 11.“It’s really a grassroots organization. We operate on a small and efficient budget, with essentially no administrative costs. We make telephone calls and send letters to raise money,” said Kaplan, whose law firm Aragon Martin, et al., donated money. “Who can say ‘no’ to this?”Knight, a lawyer with Kubicki Draper and president of the Coconut Grove Jaycees, is a bachelor with no children, but his group of 254 young professionals jumped at the chance to adopt Summer Fun for Kids as one of their “summer-long feel-good projects.”Knight found lawyer members to help with setting up the charity and IRS paperwork.“My members like to have hands-on activities. We worked with the Children’s Home Society organizing field trips to places like the Seaquarium. My members wanted to tag along. A couple of my members are certified rock climbers and took the kids rock-climbing and to the zoo,” Knight said, adding that Jaycees member Sonny Valladares “called 100 places to set up field trips,” and lawyer Annie Hernandez chaired the project and lawyer Anita Figueroa assisted.When Roberts visited the last day of camp, the smiles on the kids’ faces validated his decision to volunteer time with Summer Fun for Kids.“It was great to see kids just being kids, kids who haven’t had a lot of breaks in life having fun and running around. What could be better than seeing kids having fun?”Roberts, who has five children—ages 1, 3, 5, 8, and 10—added: “If it wasn’t for this Summer Fun for Kids, they would just spend the summer sitting at home bored. This gives them an outlet and a way to socialize with other children, being outside and being active.”One of the many benefits of the program, Judge Gerstein said, is that foster kids are “mainstreamed” with children who don’t come from dysfunctional homes.“They learn as much from other children as the program themselves. They learn about attitudes, about kids who did not grow up in foster care,” Judge Gerstein said.“We threw a picnic for the South Miami kids,” of what he called a “tremendous” effort by the City of South Miami to take 60 children in its summer camps at Murray and Palmer parks at reduced rates.“And I was amazed at how much fun they were having. After all, people think of them as children with problems in foster care, kids who came through the Department of Children & Families with all these issues. When you see them, they are just children who love to have a good time, who love to learn.”Who knows, the judge wonders, what seeds are planted in children with broadened positive experiences through Summer Fun for Kids?“Maybe the child who visits the Seaquarium will grow up to be a naturalist,” Judge Gerstein said. “Maybe the child who goes to camp will become a sports enthusiast.”Already, they know the impact has been positive.“What we hear, in general, is that the kids come home from camp happy and tired, which is a good thing,” said Jackie Gerstein. “They make new friends and have a lot less difficulty at home.”As Judge Gerstein said: “I know if every other person would go out of their way to do good deeds, our world would be a far better place. Each one of us can make a huge difference in a child’s life.” For more information about Summer Fun for Kids, call 305-447-2800, e-mail: sumfunforkids@aol.com, or write to P.O. Box 010563, Miami 33101. Program aims to provide foster kids with life experienceslast_img read more