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Hall & Oates, Jason Isbell, Grace Potter & More Announced For Pilgrimage Fest Lineup

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first_imgComing in hot from September 24-25 in Franklin, TN is the annual Pilgrimage Music & Culture Festival, which today has just added a number of incredible artists to their 2016 lineup. A billing that previously included Beck, Kacey Musgraves, Violent Femmes, The Arcs and more has just been supersized, including a great announcement that features some exciting talent.The new artists added include Daryl Hall & John Oates, Jason Isbell, Grace Potter, Anderson East, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Suffers, JD & The Straight Shot, Jonny P, and The Settles Connection. With these artists and so many more performing, Pilgrimage is set to be a great weekend experience of live music!Check out the new lineup announcement video below.Tickets and more information can be found here, and you can see the full lineup billing below.last_img read more

The star chemist

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first_img“If people you’re recruiting are not diverse enough then you don’t know how [a drug] is going to affect people at large,” she said. “All this leads to, of course, health disparities here in the U.S. But quite broadly, there are entire sub-continents and entire countries that you’re leaving out.”In the U.S., the COVID-19 pandemic floodlit the longstanding, systemic health inequities that put vulnerable communities at increased risk. But those disparities extend well beyond the U.S. and in different ways: When the pandemic hit, Kamariza’s tuberculosis work halted. Borders closed. Pilot projects stopped. Tuberculosis-positive patients were forced to quarantine with family, potentially spreading the disease in the name of preventing another. Efforts on diagnostics focused almost exclusively on tracking COVID-19.“A lot of people doing TB work were rewired to do COVID work,” Kamariza said. “TB patients are being left behind.” When Kamariza arrived in the U.S., settling in San Diego at age 17, science was still an alien thing. She spoke French but little English (she watched “Star Wars” and “Star Trek” to learn more); she shared a studio apartment with her two older brothers and worked part-time at Safeway while taking classes full-time at San Diego Mesa College. There, she left her love of planets behind: “How many astronauts do you know that started at a community college?” she said.By chance, she enrolled in a chemistry course with Professor Saloua Saidane, who happened to speak French. She guided Kamariza over the language barrier before pushing her to transfer to the University of California, San Diego. Kamariza needed the encouragement: Other mentors told her, bluntly, that her English and G.P.A. were too poor for her to make it to UCSD. They were wrong.Once at UCSD, Kamariza again doubted her ability to make it to graduate school. But Tracy Johnson — another chemist and the first Black woman scientist Kamariza encountered — pushed her to apply to the University of California, Berkeley. “I would never make it to UC Berkeley in a million years!” Kamariza said to Johnson. “Look at all the people who make it in. How many are African immigrants?”Kamariza often credits external interventions like miracles, luck, and mentors for her success. “For immigrants, for people who come from backgrounds that are traditionally underserved,” she said, “it’s all about opportunities and it’s about who can open the door for you.” Still, though Johnson showed her the door, Kamariza knocked. To her surprise (but not Johnson’s), she got in.At Berkeley, Kamariza joined Carolyn Bertozzi’s chemical biology lab. There, and continuing at Stanford University, she combined her knowledge of chemistry and molecular biology to eventually invent her tuberculosis diagnostic. Her test turned what used to be an 11-step process into one simple step. “Because it’s stable and because it doesn’t require a fridge to work,” Kamariza said, “you could in principle do this experiment anywhere. You could be in the tundra of Alaska or the desert of Namibia and do it.”,Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a bacteria with a cell wall thick enough to block out most drugs. Kamariza she designed a molecule that embeds into that wall and lights up — researchers only need a microscope and a reagent to see that tuberculosis is present and alive. Since her molecule ignores dead tuberculosis cells, the test can tell researchers far more about the bacteria’s reaction to certain environments and treatments. Over time, they can monitor a patient’s blood to see whether a drug kills the bacteria, and how quickly. Since results come back within a couple hours, as opposed to the month and a half that current tests require, the tool could detect and track cases and treatments far more effectively.