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Fifth Avenue’s Childs Building sells for $45M

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first_img604 Fifth Avenue and Minamoto Kitchoan president Kemmei Okada (Photos via Google Maps, Minamoto Kitchoan)UPDATED, April 16, 2021, 2:55 p.m.: An iconic — if not well-loved — Fifth Avenue building has changed hands.The Childs Building at 604 Fifth Avenue sold to the Japanese snack chain Minamoto Kitchoan for just under $45 million, according to a deed filed with the city on Friday. The six-story building was previously home to an 18,000-square-foot TGI Fridays. Now, Minamoto Kitchoan will use the space for a new flagship.“With the retail and sales landscape evolving, I am seeing a surge in owner users stepping up to purchase real estate for their own businesses,” Compass’ Adelaide Polsinelli, who brokered the deal, said in a statement. The Riese Organization, which owns and operates restaurant chains, sold the building, with its chairman and CEO, Dennis Riese, signing the deed. A representative for Riese did not immediately respond to a request for comment.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreOne year into pandemic, Fifth Avenue blighted by empty storesNBA owes Moinian $7.5M in rent for Fifth Ave storeMAC wants to sublease 4 NYC stores Email Address* Share via Shortlink Full Name* Minamoto Kitchoan describes itself as a “fruits confectionery that emphasize[s] the appearance, shape and taste of the fruit itself.” The store has seven locations in the U.S., including an outpost on Madison Avenue that’s just a few blocks from the Childs Building. The retailer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The Fifth Avenue building has a storied past: It was created for the Childs restaurant chain in 1924 and designed by architect William Van Alen, the architect of the nearby Chrysler Building. The New York Times said that the building would be “one of the finest buildings along Fifth Avenue,” but it has been overlooked by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, which has not designated it a landmark.Fifth Avenue retail has been wounded by deflated tourist numbers. In February, a survey of the corridor by The Real Deal found that there were 32 vacant storefronts on the stretch between 42nd and 59th streets.UPDATE: This story has been updated with more details about the deal. Contact Sasha Jones Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tags Commercial Real EstateNYC RestaurantsRetail Real Estatelast_img read more

More urban areas lost population in 2020

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first_img Full Name* Email Address* Tags A lack of international migration contributed to the declines. Prior to Donald Trump’s presidency, incoming foreigners contributed substantially to urban growth, but their numbers have been dropping since 2017.The data mirror U.S. Postal Service numbers, which indicate that nearly 16 million people moved between February and July 2020, an increase of 4 percent from the previous year. The data also spiked in March and April, suggesting that the pandemic led to some decisions to move.However, other data indicates that trends may be reversing as the pandemic eases. Cellphone tracking firm Unacast found that New York City gained 1,900 people in the first two months of 2021, compared to a loss of 7,100 in 2019, Reuters reported.[NYT] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink Of the 110 metro areas with at least half a million people, 29 saw losses in 2020. (iStock)Americans made some major moves in 2020, draining the population of key cities.Urban counties saw the greatest impact of pandemic-year migration, according to an analysis of census data by the New York Times. Urban populations had also fallen in 2019 after seeing growth slow since 2012, largely from a lack of housing, but last year accelerated that trend.New York, Los Angeles and Chicago were among the 10 cities with the steepest losses.Of the 110 metro areas with at least half a million people, 29 saw losses in 2020. In 2019, that number was 26.And five lost people despite growing just a year prior: Worcester, Massachusetts; Poughkeepsie, New York; Baltimore; New Orleans; and Lansing, Michigan.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreHow many Americans actually moved during the pandemic? Flight to Florida? Data show few Manhattanites moved permanently Paradise found: Can Francis Suarez make Miami the next Big Tech mecca? Message* home salesHousing MarketResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

Characteristics of relativistic microburst intensity from SAMPEX observations

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first_imgRelativistic electron microbursts are an important electron loss process from the radiation belts into the atmosphere. These precipitation events have been shown to significantly impact the radiation belt fluxes and atmospheric chemistry. In this study we address a lack of knowledge about the relativistic microburst intensity using measurements of 21,746 microbursts from the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). We find that the relativistic microburst intensity increases as we move inward in L, with a higher proportion of low‐intensity microbursts (2,250 [MeV cm2 sr s]−1) in the 03–11 magnetic local time region increases as geomagnetic activity increases, consistent with changes in the whistler mode chorus wave activity. Comparisons between relativistic microburst properties and trapped fluxes suggest that the microburst intensities are not limited by the trapped flux present alongside the scattering processes. However, microburst activity appears to correspond to the changing trapped flux; more microbursts occur when the trapped fluxes are enhancing, suggesting that microbursts are linked to processes causing the increased trapped fluxes. Finally, modeling of the impact of a published microburst spectra on a flux tube shows that microbursts are capable of depleting <500‐keV electrons within 1 hr and depleting higher‐energy electrons in 1–23 hr.last_img read more

MILB 2020 Season Officially Canceled

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first_img Tags: MILB FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. PETERSBURG, Fla.-Per numerous sources, Tuesday, Minor League Baseball canceled its 2020 season.Their statement is as follows:pic.twitter.com/XEDFmfHTmI— Minor League Baseball (@MiLB) June 30, 2020This means the Salt Lake Bees (Triple-A) and the Ogden Raptors and Orem Owlz (Pioneer League) will not be playing this season.It is uncertain at this stage if a 2021 season will be played or not, but as the statement attests, there is hope that it can return next season. June 30, 2020 /Sports News – Local MILB 2020 Season Officially Canceled Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

Famous Irish estate agent Geralyn Byrne dies unexpectedly aged 62

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first_imgOne of Ireland’s top estate agent personalities Geralyn Byrne has died at her home unexpectedly aged just 62.For decades Byrne’s influence and sales skills dominated the often wildly competitive Dublin 6 residential property market which is the city’s equivalent to Mayfair or Kensington.After studying property, she joined Sherry Fitzgerald in 1987, a year after it was founded by Mark FitzGerald and Philip Sherry, launching her first branch in 1989 where she began cultivating her reputation as a fearless negotiator.She helped make the now 90-branch Sherry FitzGerald Ireland’s most famous estate agency, which has influence and connections far beyond the emerald isle. During the noughties it financed a management buyout of London agency Marsh & Parsons.Byrne featured regularly in Irish and international media, including one snowy day in 2018 when she famously skied to a viewing to bag an instruction.She covered many of Dublin’s most upmarket areas including Ranelagh, Dartry, Rathgar and Rathmines and sold hundreds of the multi-million euro properties to be found within them.Byrne died at her Ranelagh home on Monday night, not having reported any ill health.Mark FitzGerald (left), Sherry FitzGerald’s chairman, says: “Geralyn lived in a modern world yet possessed an old-fashioned duty of care.“Her gentle manner belied a steely resolve on behalf of her clients. Her work ethic was phenomenal and her negotiating skills legendary. We, her friends in Sherry FitzGerald, are truly devastated.”The estate agent is survived by her husband Greg Ryan, children Jack, Anna and Mike, sister Moya and brother-in-law Michael.Geralyn Byrne Marsh & Parsons Sherry Fitzgerald March 17, 2021Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Famous Irish estate agent Geralyn Byrne dies unexpectedly aged 62 previous nextAgencies & PeopleFamous Irish estate agent Geralyn Byrne dies unexpectedly aged 62Byrne helped establish and grow the country’s most famous and largest agency, Sherry Fitzgerald.Nigel Lewis17th March 202106,829 Viewslast_img read more