“It was quite a day when we realized it was working,” Kamariza said. “I immediately went to the medical applications.” She was anxious to get the tool to market as quickly and safely as possible because, as she said, “I know people need it.”Bertozzi encouraged Kamariza to launch her own company. Once again, she wavered. “How many African immigrant women founders do you know in Silicon Valley in the biotech industry?” Kamariza said. “I think it’s a flat zero.”She makes at least one. In 2018, Kamariza co-founded OliLux Biosciences. The same year, Harvard offered her a position in its Society of Fellows (another offer she never thought she’d receive).“I’m the first Black woman biologist at the society,” Kamariza said. “At that point, it’s not about me anymore. It’s what I represent. It’s about people who come after me. It’s breaking a glass ceiling. It was an offer I could not refuse.”In the summer of 2019, she headed off to Cambridge and focused her efforts on diversifying the European-dominant genetic pool on which global precision medicine is based. “For immigrants, for people who come from backgrounds that are traditionally underserved, it’s all about opportunities …” — Mireille Kamariza Growing up in Bujumbura, Burundi, Mireille Kamariza didn’t know any astronomers, or any scientists at all for that matter. But she adored planets anyway. At the start of every school year, she and her fellow students would wrap up their notebooks to protect them from wear. And every year, Kamariza hunted her town for magazines with glossy pictures of planets, astronauts, and “any news about astronomy.” Between classes, she stared at those astronomical covers like they were portals to a fantastical world.The Junior Fellow never ended up floating among the stars, at least not in a literal sense. This August, Chemical & Engineering News named her one of its Talented 12 for her invention of a quick, low-cost test to detect tuberculosis. In 2017, Fortune magazine named her one of the World’s Most Powerful Women while she was still a graduate student. In 2018, she earned an even rarer title: co-founder of a company in the male-dominated biotech industry. In a way, the world she now inhabits — that of an award-winning scientist, Silicon Valley biotech entrepreneur, degree recipient from the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University — was a fantastical world, at least to that young girl in Burundi who got lost in pictures of Mars and Venus.“It feels like a different life,” Kamariza said, “It’s nothing short of a miracle that I’m one of the few that was able to make that jump.”After achieving the fantastical, Kamariza is tackling a very real problem: Throughout the developing world, including Burundi, tuberculosis is one of the top causes of death. In 2018, the disease killed 1.5 million worldwide, far more than even AIDS. Though testing and treatment are on the rise, low-income, rural populations still struggle to detect and contain the disease (especially now that COVID-19 diagnostics are prioritized over every other infectious disease). Each year, about 10 million people develop tuberculosis and about 3 million go undetected, Kamariza said. Her invention — a portable diagnostic tool — could help identify more cases faster, anywhere in the world, to prevent further spread, get treatment to those in need, and even monitor the effectiveness of that treatment. “A lot of people doing TB work were rewired to do COVID work. TB patients are being left behind.” — Mireille Kamariza, Junior Fellow New blood monitoring could be used to help people infected with tuberculosis Promising progress on TB New generation of drugs show early efficacy against drug-resistant type A timely triage test for TB Related In the U.S., most people don’t see tuberculosis as a threat, especially now. “People talk about diabetes and all these other complex, metabolic diseases. Rarely do people talk about infectious diseases,” Kamariza said. “Whereas, the places that I have my eye on, this is the reality every day.” Even during the pandemic, OliLux continues to focus on tuberculosis, hoping to get tests out to places like Indonesia, Singapore, and South Africa.On top of everything else, Kamariza tries to keep up with social media, to be “visible,” she said, and make sure young scientists, who pore over pictures of planets or whatever else captures their imagination, see that she achieved the fantastical, and they can, too. “It stops being about me,” she said. “It really does become about the history and the legacy of what we as human beings are doing.”last_img read more