News story: Defence Secretary announces £80m Guardian to protect the skies

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first_img The new system provides a quantum leap in technology and information exchange for the personnel charged with the Defence of the Homeland and will ensure that future homeland operations are conducted with equipment befitting the RAF as it reaches its 100th year. The equipment will ensure that new digital technologies, along with new requirements for future capabilities, will also allow us to seamlessly exchange data and threat information across the new RAF platforms, such as the P-8 maritime patrol aircraft and F-35 Lightning II, as well as continue to integrate with our NATO colleagues to ensure the UK National mission to protect our skies and the NATO Air Policing task are met fully. Known as Project Guardian, the new Air Command and Control System will support the continued early detection and rapid response to potential hostile or suspect aircraft that pose a threat to UK sovereignty, be that terrorists or state-based actors.This project will see the current systems at RAF bases in the UK and Falkland Islands replaced with the new technology. It will allow the RAF to exercise command and control of UK and NATO fighters to intercept aggressive or suspect aircraft that are a threat. The RAF routinely intercept, identify and escort aircraft that transit international airspace within the UK’s area of interest and continue to be on call 365 days a year.Since 2013 RAF jets have launched 68 times to intercept or monitor suspect aircraft in the skies around Britain – half of these in response to Russian planes.IBM Services in the UK is leading the way to develop and install the replacement system, with work being carried out by a dedicated team of specialists at IBM locations across the country.Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Guardian will provide a new Air Command and Control system connecting the UK’s defence network of radars and radio and delivering several new capabilities to improve communication and interoperability between UK, NATO and coalition aircraft, vital to the protection of the UK’s skies. With hostile regimes such as President Putin’s Kremlin ripping up the international rulebook and terrorists still targeting our way of life, this cutting-edge technology gives our RAF the upper hand in the face of rapidly changing and intensifying global threats. This investment will play a vital role in making sure our fighter pilots are primed and ready to keep Britain safe and to counter aggression from those who seek to cause us harm.center_img The Air Command and Control System is the computer system that takes in data to generate the Recognised Air Picture – a dynamic, real time depiction of aircraft in the airspace the UK control or patrol, with each being identified as friendly or hostile. The upgrades will continue improving the rapid exchange of real time command and control information and speed and accuracy of decision making.The announcement comes as the RAF celebrates 100 years since its formation and demonstrates how the service is continuously looking at ways to design and innovate to meet the full spectrum of threats that the UK is currently facing.The contract, which IBM UK won in competition, is for approximately £60 million with costed options that the MOD can exercise which would take the total value towards £80 million. It represents a continuation of IBM UK supplying the equipment to UK armed forces and includes five years of support services following the installations.Director Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance, Dr Simon Dakin, of the MOD’s procurement organisation, Defence Equipment and Support, said: Group Captain Steven Blockley, director of the RAF’s Director, National Air Defence and Space Operations, said:last_img read more

Speech: Health and Social Care Secretary’s statement on coronavirus (COVID-19): 8 June 2020

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first_imgCoronavirus press conference 8 June 2020Good afternoon and welcome again to Downing Street for the daily coronavirus briefing. Today I want to update you on social care, something I know is of huge importance to everybody watching. I’d also like to welcome David Pearson to the press conference in his new role as Chair of our National COVID-19 Social Care Support Taskforce.Before turning to social care, I’d like to take you through latest coronavirus data.Slide 1 – testing capacity and new casesThe first slide shows number of new cases confirmed in the UK and also the level of testing. There were 138,183 tests done yesterday, bringing the total to over 5.7 million. As you can see in this chart, the number of confirmed cases was 1,205. And that is the lowest since the end of March and you can clearly see the 7-day rolling average also continuing to fall.Slide 2 – admissions and ventilatorsThe data from hospitals also shows a continued fall. The number of admissions with COVID-19 across England, Wales and Northern Ireland has fallen again to 519 – that’s down from 661 a week ago so we can see the continued downward trend in the number of new daily admissions. And the number of people on mechanical ventilators in UK as a whole is also falling and is now 516.Slide 3 – overall number of people in hospitalHere we can see the number of people in hospital with COVID on a regional basis. I know there’s been a lot of interest in the regional R figure in recent days. The estimate of SAGE, taking into account all of the evidence is that R is below 1 in all regions.In all areas the number of people in hospital with coronavirus is falling in all regions – faster in some areas than others. It is on that downward trajectory in each individual case and the total number of people in hospital is 6,403, which is down from over 7,500 this time last week.Slide 4 – mortalityThe number of deaths from coronavirus with a positive test yesterday was 55. That recorded figure is the lowest since 21 March. This data does tend to be lower at weekends so we do expect it to rise again in future, but you can see the 7-day rolling average continues to fall. That means the total number of deaths stands at 40,597.As I’ve said in the House just now, though the number is much lower than it has been, each of these deaths still represents a tragedy for a family and a community so we will continue all of our work to drive that figure down.I’m glad to report also that the number of deaths recorded in London hospitals yesterday was 0 and likewise in Scotland there were no recorded deaths – that is very good news for the capital and for Scotland.All of this data is pointing in the right direction and it shows that we are winning the battle with this disease, but they also show there’s further to go.Care homesI will now turn to care homes.The number of people dying in care homes is also falling.Figures from the CQC show there’s a 79% fall from the peak of the crisis in care homes the week ending April 24 to weekend ending 29 May, the latest when the data is available. The latest ONS data shows there were 12,739 registered deaths in care homes in the year up to 22 May and this represents 29.1% of all registered COVID deaths.From the earliest days of this crisis, we recognise that people in social care were uniquely vulnerable. Two-thirds of people in social care are over the age of 85 and the latest data from PHE show that the over 80s are 70 times more likely to die from coronavirus than the under 40s.I know personally what an anxious time it is, and it has been for anyone with a loved one in social care. Right from the start we’ve given guidance and financial support for care homes, we’ve prioritised testing, we’ve strengthened the links between the NHS and social care with a named clinical lead for every care home in England and we’ve asked councils to conduct daily reviews of the situation on the ground.And the social care COVID-19 support taskforce, which David will be chairing, will oversee delivery of the next phase of our plan for social care, ensuring care homes have the support, training, resources they need to control this virus. Crucially, this involves working with the care system to develop a plan for keeping staff and residents safe in the months after, as the lockdown measures are eased.David Pearson brings a wealth of experience in public health and in social care, so I am very glad to have him onboard and he’s perfect for the role of driving this forward over the weeks and months ahead.I also want to say a word about testing.Last month I announced that all residents and staff of elderly care homes in England would receive a test by early June regardless of whether they had symptoms or not. And I want to thank my team and those colleagues in social care who delivered that target on time on Saturday. We’ve now sent over 1 million test kits to almost 9,000 elderly care homes and the care homes themselves asked they have the flexibility to do the test when it works for them.And the good news is that the test results so far do not show a significant rise in positive