Tony Shalhoub Discusses Next Stage Role: Happy Days with Wife Brooke Adams

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first_img View Comments Tony Shalhoub is going from multiple costume (and character) changes and climbing up and down a revolving staircase in Act One to a far less physically demanding role. The Tony nominee stopped by Late Night on June 12 to share with Seth Meyers his upcoming stage venture: Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days opposite his wife, Brooke Adams. Shalhoub explained that in the play, “She’s buried in a mound up to her waist in the first act and up to her neck in the second act. I’m her husband and I’m just basically behind the mound lying down. Every once in a while I pop my head up and say a couple of words.” Beckett’s not exactly light material, but at least it’ll be easier on your legs, Mr. Shalhoub! What other projects does the actor have in the works? The voice of the rat Splinter in the upcoming Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film…Check out clips from the interview below! Star Files Act One Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2014 Related Shows Tony Shalhoublast_img read more

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont’s Ingrid Temer promoted to Senior Account Manager

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first_imgBerlin, VT : Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) announced recently that Ingrid Temer has been promoted to Senior Account Manager in the Sales and Service Department.Temer will assume additional responsibilities for advancing client-centric projects and initiatives that increase employer satisfaction with the health plan’s products and services. As the department’s Senior Account Manager, Temer will also serve a pivotal role as a resource for other account managers and sales and service representatives.Temer continues to fulfill her account management duties with key accounts such as University of Vermont, City of Burlington, Norwich University and Rock of Ages Corp. Temer joined Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont in 2004, bringing account management experience to BCBSVT from national health insurance carriers. Temer has earned the respect and admiration of co-workers, clients and consultants with her professional attitude and demonstrated commitment to advancing positive change.Temer is participating in the 2007 Leadership Champlain program, a community-service initiative which attracts civic and business leaders in Chittenden County. Temer is the first Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont employee to be nominated to this highly regarded program. Temer also serves on the Diversity Committee at BCBSVT and the Community and Outreach Committee of the Community Health Center of Burlington.Temer, her husband and two children reside in Burlington, Vermont.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and has offered group and individual health plans to Vermonters for more than 60 years. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external) Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.last_img read more

Demystifying machine learning

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first_img 42SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In 1959, Arthur Samuel defined machine learning as a “field of study that gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed.” No, wait – Did I just type “1959?”  Yes, true!Machine learning, which is a branch of artificial intelligence (AI), has been around a while, but the technology has made enormous strides since 1959.  The ability to learn without explicitly being programmed sounds like a mantra taken from a child-rearing manual from the 1950s. However, this concept has even greater potential today when we apply the technology to fraud prevention.Machine learning will still require the presence of humans to calibrate and confirm fraud, and to assist the model in learning from historical data.  But the promise of a faster and more accurate solution for fraud prevention has CO-OP very excited about the possibilities – which is why our company is becoming an early adopter of this technology. continue reading »last_img read more

CUNA backs proposed delay of payday rule, calls for changes

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first_imgCUNA supports supposed the proposed delay of the compliance date for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) payday lending rule, but also supports a delay of the entire rule, it wrote to the CFPB Monday. CUNA sent it letter in response to a proposed delay of the mandatory underwriting provisions to the rule to Nov. 19, 2020 (originally set for Aug. 19, 2019.).CUNA believes the proposed delay would provide credit unions an opportunity to adequately prepare for implementation.“Given the Payday Rule’s broad scope and the pending challenge to the rule’s legality in federal court, the Bureau should delay the rule in its entirety rather than merely delaying the ability-to-repay (ATR) provisions that are the subject of the rescission proposal,” the letter reads. “A delay of the entire rule is especially warranted if the CFPB intends to amend other aspects of the rule, such as the payments provisions, in the near term.”CUNA believes the CFPB’s approach to regulating payday lending should be consistent with several broad objectives: continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Norwegian government rules out real assets for domestic sovereign fund

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first_imgThe Norwegian government has ruled out allowing either of its sovereign funds to invest in unlisted infrastructure and ignored calls from the Government Pension Fund Norway (GPFN) to broaden its mandate to include real estate.Folketrygdfondet, which manages the NOK198bn (€21.4bn) Government Pension Fund Norway (GPFN), saw its calls to diversify the fund’s portfolio ignored by the Norwegian Ministry of Finance, which said any diversification benefits stemming from a move into real assets could be achieved “by other, simpler means”.However, the government gave the larger Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG) permission to expand its unlisted real estate allocation to 7% of assets, up from 5%.In its annual report to Parliament on the management of both sovereign funds – the GPFN and the substantially larger globally focused counterpart – the Ministry said the domestic infrastructure market was “small and underdeveloped”. “Any investments in infrastructure by the GPFN will most likely result from the sale of such assets by the central or local government,” the report said.“Such a change of ownership will leave the state’s overall risk level unchanged, and usually generate significant transaction costs.”The fund, which returned 7% last year, is currently limited to investing in equity and fixed income. Of its total portfolio, 85% must be invested in Norway, with the remainder able to be invested in neighbouring Scandinavian countries. With respect to the NOK 7.5trn GPFG, the Ministry said it was “uncertain whether unlisted infrastructure improved risk diversification or raised expected returns”, arguing that only 0.5% of the global investable market was currently unlisted infrastructure.Finance minister Siv Jensen said: “A number of important factors indicate that investments in unlisted infrastructure should not be permitted.“Such investments are exposed to high regulatory or political risk. Conflicts with the authorities of other countries regarding the regulation of transport, energy supply and other important public goods will generally be difficult to handle and entail reputational risk for the fund.”She added: “The government considers that a transparent, politically endorsed state fund like the GPFG is less suited to bear this type of risk than other investors. Following an overall assessment, the Ministry is not prepared to permit the GPFG to invest in unlisted infrastructure at this stage.Jensen said it would be useful to gain greater experience with unlisted real estate before considering other unlisted asset classes – likely a reference to the now-rejected infrastructure allocation, or the exposure to private equity long desired by Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM).The Ministry’s decision to grow the unlisted real estate allocation comes more than a year after the government commissioned a review, led by London Business School’s Elroy Dimson, on the current 5% cap on real estate.Real estate performance will also be benchmarked against a reference portfolio of equities and bonds.This would move the GPFG in line with some other large institutional investors that use a similar ‘opportunity cost model’, including the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.“The investments will be evaluated against a broadly composed index that can, in principle, be followed closely at low cost,” the Ministry said in a statement.The new approach should give NBIM more flexibility when it comes to deciding on new real estate investments.But the organisation will need to ensure real estate investments stay below the 7% limit to avoid any forced selling should the GPFG’s listed investments suffer significant falls in their value.The decision to increase the real estate exposure comes at a time when the government awaits a review of the GPFG’s equity allocation, due in October, which could also see an increase in the equity allocation beyond its current 60%.last_img read more