cases, despite going through and testing all of the residents and staff. Throughout the crisis we’ve been rapidly testing any care home with an outbreak, or any resident or staff member with symptoms. And as we built up testing capacity, we prioritised testing of care homes for the elderly, making sure that every resident and staff member could be tested whether or not they had symptoms. And the reason we did this is because the evidence shows that age is by far the greatest risk factor.We will now make sure we do all of this in working-age care homes as well.So, I can announce that from today, all remaining adult care homes in England will be able to order the whole care homes testing service for residents and staff. This service will benefit residents and staff in over 6,000 more care homes.It’ll mean that right across adult social care, everyone will have the certainty and confidence of a high-quality coronavirus test whether symptomatic or not, certainty about whether or not they’re carrying the virus, and confidence that they’re doing the right thing both to protect themselves and others.Finally, this is carers week and I want to say a heartfelt thanks to each and every carer, whether paid or unpaid, for all the work they’re doing to support family and friends and loved ones, especially in this time of crisis. Your duty and your devotion to a job that you do with love in incredibly challenging circumstances – they’re a huge inspiration as we work through this crisis together.I understand what a worrying time it is and it’s not just because of the risk of the virus but because you haven’t been able to physically be with your loved ones.But that day when we can reunite is getting closer. The curve continues to come down, the NHS has been protected, our vaccine work is making progress, we are winning the battle against coronavirus so please stay alert, control the virus and save lives.I’m now going to ask David to set out the next steps in the social care action plan and the work to control coronavirus within social care and protect residents and staff that he’ll be leading.last_img read more

Bread dropped from sugary foods list

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first_imgAction on Sugar has removed bread from its list of unhealthy foods, following direct action from the Federation of Bakers (FoB).The FoB was concerned that by including bread in the campaign, it was misleading to consumers and that eating bread was not something to be discouraged.Last month Action on Sugar called for the introduction of a sugar tax and called on a reformulation to reduce sugar by 40% – and included bread on a list of products it claimed had too much sugar.Gordon Polson, director of FoB, told British Baker: “The industry needs to reassure the general public that bread is not high in sugar, and is a valuable part of a healthy diet. White bread typically does not have any added sugar and is usually all naturally occurring. Even if a small amount of sugar is added (for example in some wholemeal loaves), the ‘total sugars’ in bread are still below 4g per 100g, and so will be classified as ‘low sugar content’ and coded green on front-of-pack voluntary information (anything containing 5g of sugar or less).”In response to this, Action on Sugar said: “We did include bread in the list of products containing ‘large amounts of sugar’, which Action on Sugar acknowledges is not accurate, especially as much is naturally occurring.  The table on the website however, is a list of ‘Amounts of sugars per portion of some well-known food and drink products’, and is a useful guide for shoppers to be aware to check the label.”This reaction followed Action on Sugar’s seven-step plan to reduce the nation’s sugar intake to tackle obesity. Part of this plan included reducing added sugar in foods by 40% and introducing a sugar tax on foods.Sugar tax “flawed”Polson argued that the levels of sugar in bread are proportionately low, and did not need to be targeted.He said: “Linking a sugar tax to the sugar content in bread is extremely flawed. Even if a sugar tax was suggested by politicians, it would never apply to a product that is low in natural sugar, such as bread. To suggest otherwise, does not recognise the reality of such a proposal.“It’s worth noting the levels of naturally occurring sugar in common everyday, healthy foods to help put the sugar content of bread into context. For example, bananas contain 20g per 100g, apples 11g, and porridge with whole milk 4.8g.”The recent Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) report, backed by the Action on Sugar campaign, advised the government that the recommended daily sugar intake should be cut by half. This is the equivalent of 25g of sugar a day for women and 35g for men.Polson also pointed out that part of the report reiterated that carbohydrates should be 50% of dietary energy.He said: “It is therefore important that consumers continue to eat bread as part of a healthy, balanced diet.  Bread plays a vital role in UK diets providing many nutritional benefits, contributing to our carbohydrate, fibre, iron, calcium and thiamine intakes.”last_img read more