Terror drill at Kenya’s Strathmore University leaves worker dead, 20 students…

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first_imgA Strathmore University, Nairobi, staff member died and at least 20 students were injured Monday following a security drill that was conducted to gauge the institution’s level of preparedness in responding to a terror attack.The employee died in hospital where she and others who were injured in the drill were taken.“We confirm that we have one fatality, this evening.  One staff member by name Esther Kidemba, 33, has died from severe head injuries. Efforts to resuscitate her failed and she succumbed to the injuries.The family has been informed of this,” the university’s Director of Communication Betty Ngala said in a statement sent to newsrooms.Most of the injured were rushed to Nairobi West Hospital and some to Nairobi Hospital. Two of them were placed in the Intensive Care Unit at Nairobi West Hospital.“Most of those we received had fractures while some sustained head and chest injuries,” said Dr Evans Mwenda of Nairobi West Hospital.Some of the students jumped from upper floors of some of the university’s tall buildings, leading to the limb injuries.Shocked students narrated how the mock attack happened, their escape from class and nearby hostels and the frightening sight of the “attackers”.The drill was conducted near the Student Centre where most students gather before and after classes.Students said those involved in the exercise ‘‘carried real guns’’ and wore attire similar to those used by Al-Shabaab attackers.“I saw someone coming up the stairs with a gun and wearing Al-Shabaab outfit. I ran and hid under a table before getting out through a window. People were screaming all over. I am really scared,” said Martin Chege, a student who was at the Student Centre.The learners faulted the University for failing to inform them prior to the drill, saying they would have been better prepared and injuries would have been avoided.Parents of the injured students also said it was wrong for the university to conduct the drill without proper preparations.last_img read more

Man arrested for ‘illegal’ cock derby

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first_imgJoem Polmo, a resident of the village,was caught around at 1:20 p.m. on March 29, a police report showed. Polmo was taken to Police Station 1. Hefaces charges for violation of PresidentialDecree 1602, or the anti-illegalgambling law./PN At least nine persons inside the cockpithowever managed to evade police capture, leaving Polmo who resisted arrest but waslater subdued. ILOILO City- Police arrested a suspectedillegal cockpit maintainer in Barangay Rizal Pala-Pala, City Proper.center_img Recovered from the suspect were nine gamefowls. Polmo’s apprehension came after policeconducted an operation in the said village. last_img read more

College professor charged, weapons seized under ‘Red Flag Law’

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first_imgHanover, In. — A Hanover College professor has been charged with intimidation and his weapons have been confiscated by the court.Reports indicate James Stark has a history of making threats to coworkers and community members. On March 1, Stark made a comment about taking hand grenades into the emergency room at King’s Daughters Hospital. Nurses told investigators he called them “vampires” and threw his paperwork at them.After family members called police action was taken. Police filed intimidation charges and seized his weapons under the Indiana “Red Flag Law.” Mr. Stark is currently out on bail.last_img read more