Hall & Oates, Jason Isbell, Grace Potter & More Announced For Pilgrimage Fest Lineup

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first_imgComing in hot from September 24-25 in Franklin, TN is the annual Pilgrimage Music & Culture Festival, which today has just added a number of incredible artists to their 2016 lineup. A billing that previously included Beck, Kacey Musgraves, Violent Femmes, The Arcs and more has just been supersized, including a great announcement that features some exciting talent.The new artists added include Daryl Hall & John Oates, Jason Isbell, Grace Potter, Anderson East, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Suffers, JD & The Straight Shot, Jonny P, and The Settles Connection. With these artists and so many more performing, Pilgrimage is set to be a great weekend experience of live music!Check out the new lineup announcement video below.Tickets and more information can be found here, and you can see the full lineup billing below.last_img read more

The star chemist

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first_img“If people you’re recruiting are not diverse enough then you don’t know how [a drug] is going to affect people at large,” she said. “All this leads to, of course, health disparities here in the U.S. But quite broadly, there are entire sub-continents and entire countries that you’re leaving out.”In the U.S., the COVID-19 pandemic floodlit the longstanding, systemic health inequities that put vulnerable communities at increased risk. But those disparities extend well beyond the U.S. and in different ways: When the pandemic hit, Kamariza’s tuberculosis work halted. Borders closed. Pilot projects stopped. Tuberculosis-positive patients were forced to quarantine with family, potentially spreading the disease in the name of preventing another. Efforts on diagnostics focused almost exclusively on tracking COVID-19.“A lot of people doing TB work were rewired to do COVID work,” Kamariza said. “TB patients are being left behind.” When Kamariza arrived in the U.S., settling in San Diego at age 17, science was still an alien thing. She spoke French but little English (she watched “Star Wars” and “Star Trek” to learn more); she shared a studio apartment with her two older brothers and worked part-time at Safeway while taking classes full-time at San Diego Mesa College. There, she left her love of planets behind: “How many astronauts do you know that started at a community college?” she said.By chance, she enrolled in a chemistry course with Professor Saloua Saidane, who happened to speak French. She guided Kamariza over the language barrier before pushing her to transfer to the University of California, San Diego. Kamariza needed the encouragement: Other mentors told her, bluntly, that her English and G.P.A. were too poor for her to make it to UCSD. They were wrong.Once at UCSD, Kamariza again doubted her ability to make it to graduate school. But Tracy Johnson — another chemist and the first Black woman scientist Kamariza encountered — pushed her to apply to the University of California, Berkeley. “I would never make it to UC Berkeley in a million years!” Kamariza said to Johnson. “Look at all the people who make it in. How many are African immigrants?”Kamariza often credits external interventions like miracles, luck, and mentors for her success. “For immigrants, for people who come from backgrounds that are traditionally underserved,” she said, “it’s all about opportunities and it’s about who can open the door for you.” Still, though Johnson showed her the door, Kamariza knocked. To her surprise (but not Johnson’s), she got in.At Berkeley, Kamariza joined Carolyn Bertozzi’s chemical biology lab. There, and continuing at Stanford University, she combined her knowledge of chemistry and molecular biology to eventually invent her tuberculosis diagnostic. Her test turned what used to be an 11-step process into one simple step. “Because it’s stable and because it doesn’t require a fridge to work,” Kamariza said, “you could in principle do this experiment anywhere. You could be in the tundra of Alaska or the desert of Namibia and do it.”,Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a bacteria with a cell wall thick enough to block out most drugs. Kamariza she designed a molecule that embeds into that wall and lights up — researchers only need a microscope and a reagent to see that tuberculosis is present and alive. Since her molecule ignores dead tuberculosis cells, the test can tell researchers far more about the bacteria’s reaction to certain environments and treatments. Over time, they can monitor a patient’s blood to see whether a drug kills the bacteria, and how quickly. Since results come back within a couple hours, as opposed to the month and a half that current tests require, the tool could detect and track cases and treatments far more effectively.“It was quite a day when we realized it was working,” Kamariza said. “I immediately went to the medical applications.” She was anxious to get the tool to market as quickly and safely as possible because, as she said, “I know people need it.”Bertozzi encouraged Kamariza to launch her own company. Once again, she wavered. “How many African immigrant women founders do you know in Silicon Valley in the biotech industry?” Kamariza said. “I think it’s a flat zero.”She makes at least one. In 2018, Kamariza co-founded OliLux Biosciences. The same year, Harvard offered her a position in its Society of Fellows (another offer she never thought she’d receive).“I’m the first Black woman biologist at the society,” Kamariza said. “At that point, it’s not about me anymore. It’s what I represent. It’s about people who come after me. It’s breaking a glass ceiling. It was an offer I could not refuse.”In the summer of 2019, she headed off to Cambridge and focused her efforts on diversifying the European-dominant genetic pool on which global precision medicine is based. “For immigrants, for people who come from backgrounds that are traditionally underserved, it’s all about opportunities …” — Mireille Kamariza Growing up in Bujumbura, Burundi, Mireille Kamariza didn’t know any astronomers, or any scientists at all for that matter. But she adored planets anyway. At the start of every school year, she and her fellow students would wrap up their notebooks to protect them from wear. And every year, Kamariza hunted her town for magazines with glossy pictures of planets, astronauts, and “any news about astronomy.” Between classes, she stared at those astronomical covers like they were portals to a fantastical world.The Junior Fellow never ended up floating among the stars, at least not in a literal sense. This August, Chemical & Engineering News named her one of its Talented 12 for her invention of a quick, low-cost test to detect tuberculosis. In 2017, Fortune magazine named her one of the World’s Most Powerful Women while she was still a graduate student. In 2018, she earned an even rarer title: co-founder of a company in the male-dominated biotech industry. In a way, the world she now inhabits — that of an award-winning scientist, Silicon Valley biotech entrepreneur, degree recipient from the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University — was a fantastical world, at least to that young girl in Burundi who got lost in pictures of Mars and Venus.“It feels like a different life,” Kamariza said, “It’s nothing short of a miracle that I’m one of the few that was able to make that jump.”After achieving the fantastical, Kamariza is tackling a very real problem: Throughout the developing world, including Burundi, tuberculosis is one of the top causes of death. In 2018, the disease killed 1.5 million worldwide, far more than even AIDS. Though testing and treatment are on the rise, low-income, rural populations still struggle to detect and contain the disease (especially now that COVID-19 diagnostics are prioritized over every other infectious disease). Each year, about 10 million people develop tuberculosis and about 3 million go undetected, Kamariza said. Her invention — a portable diagnostic tool — could help identify more cases faster, anywhere in the world, to prevent further spread, get treatment to those in need, and even monitor the effectiveness of that treatment. “A lot of people doing TB work were rewired to do COVID work. TB patients are being left behind.” — Mireille Kamariza, Junior Fellow New blood monitoring could be used to help people infected with tuberculosis Promising progress on TB New generation of drugs show early efficacy against drug-resistant type A timely triage test for TB Related In the U.S., most people don’t see tuberculosis as a threat, especially now. “People talk about diabetes and all these other complex, metabolic diseases. Rarely do people talk about infectious diseases,” Kamariza said. “Whereas, the places that I have my eye on, this is the reality every day.” Even during the pandemic, OliLux continues to focus on tuberculosis, hoping to get tests out to places like Indonesia, Singapore, and South Africa.On top of everything else, Kamariza tries to keep up with social media, to be “visible,” she said, and make sure young scientists, who pore over pictures of planets or whatever else captures their imagination, see that she achieved the fantastical, and they can, too. “It stops being about me,” she said. “It really does become about the history and the legacy of what we as human beings are doing.”last_img read more